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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sludge from Septic Tank

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  • Pat D
    cardboard has glue in it, which i think is high in lead, which could possibly get into the fruit and that wouldn t be good.  have you tried fukuoka s idea of
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 4, 2009
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      cardboard has glue in it, which i think is high in lead, which could possibly get into the fruit and that wouldn't be good.  have you tried fukuoka's idea of using a green mulch of White Clover?

      --- On Sun, 1/4/09, edward barton <siliconvalley47@...> wrote:
      From: edward barton <siliconvalley47@...>
      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Sludge from Septic Tank
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, January 4, 2009, 9:29 AM











      Hi All,

      I have a mango and coconut orchard near Mumbai India.

      I have been following Natural farming practices since inception about 10 yrs ago.

      There is a hotel near my farm and they are offering sludge ( the dried solids) from the septic tank for my use.

      I am not sure if such dried solids can be used in a orchard where fruits aee meant for human consumption. Can anyone guide me on this?Is there a chance of dangerous pathogens entering the food chain.?

      Can such solids be used for ornamental plants?



      I have been reading about using cardboard for making compost.My questions is whether the rotting cardboard under soil would also attract termites? and is there a chance that these termites then would attack the nearby trees?

      Thanks in advance

      regards

      ef































      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • George.com
      Pat I d be surprised if glue contained lead any more. Environmental concerns would have phased it out no? rob ... From: Pat D To:
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 4, 2009
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        Pat

        I'd be surprised if glue contained lead any more. Environmental concerns would have phased it out no?

        rob

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Pat D
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, January 05, 2009 3:33 PM
        Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sludge from Septic Tank


        cardboard has glue in it, which i think is high in lead, which could possibly get into the fruit and that wouldn't be good. have you tried fukuoka's idea of using a green mulch of White Clover?

        --- On Sun, 1/4/09, edward barton <siliconvalley47@...> wrote:
        From: edward barton <siliconvalley47@...>
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Sludge from Septic Tank
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, January 4, 2009, 9:29 AM

        Hi All,

        I have a mango and coconut orchard near Mumbai India.

        I have been following Natural farming practices since inception about 10 yrs ago.

        There is a hotel near my farm and they are offering sludge ( the dried solids) from the septic tank for my use.

        I am not sure if such dried solids can be used in a orchard where fruits aee meant for human consumption. Can anyone guide me on this?Is there a chance of dangerous pathogens entering the food chain.?

        Can such solids be used for ornamental plants?

        I have been reading about using cardboard for making compost.My questions is whether the rotting cardboard under soil would also attract termites? and is there a chance that these termites then would attack the nearby trees?

        Thanks in advance

        regards

        ef











        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



        No virus found in this incoming message.
        Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
        Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.10.2/1871 - Release Date: 1/01/2009 5:01 p.m.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dieter Brand
        Edward, There are many different views of what Natural Farming actually is. In my view (and I agree with Raju in this respect), Natural Farming attempts to
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 5, 2009
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          Edward,

          There are many different views of what Natural Farming actually is.
          In my view (and I agree with Raju in this respect), Natural Farming
          attempts to grow food crops without fertilizers or other external
          inputs; this includes organic fertilizers or even compost bought from
          an outside source.

          Obviously, in cases in which organic matter, manure or even sludge
          that would otherwise go to a landfill is freely available, there may
          be a case for using it on our land. However, when doing so, there is
          the issue of contamination we have to address. I think the problem of
          pathogens is wildly exaggerated. There will always be microorganisms
          we consider as pathogens, but in any healthy soil environment these
          so-called pathogens will be dealt with by the overwhelming number of
          beneficial microorganisms.

          Contamination from chemical and pharmaceutical substances, on the
          other hand, is a problem of such magnitude that I don't know if there
          will ever by sufficient technical means for treating sludge so as to
          make quite sure that no contaminations remain. Even routine chemical
          analysis for a wide range of substances is likely to be so expensive
          as to price the product far beyond any reasonable level. 50 years
          ago, it would have been no problem to use sludge; however, in the last
          few decades humans have released well over 100,000 new chemical
          compounds into the environment. Most people pour considerable amounts
          of chemicals down their drain, which will get with the grey water into
          the septic tank. I have spent many years of my life in the Far East
          and know that in most countries there medical doctors are very
          generous about describing antibiotics and other very aggressive drugs.
          All of this goes into the sludge.

          Recent news reports about contaminated hay, manure and even compost
          have shown that many chemical compounds go through several stages of
          the food chain without being broken down or without loosing their
          harmful effect. A chemical applied to a field will be transmitted to
          the grass growing on this field, to the cow eating the grass, to the
          manure from that cow, to the compost made from that manure, to the
          soil that compost was applied to and to the vegetables grown on that
          soil.

          In orchards the issue of fertility can be easily address by growing
          plants underneath the trees. If you are not happy with the native
          weeds and grasses that grow there naturally, you could try one or more
          of a large range of cover crops. In a hot climate, festuca which is
          heat-killed may be a good option. For example look at the way
          Japanese farmers make use of festuca at:

          http://www.sudatikaen.com/kazyuen-4.htm

          The gradual soil improvement through the root action and the decaying
          organic matter of the plants growing on your soil will create a
          balance that can only be disturbed by any addition of fertilizers
          brought in from somewhere else.

          Dieter Brand
          Portugal


          On 1/5/09, George.com <roblyn@...> wrote:
          > Pat
          >
          > I'd be surprised if glue contained lead any more. Environmental concerns
          > would have phased it out no?
          >
          > rob
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Pat D
          > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Monday, January 05, 2009 3:33 PM
          > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sludge from Septic Tank
          >
          >
          > cardboard has glue in it, which i think is high in lead, which could
          > possibly get into the fruit and that wouldn't be good. have you tried
          > fukuoka's idea of using a green mulch of White Clover?
          >
          > --- On Sun, 1/4/09, edward barton <siliconvalley47@...> wrote:
          > From: edward barton <siliconvalley47@...>
          > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Sludge from Septic Tank
          > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Sunday, January 4, 2009, 9:29 AM
          >
          > Hi All,
          >
          > I have a mango and coconut orchard near Mumbai India.
          >
          > I have been following Natural farming practices since inception about 10
          > yrs ago.
          >
          > There is a hotel near my farm and they are offering sludge ( the dried
          > solids) from the septic tank for my use.
          >
          > I am not sure if such dried solids can be used in a orchard where fruits
          > aee meant for human consumption. Can anyone guide me on this?Is there a
          > chance of dangerous pathogens entering the food chain.?
          >
          > Can such solids be used for ornamental plants?
          >
          > I have been reading about using cardboard for making compost.My questions
          > is whether the rotting cardboard under soil would also attract termites? and
          > is there a chance that these termites then would attack the nearby trees?
          >
          > Thanks in advance
          >
          > regards
          >
          > ef
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >
          >
          >
          > No virus found in this incoming message.
          > Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
          > Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.10.2/1871 - Release Date: 1/01/2009
          > 5:01 p.m.
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
        • Michael Meredith
          Amen , brother. Michael ________________________________ From: Dieter Brand To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, January
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 5, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Amen , brother.
            Michael




            ________________________________
            From: Dieter Brand <brand.dieter@...>
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, January 5, 2009 5:56:09 AM
            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sludge from Septic Tank


            Edward,

            There are many different views of what Natural Farming actually is.
            In my view (and I agree with Raju in this respect), Natural Farming
            attempts to grow food crops without fertilizers or other external
            inputs; this includes organic fertilizers or even compost bought from
            an outside source.

            Obviously, in cases in which organic matter, manure or even sludge
            that would otherwise go to a landfill is freely available, there may
            be a case for using it on our land. However, when doing so, there is
            the issue of contamination we have to address. I think the problem of
            pathogens is wildly exaggerated. There will always be microorganisms
            we consider as pathogens, but in any healthy soil environment these
            so-called pathogens will be dealt with by the overwhelming number of
            beneficial microorganisms.

            Contamination from chemical and pharmaceutical substances, on the
            other hand, is a problem of such magnitude that I don't know if there
            will ever by sufficient technical means for treating sludge so as to
            make quite sure that no contaminations remain. Even routine chemical
            analysis for a wide range of substances is likely to be so expensive
            as to price the product far beyond any reasonable level. 50 years
            ago, it would have been no problem to use sludge; however, in the last
            few decades humans have released well over 100,000 new chemical
            compounds into the environment. Most people pour considerable amounts
            of chemicals down their drain, which will get with the grey water into
            the septic tank. I have spent many years of my life in the Far East
            and know that in most countries there medical doctors are very
            generous about describing antibiotics and other very aggressive drugs.
            All of this goes into the sludge.

            Recent news reports about contaminated hay, manure and even compost
            have shown that many chemical compounds go through several stages of
            the food chain without being broken down or without loosing their
            harmful effect. A chemical applied to a field will be transmitted to
            the grass growing on this field, to the cow eating the grass, to the
            manure from that cow, to the compost made from that manure, to the
            soil that compost was applied to and to the vegetables grown on that
            soil.

            In orchards the issue of fertility can be easily address by growing
            plants underneath the trees. If you are not happy with the native
            weeds and grasses that grow there naturally, you could try one or more
            of a large range of cover crops. In a hot climate, festuca which is
            heat-killed may be a good option. For example look at the way
            Japanese farmers make use of festuca at:

            http://www.sudatika en.com/kazyuen- 4.htm

            The gradual soil improvement through the root action and the decaying
            organic matter of the plants growing on your soil will create a
            balance that can only be disturbed by any addition of fertilizers
            brought in from somewhere else.

            Dieter Brand
            Portugal

            On 1/5/09, George.com <roblyn@ihug. co.nz> wrote:
            > Pat
            >
            > I'd be surprised if glue contained lead any more. Environmental concerns
            > would have phased it out no?
            >
            > rob
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Pat D
            > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
            > Sent: Monday, January 05, 2009 3:33 PM
            > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sludge from Septic Tank
            >
            >
            > cardboard has glue in it, which i think is high in lead, which could
            > possibly get into the fruit and that wouldn't be good. have you tried
            > fukuoka's idea of using a green mulch of White Clover?
            >
            > --- On Sun, 1/4/09, edward barton <siliconvalley47@ yahoo.com> wrote:
            > From: edward barton <siliconvalley47@ yahoo.com>
            > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Sludge from Septic Tank
            > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
            > Date: Sunday, January 4, 2009, 9:29 AM
            >
            > Hi All,
            >
            > I have a mango and coconut orchard near Mumbai India.
            >
            > I have been following Natural farming practices since inception about 10
            > yrs ago.
            >
            > There is a hotel near my farm and they are offering sludge ( the dried
            > solids) from the septic tank for my use.
            >
            > I am not sure if such dried solids can be used in a orchard where fruits
            > aee meant for human consumption. Can anyone guide me on this?Is there a
            > chance of dangerous pathogens entering the food chain.?
            >
            > Can such solids be used for ornamental plants?
            >
            > I have been reading about using cardboard for making compost.My questions
            > is whether the rotting cardboard under soil would also attract termites? and
            > is there a chance that these termites then would attack the nearby trees?
            >
            > Thanks in advance
            >
            > regards
            >
            > ef
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
            >
            >
            >
            > No virus found in this incoming message.
            > Checked by AVG - http://www.avg com
            > Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.10.2/1871 - Release Date: 1/01/2009
            > 5:01 p.m.
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • edward barton
            Dear Friends, Thanks to all friends who responded to my querry.It has helped me clarify lot of questions. Raju, my farm may not be a fukuoka farmig compliant
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 6, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Dear Friends,
              Thanks to all friends who responded to my querry.It has helped me clarify lot of questions.
              Raju, my farm may not be a fukuoka farmig compliant but when i said i am using Natural farming practices i meant i dont use any chemical pesticides or chemical fertilisers for use in my orchard.
              I have now realised that Fukuoka suggested parctices include no tilling, no weeding ,no composting, no bringing in external sources of fertilisers etc.
              I would term my farm as chemical free farm.Now in my view a chemical free farm is natural farm or not is difficult for me to say..
              I only know that in Nature there is no chemical production but only natural organic matters reacating with each other in a very complex play.
              I have 5- 6 cows on the orchard and i use the cow manure in the compost heap.I do cut the tall grasses and weeds growing around the mango trees and place it in the compost pile.I have been told that if the grasses are not removed around the mango trees then pests including termites would attack the trees.
              I dont know how far this is true as i am a hobbyist orchard owner.

              My orchard has grown out of my love for Nature and it is not a commercial establishment.The mangoes grown on my orchard are the sweetest mangoes and 1000 times sweeter than what is available in the markets around here.
              thanks once again to all friends
              regards to all
              edward.


              __________________________________________________
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            • Raju Titus
              Dear Edward, There is lot of confusion in Natural and Organic way of farmings. People think that using organic fertilizers,insecticides,weed killers are
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 7, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Dear Edward,
                There is lot of confusion in Natural and Organic way of farmings. People
                think that using organic fertilizers,insecticides,weed killers are natural.
                But these are all unnatural practises.Keeping Cows more easy with zero
                tillage.There is no need of making compost of Cow dung. It will be useful as
                early as returned to soil. In Mango orchard there is no need of weeding .
                Green cover of land in the shade area of trees helps in so many ways. It
                protects trees from insects and diseases,conserve moisture,supply organic
                fertilizer. The taste,flavour,and yield improves every season due to this
                cover. Killing of weeds and insects by Malathion or by Neem are same.
                Fukuoka Farming based of no killing (nonviolence). Tilling of land is most
                harmful unnatural practise.It creates demand of fertilizer and water
                and improves weeds and insects problem.
                Thanks
                Raju



                On 1/6/09, edward barton <siliconvalley47@...> wrote:
                >
                > Dear Friends,
                > Thanks to all friends who responded to my querry.It has helped me clarify
                > lot of questions.
                > Raju, my farm may not be a fukuoka farmig compliant but when i said i am
                > using Natural farming practices i meant i dont use any chemical pesticides
                > or chemical fertilisers for use in my orchard.
                > I have now realised that Fukuoka suggested parctices include no tilling, no
                > weeding ,no composting, no bringing in external sources of fertilisers etc.
                > I would term my farm as chemical free farm.Now in my view a chemical free
                > farm is natural farm or not is difficult for me to say..
                > I only know that in Nature there is no chemical production but only natural
                > organic matters reacating with each other in a very complex play.
                > I have 5- 6 cows on the orchard and i use the cow manure in the compost
                > heap.I do cut the tall grasses and weeds growing around the mango trees and
                > place it in the compost pile.I have been told that if the grasses are not
                > removed around the mango trees then pests including termites would attack
                > the trees.
                > I dont know how far this is true as i am a hobbyist orchard owner.
                >
                > My orchard has grown out of my love for Nature and it is not a commercial
                > establishment.The mangoes grown on my orchard are the sweetest mangoes and
                > 1000 times sweeter than what is available in the markets around here.
                > thanks once again to all friends
                > regards to all
                > edward.
                >
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do You Yahoo!?
                > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                > http://mail.yahoo.com
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • garden03048
                My orchard has grown out of my love for Nature and it is not a commercial establishment.The mangoes grown on my orchard are the sweetest mangoes and 1000 times
                Message 7 of 11 , Jan 7, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  My orchard has grown out of my love for
                  Nature and it is not a commercial establishment.The mangoes grown on my
                  orchard are the sweetest mangoes and 1000 times sweeter than what is
                  available in the markets around here.
                  > thanks once again to all friends
                  > regards to all
                  > edward.
                  >
                  >
                  >You make me jealous. I love mangoes but they are not about to grow
                  in Massachusetts.

                  anthony
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