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Sanigouti I turn graph

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  • Dieter Brand
    In Tokujima prefecture, Japan, a young couple returned to live in the country to practice Natural Farming without ploughing as the first household in their
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 18, 2008
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      In Tokujima prefecture, Japan, a young couple returned to live in the
      country to practice Natural Farming without ploughing as the first
      household in their village. They have documented their adventures in
      pictures since 2000 in these pages:

      http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~amal/text/i12.html
      http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~amal/text/i3oct.html
      http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~amal/text/i4is.html
      http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~amal/text/i5tama.html

      As can be seen from several pictures, some vegetables, like cabbages
      and broccoli, didn't grow very well naturally without fertilizers
      because the soil was still too poor in the beginning. That is
      certainly an experience I have made too.

      They built themselves a shed for making bamboo charcoal. Apparently,
      charcoal made from bamboo gives food a special flavour. It is also
      used against electromagnetic waves, to purify water and air and
      against tooth aches.

      The device is also useful for backing sweet potatoes, yakiimo, which
      are a fixed part of traditional life in Japan. The shouts of the
      yakiimo street vendors bring back sweet memories to anyone who ever
      lived in Japan.

      The two with their dog look like they enjoy what they are doing.

      Dieter Brand
      Portugal
    • Robert Monie
      Dieter,   Thanks for reporting these real-life natural farmers from Japan.  The expression on their faces tells all.  Natural farming is not nirvanah, but
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 19, 2008
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        Dieter,
         
        Thanks for reporting these real-life natural farmers from Japan.  The expression on their faces tells all.  Natural farming is not nirvanah, but it can bring happiness. Roots in the ground (rather than in the compost heap) are naturally fertile. That was one of Fukuoka's telling re-discoveries, and seeing it for ourselves in the garden, even in a small way, can be a joy.
         
        Bob Monie
        New Orleans, LA
        Zone 8

        --- On Thu, 12/18/08, Dieter Brand <brand.dieter@...> wrote:

        From: Dieter Brand <brand.dieter@...>
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Sanigouti I turn graph
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, December 18, 2008, 8:23 PM






        In Tokujima prefecture, Japan, a young couple returned to live in the
        country to practice Natural Farming without ploughing as the first
        household in their village. They have documented their adventures in
        pictures since 2000 in these pages:

        http://www1. linkclub. or.jp/~amal/ text/i12. html
        http://www1. linkclub. or.jp/~amal/ text/i3oct. html
        http://www1. linkclub. or.jp/~amal/ text/i4is. html
        http://www1. linkclub. or.jp/~amal/ text/i5tama. html

        As can be seen from several pictures, some vegetables, like cabbages
        and broccoli, didn't grow very well naturally without fertilizers
        because the soil was still too poor in the beginning. That is
        certainly an experience I have made too.

        They built themselves a shed for making bamboo charcoal. Apparently,
        charcoal made from bamboo gives food a special flavour. It is also
        used against electromagnetic waves, to purify water and air and
        against tooth aches.

        The device is also useful for backing sweet potatoes, yakiimo, which
        are a fixed part of traditional life in Japan. The shouts of the
        yakiimo street vendors bring back sweet memories to anyone who ever
        lived in Japan.

        The two with their dog look like they enjoy what they are doing.

        Dieter Brand
        Portugal














        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dieter Brand
        Bob, I m glad you liked it. This is probably not the state of the art but it puts a human face on natural farming especially in Japan which is a universe of
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 19, 2008
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          Bob,

          I'm glad you liked it. This is probably not the state of the art but
          it puts a human face on natural farming especially in Japan which is a
          universe of its own due to the language barrier.

          Dieter


          On 12/19/08, Robert Monie <bobm20001@...> wrote:
          > Dieter,
          >
          > Thanks for reporting these real-life natural farmers from Japan. The
          > expression on their faces tells all. Natural farming is not nirvanah, but
          > it can bring happiness. Roots in the ground (rather than in the compost
          > heap) are naturally fertile. That was one of Fukuoka's telling
          > re-discoveries, and seeing it for ourselves in the garden, even in a small
          > way, can be a joy.
          >
          > Bob Monie
          > New Orleans, LA
          > Zone 8
          >
          > --- On Thu, 12/18/08, Dieter Brand <brand.dieter@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: Dieter Brand <brand.dieter@...>
          > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Sanigouti I turn graph
          > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Thursday, December 18, 2008, 8:23 PM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > In Tokujima prefecture, Japan, a young couple returned to live in the
          > country to practice Natural Farming without ploughing as the first
          > household in their village. They have documented their adventures in
          > pictures since 2000 in these pages:
          >
          > http://www1. linkclub. or.jp/~amal/ text/i12. html
          > http://www1. linkclub. or.jp/~amal/ text/i3oct. html
          > http://www1. linkclub. or.jp/~amal/ text/i4is. html
          > http://www1. linkclub. or.jp/~amal/ text/i5tama. html
          >
          > As can be seen from several pictures, some vegetables, like cabbages
          > and broccoli, didn't grow very well naturally without fertilizers
          > because the soil was still too poor in the beginning. That is
          > certainly an experience I have made too.
          >
          > They built themselves a shed for making bamboo charcoal. Apparently,
          > charcoal made from bamboo gives food a special flavour. It is also
          > used against electromagnetic waves, to purify water and air and
          > against tooth aches.
          >
          > The device is also useful for backing sweet potatoes, yakiimo, which
          > are a fixed part of traditional life in Japan. The shouts of the
          > yakiimo street vendors bring back sweet memories to anyone who ever
          > lived in Japan.
          >
          > The two with their dog look like they enjoy what they are doing.
          >
          > Dieter Brand
          > Portugal
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
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