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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Natural Farming project in Japan

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  • David Keltie
    Thanks very much for this reference. I don t read Japanese but a picture is worth a 1000 words . I m intrigued to see how much the vegetable beds look like my
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 14, 2008
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      Thanks very much for this reference. I don't read Japanese but 'a
      picture is worth a 1000 words'.

      I'm intrigued to see how much the vegetable beds look like my own
      despite the differences of culture/climates. Suggests there may be
      some more universal elements to Natural farming than might be thought!

      Thanks David.

      On Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 7:03 PM, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:
      >
      > There is a blog in Japanese on a Natural Farming project called Alpha at:
      >
      > http://blog.goo.ne.jp/tanbo123/
      >
      > The page has nearly 200 pictures and takes forever to download if you have a slow Internet connection like me.
      >
      > Volunteers come to the farm in Saitama prefecture on Saturdays. The blog started in December 2007 and has documented everything in detail: meeting place and date, list of members, work done, weather, anecdotes, work-schedule for the following time and even what food was served. There is of course always the obligatory group photograph.
      >
      > This project follows the Kawaguchi school of Natural Farming in Japan, which means no-till, no-fertilizers and no-chemicals. Different from Fukuoka, rice is first grown in a seedbed and then transplanted into a paddy field. There is also some weeding. Most natural farmers in Japan seem to follow this method.
      >
      > The Japanese date format is xxxx (year) xx (month) xx (day)
      > (They mixed up the dates a little)
      >
      > Dewa, ikimasho!
      >
      > (If you want to read in chronological order you have to read from bottom to top)
      >
      > 2008 – 10 – 11
      > Garden work, cutting bamboo for drying rice straw.
      > 2008 – 8 – 9
      > Cutting grass around paddy, frog eats earthworm, weeding between pumpkin, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, etc.;
      > 2008 – 7 – 19
      > Weeding paddy, harvesting Edamame and potatoes, pumpkin, tomatoes, sweet potatoes;
      > 2008 – 7 – 5
      > Paddy field with water, weeding paddy field, weeding around vegetables, Edamame, etc., tomatoe volunteer, transplanting sweet potatoes, dried potato green (poor growth due to poor lack of fertility);
      > 2008 – 6 – 21
      > Transplanting rice;
      > 2008 – 5 – 31
      > Cutting grass, mulching around Satoimo, Edamame (beans), leaks, strawberries, potatoes, etc., weeding between rice;
      > 2007 – 5 -10
      > Cutting grass, potato plant, bean plant, mulching strawberries, planting more Satoimo, young rice plants;
      > 2008 – 4 – 19
      > Removing straw, loosening soil with hoe (5 cm), sowing rice, covering with dry soil, covering with straw, protecting against sparrows, cutting grass around potatoes, planting Satoimo (taro), sowing beans;
      > 2007 – 3 – 29
      > Digging trenches for paddy field, Hanami (Japanese cherry blossom viewing);
      > 2007 – 03 – 1
      > Planting potatoes, preparing seedbed for rice, spreading rice bran, covering seedbed with straw;
      > 2007 – 02 – 9
      > Spreading rice bran on the fields, making omochi (traditional Japanese rice cakes) for the New Year;
      > 2007 – 12 – 1
      > Threshing rice, spreading straw, harvesting daikon radishes, rice bowls with side dishes;
      >
      > Yoroshiku onegai shimasu.
      >
      > Dieter Brand
      > Portugal
      >
      > PS: This project allows city people to get a hands-on experience, but is not necessarily representative of Natural Farming in Japan. Farmers who work and live on their land every day can come up with far more creative solutions for growing food in accord with nature.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
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