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Live Fence

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  • Zack Domike
    I am plannning an installation of almost a kilometer of live fence, that is coppice trees to develop into a solid barrier. The conventional material here in
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 9, 2002
      I am plannning an installation of almost a kilometer
      of live fence, that is coppice trees to develop into a
      solid barrier. The conventional material here in the
      south of Chile is Suace Gato, "Pussy Willows" (which I
      did not bother to look up in latin.)

      Unfortunately, I was told yesterday that they attract
      flies. Chile is lucky in that there are very few
      bugs, but flies top the list of distractions.

      Another choice - evergreen - is Privet, or Ligustrina
      in Latin. But I have been told it is slow to start,
      although once established will shoot up 70 cm in a
      season. A fast start is much preferred, especially
      since I am workding with cuttings.

      Do any of you have any info about flies and Pussy
      Willows; or suggestions for the live fence project?

      __________________________________________________
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    • burt levy
      I am going to put a a living fence. It will be blackberries, rasberries, and grapes. It is not to keep animals out. I live in a forest in No. Cal. But to keep
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 12, 2002
        I am going to put a a living fence. It will be
        blackberries, rasberries, and grapes. It is not to
        keep animals out. I live in a forest in No. Cal. But
        to keep my dogs and cats in, so they don't bother the
        wildlife. Deer, rabbits, birds, bears etc. It will
        provide food for me on my side, and food for the
        wildlife on the otherside.
        --- Zack Domike <arcada888@...> wrote:
        > I am plannning an installation of almost a kilometer
        > of live fence, that is coppice trees to develop into
        > a
        > solid barrier. The conventional material here in
        > the
        > south of Chile is Suace Gato, "Pussy Willows" (which
        > I
        > did not bother to look up in latin.)
        >
        > Unfortunately, I was told yesterday that they
        > attract
        > flies. Chile is lucky in that there are very few
        > bugs, but flies top the list of distractions.
        >
        > Another choice - evergreen - is Privet, or
        > Ligustrina
        > in Latin. But I have been told it is slow to start,
        > although once established will shoot up 70 cm in a
        > season. A fast start is much preferred, especially
        > since I am workding with cuttings.
        >
        > Do any of you have any info about flies and Pussy
        > Willows; or suggestions for the live fence project?
        >
        > __________________________________________________
        > Do You Yahoo!?
        > HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
        > http://www.hotjobs.com
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
        http://www.hotjobs.com
      • Jenny & Bob
        Zach- What about Berberis...there are many, many species of Berberis native to your part of the world. Most are thorny. B. darwinii, B. linearifolia, B. x
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 20, 2002
          Zach-

          What about Berberis...there are many, many species of Berberis native to
          your part of the world. Most are thorny. B. darwinii, B. linearifolia, B.
          x stenophylla, B. empetrifolia,... they are beautiful plants as well...they
          all do well here just north of Seattle and just south of Vancouver.

          I think that it is important to try native plants first when tackling a
          project...here in the Pacific Northwest I plant native shrubs and trees for
          buffers/living fences and insect/bird/mammal habitat often. I try to use
          what I see growing ..communities of plants that approximate what I need.
          Here I use Malus fusca (pacific crab apple), Rosa nutkana, Holodiscus
          discolor (Ocean spray) two hawthorns native to the east side of the Cascades
          -Crataegus douglasii and C. suksdorfii, ...others are Alnus rubra (red
          alder) a nitrogen fixer, Spirea douglasii, Mahonia aquifolium, some native
          willows for moist sites, Pinus contorta, Pseudotsuga douglasii...

          I think that plants like the hawthorns and the crab might be 'laid' like a
          hedge...haven't tried it.

          Except for the hawthorns all of these plants grow in the immediate vacinity
          of my garden and the gardens i work in....making combinations of plants
          adapted to your environment is a nice way of gardening appropriately- I
          think!

          good luck...jenny



          > I am plannning an installation of almost a kilometer
          > of live fence, that is coppice trees to develop into a
          > solid barrier. The conventional material here in the
          > south of Chile is Suace Gato, "Pussy Willows" (which I
          > did not bother to look up in latin.)
          >
          > Unfortunately, I was told yesterday that they attract
          > flies. Chile is lucky in that there are very few
          > bugs, but flies top the list of distractions.
          >
          > Another choice - evergreen - is Privet, or Ligustrina
          > in Latin. But I have been told it is slow to start,
          > although once established will shoot up 70 cm in a
          > season. A fast start is much preferred, especially
          > since I am workding with cuttings.
          >
          > Do any of you have any info about flies and Pussy
          > Willows; or suggestions for the live fence project?
          >
          > ________________________________________________
        • souscayrous
          Hello Wendy, if like me you ve been following the spore of an idea, the trace of a pattern in nature, or something only dimly realised in a book or on the
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 24, 2002
            Hello Wendy,
            if like me you've been following the spore of an idea, the trace of a
            pattern in nature, or something only dimly realised in a book or on the
            internet, then the process of moving from our complex western lives back
            toward a source or some fundamentals at least, is an always and ongoing
            process. I suspect that I'm coming closer to that source, though I think I
            would prefer to call it understanding, and I can already see Fukuoka there.
            Your mention of foraging is something I also am thinking more about, the
            move away from planted generic vegetables toward eating the plants found
            wild in each of our landscapes is part of this ongoing process. What I have
            in mind is what Fukuoka established with his semi-wild vegetable garden, a
            garden that seems to have caught the imagination of many on this list, but,
            as yet, with very little success at replication. Perhaps that is because so
            far only Fukuoka has attended to nature (the source) with what Wordsworth
            calls a 'wise passiveness'. Living hedges replicate Fukuoka's thinking but
            only in part.
            Perhaps it would be possible with a little judicious planting to begin to
            emulate Fukuoka's success in our temperate zones by using 'wild' edible
            plants and not 'vegetables'. They would have the robustness to compete and
            succeed in their own milieu and would be perennial. Gradual refinements
            might well lead to turning our gardens into forage gardens that can come to
            provide not just some but all our vegetable needs.
            Is this simply an edible landscape? Or does the intent of providing for all
            our own needs correspond to the usual desire for a vegetable garden?
            Of course we will have to trade our selective taste of modern vegetables for
            what is offered by nature, though Fukuoka makes a good case for this in the
            Natural Way of Farming on p243 Eating With The Seasons. Is anyone attempting
            a fullscale forage garden or building upto it? And if so what are the plants
            you're finding success with and how do you, your family and friends take to
            eating unusual 'wild' plants?
            So many questions, but surely we're all at the beginning and questioning at
            least begins to build a way?


            Souscayrous....being theoretical but with a practical purpose.


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Wendy [mailto:journee@...]
            Sent: Saturday, August 24, 2002 6:04 PM
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Live Fence

            hi Burt,
            I love the living edible living fence idea.
            I'm really into the foraging thing and if planting planting native within
            the forest or other ecosystem. Anyone else out there???

            It's great to have access to folks thinking about all this stuff--- simple
            natural low-impact living...
            thanks,
            wendy
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "burt levy" <redbudburt@...>
            To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, August 12, 2002 11:41 AM
            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Live Fence


            > I am going to put a a living fence. It will be
            > blackberries, rasberries, and grapes. It is not to
            > keep animals out. I live in a forest in No. Cal. But
            > to keep my dogs and cats in, so they don't bother the
            > wildlife. Deer, rabbits, birds, bears etc. It will
            > provide food for me on my side, and food for the
            > wildlife on the otherside.
            > --- Zack Domike <arcada888@...> wrote:
            > > I am plannning an installation of almost a kilometer
            > > of live fence, that is coppice trees to develop into
            > > a
            > > solid barrier. The conventional material here in
            > > the
            > > south of Chile is Suace Gato, "Pussy Willows" (which
            > > I
            > > did not bother to look up in latin.)
            > >
            > > Unfortunately, I was told yesterday that they
            > > attract
            > > flies. Chile is lucky in that there are very few
            > > bugs, but flies top the list of distractions.
            > >
            > > Another choice - evergreen - is Privet, or
            > > Ligustrina
            > > in Latin. But I have been told it is slow to start,
            > > although once established will shoot up 70 cm in a
            > > season. A fast start is much preferred, especially
            > > since I am workding with cuttings.
            > >
            > > Do any of you have any info about flies and Pussy
            > > Willows; or suggestions for the live fence project?
            > >
            > > __________________________________________________
            > > Do You Yahoo!?
            > > HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
            > > http://www.hotjobs.com
            > >
            >
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
            > http://www.hotjobs.com
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >



            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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          • Wendy
            hi Burt, I love the living edible living fence idea. I m really into the foraging thing and if planting planting native within the forest or other ecosystem.
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 24, 2002
              hi Burt,
              I love the living edible living fence idea.
              I'm really into the foraging thing and if planting planting native within
              the forest or other ecosystem. Anyone else out there???

              It's great to have access to folks thinking about all this stuff--- simple
              natural low-impact living...
              thanks,
              wendy
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "burt levy" <redbudburt@...>
              To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, August 12, 2002 11:41 AM
              Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Live Fence


              > I am going to put a a living fence. It will be
              > blackberries, rasberries, and grapes. It is not to
              > keep animals out. I live in a forest in No. Cal. But
              > to keep my dogs and cats in, so they don't bother the
              > wildlife. Deer, rabbits, birds, bears etc. It will
              > provide food for me on my side, and food for the
              > wildlife on the otherside.
              > --- Zack Domike <arcada888@...> wrote:
              > > I am plannning an installation of almost a kilometer
              > > of live fence, that is coppice trees to develop into
              > > a
              > > solid barrier. The conventional material here in
              > > the
              > > south of Chile is Suace Gato, "Pussy Willows" (which
              > > I
              > > did not bother to look up in latin.)
              > >
              > > Unfortunately, I was told yesterday that they
              > > attract
              > > flies. Chile is lucky in that there are very few
              > > bugs, but flies top the list of distractions.
              > >
              > > Another choice - evergreen - is Privet, or
              > > Ligustrina
              > > in Latin. But I have been told it is slow to start,
              > > although once established will shoot up 70 cm in a
              > > season. A fast start is much preferred, especially
              > > since I am workding with cuttings.
              > >
              > > Do any of you have any info about flies and Pussy
              > > Willows; or suggestions for the live fence project?
              > >
              > > __________________________________________________
              > > Do You Yahoo!?
              > > HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
              > > http://www.hotjobs.com
              > >
              >
              >
              > __________________________________________________
              > Do You Yahoo!?
              > HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
              > http://www.hotjobs.com
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
            • Don Graves
              Hi ... / kia ora ... Souscayrous like you say ....ideas grow, mutate & communicate over time & life : eg. patterns in nature ... complexity , ... Euclidian
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 24, 2002
                Hi ... / kia ora ... Souscayrous

                like you say ....ideas grow, mutate & communicate over time & life :
                eg. "patterns in nature"... "complexity", ... Euclidian & "Fractal" geometry

                eg. "simplicity" of seed delivery, seed germination & seedling establishment

                eg. "cyclic evolution" or history of planting tools
                'no-dig' - 'no-weed' hand tools (dibbers, lawn-weeder / sharpened
                screwdriver; "bulb-planters" /corers)
                ..... through conventional tillage (disturbed soils) by spade & ploughs,
                rotary hoes etc
                ... & currently evolving within "conservation-tillage or "no-tillage" seed
                planting methods using mulched undug soils +/- hi-tech / complex machines
                designed for direct placement of seeds with minimal disturbance to
                mycorrhizas & other soil micro-organisms, plants & people

                aroha & peace
                don




                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "souscayrous" <souscayrous@...>
                To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sunday, August 25, 2002 2:01 AM
                Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] Live Fence


                > Hello Wendy,
                > if like me you've been following the spore of an idea, the trace of a
                > pattern in nature, or something only dimly realised in a book or on the
                > internet, then the process of moving from our complex western lives back
                > toward a source or some fundamentals at least, is an always and ongoing
                > process. I suspect that I'm coming closer to that source, though I think I
                > would prefer to call it understanding, and I can already see Fukuoka
                there.
                > Your mention of foraging is something I also am thinking more about, the
                > move away from planted generic vegetables toward eating the plants found
                > wild in each of our landscapes is part of this ongoing process. What I
                have
                > in mind is what Fukuoka established with his semi-wild vegetable garden, a
                > garden that seems to have caught the imagination of many on this list,
                but,
                > as yet, with very little success at replication. Perhaps that is because
                so
                > far only Fukuoka has attended to nature (the source) with what Wordsworth
                > calls a 'wise passiveness'. Living hedges replicate Fukuoka's thinking but
                > only in part.
                > Perhaps it would be possible with a little judicious planting to begin to
                > emulate Fukuoka's success in our temperate zones by using 'wild' edible
                > plants and not 'vegetables'. They would have the robustness to compete and
                > succeed in their own milieu and would be perennial. Gradual refinements
                > might well lead to turning our gardens into forage gardens that can come
                to
                > provide not just some but all our vegetable needs.
                > Is this simply an edible landscape? Or does the intent of providing for
                all
                > our own needs correspond to the usual desire for a vegetable garden?
                > Of course we will have to trade our selective taste of modern vegetables
                for
                > what is offered by nature, though Fukuoka makes a good case for this in
                the
                > Natural Way of Farming on p243 Eating With The Seasons. Is anyone
                attempting
                > a fullscale forage garden or building upto it? And if so what are the
                plants
                > you're finding success with and how do you, your family and friends take
                to
                > eating unusual 'wild' plants?
                > So many questions, but surely we're all at the beginning and questioning
                at
                > least begins to build a way?
                >
                >
                > Souscayrous....being theoretical but with a practical purpose.
                >
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Wendy [mailto:journee@...]
                > Sent: Saturday, August 24, 2002 6:04 PM
                > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Live Fence
                >
                > hi Burt,
                > I love the living edible living fence idea.
                > I'm really into the foraging thing and if planting planting native within
                > the forest or other ecosystem. Anyone else out there???
                >
                > It's great to have access to folks thinking about all this stuff--- simple
                > natural low-impact living...
                > thanks,
                > wendy
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "burt levy" <redbudburt@...>
                > To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Monday, August 12, 2002 11:41 AM
                > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Live Fence
                >
                >
                > > I am going to put a a living fence. It will be
                > > blackberries, rasberries, and grapes. It is not to
                > > keep animals out. I live in a forest in No. Cal. But
                > > to keep my dogs and cats in, so they don't bother the
                > > wildlife. Deer, rabbits, birds, bears etc. It will
                > > provide food for me on my side, and food for the
                > > wildlife on the otherside.
                > > --- Zack Domike <arcada888@...> wrote:
                > > > I am plannning an installation of almost a kilometer
                > > > of live fence, that is coppice trees to develop into
                > > > a
                > > > solid barrier. The conventional material here in
                > > > the
                > > > south of Chile is Suace Gato, "Pussy Willows" (which
                > > > I
                > > > did not bother to look up in latin.)
                > > >
                > > > Unfortunately, I was told yesterday that they
                > > > attract
                > > > flies. Chile is lucky in that there are very few
                > > > bugs, but flies top the list of distractions.
                > > >
                > > > Another choice - evergreen - is Privet, or
                > > > Ligustrina
                > > > in Latin. But I have been told it is slow to start,
                > > > although once established will shoot up 70 cm in a
                > > > season. A fast start is much preferred, especially
                > > > since I am workding with cuttings.
                > > >
                > > > Do any of you have any info about flies and Pussy
                > > > Willows; or suggestions for the live fence project?
                > > >
                > > > __________________________________________________
                > > > Do You Yahoo!?
                > > > HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
                > > > http://www.hotjobs.com
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > > __________________________________________________
                > > Do You Yahoo!?
                > > HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
                > > http://www.hotjobs.com
                > >
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • burt levy
                A couple of points about the living fence idea. Wendy called my idea of using grape vines, rasberry and blackberries, an edible fence. Which is a perfect
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 26, 2002
                  A couple of points about the living fence idea. Wendy
                  called my idea of using grape vines, rasberry and
                  blackberries, an edible fence. Which is a perfect
                  description of it. It not only feeds your family, on
                  your side of the fence. But it also would feed
                  wildlife on the otherside without interfering with our
                  take. It would be very low maintainance, and give you
                  privacy and security. Also you can plant trees around
                  it for more of a wind break. This brings me to the
                  concept of edible or as I call it usable landscaping.
                  The concept being, that 97 percent of the people in
                  the U.S. are not farmers. Most people live on a little
                  tract of land with some type of non usable
                  landscaping. If the general public changed their
                  concept of landscaping from purely ornamental to
                  usable and ornamental at the same time, the benefits
                  to our society and environment would be tremendous.
                  For example people could grow culinary and medicinal
                  herbs that are also beautiful in a landscape.
                  Echinacea, sages, rosemary, lavender and comfrey etc.
                  Can be used in landscaping and used for medicinal teas
                  and in cooking. For shade trees a couple of english
                  walnuts and pecan trees would provide shade in the
                  summer and a whole winter supply of nuts. Fruit trees
                  everywhere providing fruit in some places all year
                  long. Of course a vegatable garden for summer and
                  winter crops. Also getting rid of front lawns which
                  are a tremendous waste of time, money,and water. Also
                  lawns use lots of fertilizers and herbicides. All for
                  something that everyone just walks by on their way
                  into their house. This could be replaced with a ground
                  cover like vinca major which covers well, has nice
                  flowers, and never needs to be mowed. It doesn't climb
                  everywhere and is also medicinal. I believe that back
                  yard lawns have a use. That is where people have
                  barbeques. Their kids play, their dogs run around etc.
                  However nobody does anything on their front lawn.
                  Throw a few chickens back there and you can be fairly
                  self sufficient with healthy foods from a typical
                  tract home yard. This type of landscape uses less
                  water. Has far less maintanence, and of course
                  wouldn't use pesticides or herbicides which run of
                  into our streams and leaches into our ground water.
                  Also it gives back in daily food that is healthier
                  than any store bought food. You save money on your
                  food bill. And you and your family learn how to work
                  with nature to provide for your needs.
                  --- Wendy <journee@...> wrote:
                  > hi Burt,
                  > I love the living edible living fence idea.
                  > I'm really into the foraging thing and if planting
                  > planting native within
                  > the forest or other ecosystem. Anyone else out
                  > there???
                  >
                  > It's great to have access to folks thinking about
                  > all this stuff--- simple
                  > natural low-impact living...
                  > thanks,
                  > wendy
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "burt levy" <redbudburt@...>
                  > To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
                  > Sent: Monday, August 12, 2002 11:41 AM
                  > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Live Fence
                  >
                  >
                  > > I am going to put a a living fence. It will be
                  > > blackberries, rasberries, and grapes. It is not to
                  > > keep animals out. I live in a forest in No. Cal.
                  > But
                  > > to keep my dogs and cats in, so they don't bother
                  > the
                  > > wildlife. Deer, rabbits, birds, bears etc. It will
                  > > provide food for me on my side, and food for the
                  > > wildlife on the otherside.
                  > > --- Zack Domike <arcada888@...> wrote:
                  > > > I am plannning an installation of almost a
                  > kilometer
                  > > > of live fence, that is coppice trees to develop
                  > into
                  > > > a
                  > > > solid barrier. The conventional material here
                  > in
                  > > > the
                  > > > south of Chile is Suace Gato, "Pussy Willows"
                  > (which
                  > > > I
                  > > > did not bother to look up in latin.)
                  > > >
                  > > > Unfortunately, I was told yesterday that they
                  > > > attract
                  > > > flies. Chile is lucky in that there are very
                  > few
                  > > > bugs, but flies top the list of distractions.
                  > > >
                  > > > Another choice - evergreen - is Privet, or
                  > > > Ligustrina
                  > > > in Latin. But I have been told it is slow to
                  > start,
                  > > > although once established will shoot up 70 cm in
                  > a
                  > > > season. A fast start is much preferred,
                  > especially
                  > > > since I am workding with cuttings.
                  > > >
                  > > > Do any of you have any info about flies and
                  > Pussy
                  > > > Willows; or suggestions for the live fence
                  > project?
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > __________________________________________________
                  > > > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > > > HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
                  > > > http://www.hotjobs.com
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > __________________________________________________
                  > > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > > HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
                  > > http://www.hotjobs.com
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >


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