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Planting Broadbeans - advice

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  • adrianaudsley
    I am organising a community planting activity in a couple of days time - planting broadbeans into a disused allotment that belongs to our local church in SW
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 13, 2008
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      I am organising a community planting activity in a couple of days time -
      planting broadbeans into a disused allotment that belongs to our local
      church in SW London England. We probably only have the plot for six
      months as it is earmarked for development

      The plan is to have a spring crop of broad beans with minimum effort in
      planting and maintenance. The plot has good soil - fairly easy to
      work but hasn't been used for three years and so is thick with
      bindweed, couch grass and plenty of brambles. A couple of old compost
      heaps look like they can be incorporated.

      So I am wondering how much to clear from the surface and how much of
      the roots to try to remove. The recommended sowing is in two double
      rows a meter apart with individual beans at 22 cms spacing and 5 cms
      deep

      Any advice welcome and any suggestions of anything else we could plant
      now.
    • David Keltie
      In my garden, I just cut off and chop all the weeds at ground level, leave them on the surface and plant seeds straight into the ground (brambles you might
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 13, 2008
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        In my garden, I just cut off and chop all the weeds at ground level,
        leave them on the surface and plant seeds straight into the ground
        (brambles you might want to shred or cut into small pieces first!).

        As the beans grow, I just keep cutting and dropping the weeds.
        Eventually the weeds get pretty much shaded out by the growing beans.

        With other crops, I'm troubled by the slugs that lurk in the decaying
        weeds but the broad beans seem untouched. You could use layers of
        newspaper first on top of the cut weeds and plant into holes cut in
        it, if you don't want to be bothered to keep cutting. But then you
        need to secure the paper and/or cover with a mulch.

        HTH, David (in Herefordshire).

        On Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 2:19 PM, adrianaudsley
        <adrianaudsley@...> wrote:
        > I am organising a community planting activity in a couple of days time -
        > planting broadbeans into a disused allotment that belongs to our local
        > church in SW London England. We probably only have the plot for six
        > months as it is earmarked for development
        >
        > The plan is to have a spring crop of broad beans with minimum effort in
        > planting and maintenance. The plot has good soil - fairly easy to
        > work but hasn't been used for three years and so is thick with
        > bindweed, couch grass and plenty of brambles. A couple of old compost
        > heaps look like they can be incorporated.
        >
        > So I am wondering how much to clear from the surface and how much of
        > the roots to try to remove. The recommended sowing is in two double
        > rows a meter apart with individual beans at 22 cms spacing and 5 cms
        > deep
        >
        > Any advice welcome and any suggestions of anything else we could plant
        > now.
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Dieter Brand
        Adrian,   Broad beans are the best choice for a winter-annual legume (at least where I live) because they: - fix N, - don t mind a little frost; - grow
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 13, 2008
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          Adrian,
           
          Broad beans are the best choice for a winter-annual legume (at least where I live) because they:
          - fix N,
          - don't mind a little frost;
          - grow faster and produce more biomass than most annuals during winter;
          - are a delicacy when peeled (lot of work);
          - taste a bit rough without peeling;
          - for planting see my message to Guenther:
          (broad beans: in wet garden soil, punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; in dry soil: difficult without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not shredded) may help in some cases;)
          - if you don't have a problem with black birds, you don't need to go that deep;
          - with enough humidity and soil cover (mulch, vegetation) they will even germinate on top of soil if not eaten by worms;
          - you don't have to remove anything;
          - I punch individual holes to avoid soil disturbance (can be hard on the back);
          - drilling may be easier but more soil disturbance;
          - pre-germination (2 to 24 h) can help if too dry (unlikely in London);
          - I plant closer than anybody (a foot or less); as cover crop or green manure it doesn't matter, for eating or harvesting seeds I thin out later;
          - they will grow through 6 to 12 inches of vegetation, if higher, cut or trample down vegetation a week after planting;
          - I plant from Aug. through Nov. between the summer vegetables (by the time I harvest the summer vegetables, the garden is already covered with broad beans and lupines);
          - broad beans will develop aphids when it gets warmer in April or May, hence early planting is preferable.
           
          Cheers, Dieter


          --- On Thu, 11/13/08, adrianaudsley <adrianaudsley@...> wrote:

          From: adrianaudsley <adrianaudsley@...>
          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Planting Broadbeans - advice
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 2:19 PM






          I am organising a community planting activity in a couple of days time -
          planting broadbeans into a disused allotment that belongs to our local
          church in SW London England. We probably only have the plot for six
          months as it is earmarked for development

          The plan is to have a spring crop of broad beans with minimum effort in
          planting and maintenance. The plot has good soil - fairly easy to
          work but hasn't been used for three years and so is thick with
          bindweed, couch grass and plenty of brambles. A couple of old compost
          heaps look like they can be incorporated.

          So I am wondering how much to clear from the surface and how much of
          the roots to try to remove. The recommended sowing is in two double
          rows a meter apart with individual beans at 22 cms spacing and 5 cms
          deep

          Any advice welcome and any suggestions of anything else we could plant
          now.


















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