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Seedballs and mice

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  • gunther1753
    Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden. they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs containing broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas. i even
    Message 1 of 24 , Nov 12, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
      they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs containing
      broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
      i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
      peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
      so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
      greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring, and
      then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
      it seems like a no win situation.
      how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.

      regards guenther
    • Jean Villafuerte
      Try raising cats for your rats. I don t know a biological control for slugs. jean www.ammado.com/pfi www.ormocwomen.blogspot.com www.evyouth.blogspot.com
      Message 2 of 24 , Nov 12, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Try raising cats for your rats. I don't know a biological control for slugs.

        jean
        www.ammado.com/pfi
        www.ormocwomen.blogspot.com
        www.evyouth.blogspot.com
        www.tcfoc.blogspot.com
        www.pfi.blogspot.com
        www.geocities.com/pfft_2000

        visit my blogs and leave your comments.





        ________________________________
        From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 1:21:08 AM
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice


        Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
        they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs containing
        broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
        i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
        peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
        so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
        greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring, and
        then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
        it seems like a no win situation.
        how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.

        regards guenther






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Shawn Turner
        You dont have a rat problem!  You have a lack of Raptor habitat.  You need to encourge, Owls, hawks, etc.  They will do more good than the cats.  Cats will
        Message 3 of 24 , Nov 13, 2008
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          You dont have a rat problem!  You have a lack of Raptor habitat.  You need to encourge, Owls, hawks, etc.  They will do more good than the cats.  Cats will kill everything including precious native song birds.  Raptors are much better at kill rats, than cats.  They will not destroy your native birds, frogs, lizards, toads.  These animals are the ones that will fix your slug problem!




          ________________________________
          From: Jean Villafuerte <dayjean455@...>
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2008 8:41:51 PM
          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice


          Try raising cats for your rats. I don't know a biological control for slugs.

          jean
          www.ammado.com/ pfi
          www.ormocwomen. blogspot. com
          www.evyouth. blogspot. com
          www.tcfoc.blogspot. com
          www.pfi.blogspot. com
          www.geocities. com/pfft_ 2000

          visit my blogs and leave your comments.

          ____________ _________ _________ __
          From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ btinternet. com>
          To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 1:21:08 AM
          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice

          Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
          they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs containing
          broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
          i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
          peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
          so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
          greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring, and
          then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
          it seems like a no win situation.
          how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.

          regards guenther

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dieter Brand
          Jean,   Cats can solve a problem or create one: - some hunt, some don’t (it’s in the genes); - generally females are good hunters (tom cats have other
          Message 4 of 24 , Nov 13, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Jean,

            Cats can solve a problem or create one:
            - some hunt, some don�t (it�s in the genes);
            - generally females are good hunters�(tom cats have other urges);
            - some like mice, some like birds � (a tom cat we had even went after voles);
            - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
            - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the lizards etc.;
            - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
            - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I feed them.

            Guenther,

            Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.� I don�t know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)

            In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
            - seedballs don�t work very well (not enough or too much rain);
            - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
            - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not active (Nov. 15 � Mar.)
            - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect from birds but not from ants;
            - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most seeds will germinate before eaten;
            - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse sand for small seeds);
            - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea), especially when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
            - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not shredded) may help in some cases;
            - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
            - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too late (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first rains);

            There is no magic solution to pest problems:
            - develop integrated system by close observation;
            - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
            - don�t overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
            - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can�t get through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my winter vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish greens 2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
            - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) �
            - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.

            Good luck,

            Concisely yours,
            Dieter

            PS: Shawn, cats don�t touch toads, if you ever kissed one to awaken a prince you know why.


            --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:

            From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
            Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM






            Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
            they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs containing
            broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
            i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
            peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
            so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
            greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring, and
            then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
            it seems like a no win situation.
            how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.

            regards guenther


















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • gunther1753
            -Hello Dieter i very much appreciate your reply and advice. My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild winters, lots of rain. All in all,
            Message 5 of 24 , Nov 13, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              -Hello Dieter
              i very much appreciate your reply and advice.
              My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild
              winters, lots of rain. All in all, i'm not doing that bad. It's just
              that exeptional mice population. Even there are plenty of birds of
              prey, they don't seem to have much impact.
              Next spring i plan to plant buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth by cutting
              the existing grass down to ground level, and broadcasting seed
              pellets, mulching with the cut grass.(there is no problem for
              moisture here) Any opinion on that?

              thanks and regards
              guenther


              -- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Jean,
              >  
              > Cats can solve a problem or create one:
              > - some hunt, some don't (it's in the genes);
              > - generally females are good hunters (tom cats have other urges);
              > - some like mice, some like birds … (a tom cat we had even went
              after voles);
              > - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
              > - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the
              lizards etc.;
              > - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the
              garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
              > - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I
              feed them.
              >  
              > Guenther,
              >  
              > Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what
              Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.  I don't
              know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)
              >  
              > In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
              > - seedballs don't work very well (not enough or too much rain);
              > - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains
              (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
              > - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect
              every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not
              active (Nov. 15 – Mar.)
              > - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect from
              birds but not from ants;
              > - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most
              seeds will germinate before eaten;
              > - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse sand
              for small seeds);
              > - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of
              the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea), especially
              when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
              > - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop
              in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult
              without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not
              shredded) may help in some cases;
              > - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow
              with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with
              soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
              > - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-
              tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too
              early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too late
              (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within
              less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first
              rains);
              >  
              > There is no magic solution to pest problems:
              > - develop integrated system by close observation;
              > - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant
              but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
              > - don't overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
              > - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make
              nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before
              sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can't get
              through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails
              are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails
              will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my winter
              vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish greens
              2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
              > - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large
              trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) …
              > - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better
              stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.
              >  
              > Good luck,
              >  
              > Concisely yours,
              > Dieter
              >  
              > PS: Shawn, cats don't touch toads, if you ever kissed one to awaken
              a prince you know why.
              >  
              >
              > --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:
              >
              > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
              > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
              > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
              > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
              containing
              > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
              > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
              > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
              > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
              > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
              and
              > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
              > it seems like a no win situation.
              > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
              >
              > regards guenther
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Dieter Brand
              Guenther,   I envy you all that rain.  During my ill-spent youth in London, I had a friend who lived in a hole in the ground for a few years, I think it was
              Message 6 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Guenther,

                I envy you all that rain.� During my ill-spent youth in London, I had a friend who lived in a hole in the ground for a few years, I think it was in a large forest in Cornwell or somewhere around there.� He mainly lived on wild roots and berries and would come into town only once in a while.

                I never tried quinoa and amaranth except for a few plants in the garden.� What is amazing with quinoa is that it starts germinating a couple of hours after it gets wet.� But the seeds are so small that they may not do well in existing vegetation.� Hope you keep us informed.

                Buckwheat is fairly easy though, takes a bit longer to germinate, but grows extremely fast, about 3 months to harvest; which is because of the short summers in Russia where it is a staple.� But you need to be careful about cold.� It is killed off as soon the temps approach 0 deg. C.� But weed-suppressing properties are not very good.� I think I must have used cut grass and weeds from 2 to 3 acres just to mulch one acre. �But the buckwheat was still completely grown-in by weeds.� But that my also be because native annuals here grow extremely fast when it gets wet, a bit like the desert starting to bloom after a rain.� Mind you it is not a desert, far from it.� All in all it�s not useful here, too dry in the summer, to cold in the winter.� In fall and spring other plants do better.

                Did you try dinkel?� I�m just reading Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century nun.� She thinks that dinkel is about the healthiest thing we can eat.� I didn�t check it, but I suppose it would be a cold season-annual grain around here.� Right now I�m stuck with a job, but if I can manage I want to sow some dinkel this month before it gets too late to sow cold-season grains.

                Cheers, Dieter

                PS:� About your mice, perhaps the only thing left is a cat.� With all their drawbacks, cats have been part of homestead environment for centuries, there is no reason to suppose that, if you take them away, the mice population won�t explode.� If you know the parents, you can usually tell if they hunt or not.� As I said, females are a safer bet.� Don�t get a city pet, get one from a farmer that�s used to roaming freely.



                --- On Thu, 11/13/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:

                From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
                Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 8:23 PM






                -Hello Dieter
                i very much appreciate your reply and advice.
                My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild
                winters, lots of rain. All in all, i'm not doing that bad. It's just
                that exeptional mice population. Even there are plenty of birds of
                prey, they don't seem to have much impact.
                Next spring i plan to plant buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth by cutting
                the existing grass down to ground level, and broadcasting seed
                pellets, mulching with the cut grass.(there is no problem for
                moisture here) Any opinion on that?

                thanks and regards
                guenther


                -- In fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@.. .>
                wrote:
                >
                > Jean,
                > �
                > Cats can solve a problem or create one:
                > - some hunt, some don't (it's in the genes);
                > - generally females are good hunters�(tom cats have other urges);
                > - some like mice, some like birds � (a tom cat we had even went
                after voles);
                > - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
                > - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the
                lizards etc.;
                > - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the
                garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
                > - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I
                feed them.
                > �
                > Guenther,
                > �
                > Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what
                Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.� I don't
                know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)
                > �
                > In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
                > - seedballs don't work very well (not enough or too much rain);
                > - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains
                (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
                > - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect
                every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not
                active (Nov. 15 � Mar.)
                > - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect from
                birds but not from ants;
                > - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most
                seeds will germinate before eaten;
                > - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse sand
                for small seeds);
                > - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of
                the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea), especially
                when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
                > - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop
                in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult
                without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not
                shredded) may help in some cases;
                > - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow
                with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with
                soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
                > - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-
                tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too
                early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too late
                (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within
                less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first
                rains);
                > �
                > There is no magic solution to pest problems:
                > - develop integrated system by close observation;
                > - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant
                but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
                > - don't overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
                > - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make
                nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before
                sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can't get
                through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails
                are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails
                will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my winter
                vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish greens
                2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
                > - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large
                trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) �
                > - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better
                stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.
                > �
                > Good luck,
                > �
                > Concisely yours,
                > Dieter
                > �
                > PS: Shawn, cats don't touch toads, if you ever kissed one to awaken
                a prince you know why.
                > �
                >
                > --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...>
                > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
                > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                > Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
                containing
                > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
                and
                > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                > it seems like a no win situation.
                > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                >
                > regards guenther
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >


















                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Robert Monie
                Hi Dieter,   Let me join others in thanking you for the website of those devotees who gather in Japan each weekend to do natural farming and are brave and
                Message 7 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Dieter,

                  Let me join others in thanking you for the website of those devotees who gather in Japan each weekend to do natural farming and are brave and honest enough to record all their activities. They are a good antidote to�temptation to be a luftmensch�and try to farm with�your head above the clouds too high to see�which crops are and are not growing�on the ground below. �At his best, Fukuoka had his eyes on the ground, inside the ground even, and inside the plant.

                  Dinkel is probably Triticum spelta or spelt grain. Hildegard said "spelt is the best of grains. It produces a strong body and healthy blood in those who use it, and it makes the spirit of man light and cheerful. If someone is ill, boil some spelt, mix it with egg and this will heal him like a fine ointment." A scientific analysis of spelt�(beginning at page 193�of Jules Janick's online work "Plant�Breeding Review") can be read�by google.comming to
                  "A total of 254 ha of spelt were certified...."� The analysis features an excellent photo�of spelt�and spelt seeds alongside�common wheat wheat and�wheat seeds.�A little on the antiquity of dinkel/spelt appears at http://www.spelt.com/greeks.html.

                  By the way, have you read any good books lately on natural farming in Japan?

                  Bob Monie
                  New Orleans, LA
                  Zone 8

                  --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:

                  From: Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
                  Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                  To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 5:17 AM

                  Guenther,

                  I envy you all that rain.� During my ill-spent youth in London, I had a friend
                  who lived in a hole in the ground for a few years, I think it was in a large
                  forest in Cornwell or somewhere around there.� He mainly lived on wild roots
                  and berries and would come into town only once in a while.

                  I never tried quinoa and amaranth except for a few plants in the garden.� What
                  is amazing with quinoa is that it starts germinating a couple of hours after it
                  gets wet.� But the seeds are so small that they may not do well in existing
                  vegetation.� Hope you keep us informed.

                  Buckwheat is fairly easy though, takes a bit longer to germinate, but grows
                  extremely fast, about 3 months to harvest; which is because of the short summers
                  in Russia where it is a staple.� But you need to be careful about cold.� It is
                  killed off as soon the temps approach 0 deg. C.� But weed-suppressing
                  properties are not very good.� I think I must have used cut grass and weeds
                  from 2 to 3 acres just to mulch one acre. �But the buckwheat was still
                  completely grown-in by weeds.� But that my also be because native annuals here
                  grow extremely fast when it gets wet, a bit like the desert starting to bloom
                  after a rain.� Mind you it is not a desert, far from it.� All in all it�s
                  not useful here, too dry in the summer, to cold in the winter.� In fall and
                  spring other plants do better.

                  Did you try dinkel?� I�m just reading Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century
                  nun.� She thinks that dinkel is about the healthiest thing we can eat.� I
                  didn�t check it, but I suppose it would be a cold season-annual grain around
                  here.� Right now I�m stuck with a job, but if I can manage I want to sow some
                  dinkel this month before it gets too late to sow cold-season grains.

                  Cheers, Dieter

                  PS:� About your mice, perhaps the only thing left is a cat.� With all their
                  drawbacks, cats have been part of homestead environment for centuries, there is
                  no reason to suppose that, if you take them away, the mice population won�t
                  explode.� If you know the parents, you can usually tell if they hunt or not.�
                  As I said, females are a safer bet.� Don�t get a city pet, get one from a
                  farmer that�s used to roaming freely.



                  --- On Thu, 11/13/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:

                  From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
                  Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                  To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 8:23 PM






                  -Hello Dieter
                  i very much appreciate your reply and advice.
                  My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild
                  winters, lots of rain. All in all, i'm not doing that bad. It's just
                  that exeptional mice population. Even there are plenty of birds of
                  prey, they don't seem to have much impact.
                  Next spring i plan to plant buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth by cutting
                  the existing grass down to ground level, and broadcasting seed
                  pellets, mulching with the cut grass.(there is no problem for
                  moisture here) Any opinion on that?

                  thanks and regards
                  guenther


                  -- In fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@.. .>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Jean,
                  > �
                  > Cats can solve a problem or create one:
                  > - some hunt, some don't (it's in the genes);
                  > - generally females are good hunters�(tom cats have other urges);
                  > - some like mice, some like birds � (a tom cat we had even went
                  after voles);
                  > - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
                  > - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the
                  lizards etc.;
                  > - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the
                  garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
                  > - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I
                  feed them.
                  > �
                  > Guenther,
                  > �
                  > Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what
                  Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.� I don't
                  know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)
                  > �
                  > In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
                  > - seedballs don't work very well (not enough or too much rain);
                  > - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains
                  (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
                  > - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect
                  every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not
                  active (Nov. 15 � Mar.)
                  > - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect from
                  birds but not from ants;
                  > - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most
                  seeds will germinate before eaten;
                  > - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse sand
                  for small seeds);
                  > - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of
                  the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea), especially
                  when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
                  > - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop
                  in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult
                  without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not
                  shredded) may help in some cases;
                  > - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow
                  with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with
                  soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
                  > - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-
                  tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too
                  early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too late
                  (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within
                  less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first
                  rains);
                  > �
                  > There is no magic solution to pest problems:
                  > - develop integrated system by close observation;
                  > - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant
                  but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
                  > - don't overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
                  > - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make
                  nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before
                  sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can't get
                  through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails
                  are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails
                  will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my winter
                  vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish greens
                  2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
                  > - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large
                  trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) �
                  > - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better
                  stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.
                  > �
                  > Good luck,
                  > �
                  > Concisely yours,
                  > Dieter
                  > �
                  > PS: Shawn, cats don't touch toads, if you ever kissed one to awaken
                  a prince you know why.
                  > �
                  >
                  > --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...>
                  > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
                  > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                  > Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                  > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
                  containing
                  > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                  > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                  > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                  > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                  > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
                  and
                  > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                  > it seems like a no win situation.
                  > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                  >
                  > regards guenther
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >


















                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                  ------------------------------------

                  Yahoo! Groups Links





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • gunther1753
                  ... You reminded me, that quinoa and amaranth are supposed to be started in a seedbed or even in cells. that would be a lot of work. The buckwheat, i might
                  Message 8 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
                    wrote:
                    >Hi Dieter
                    You reminded me, that quinoa and amaranth are supposed to be started
                    in a seedbed or even in cells. that would be a lot of work.
                    The buckwheat, i might start between the braodbeans and peas, before
                    harvest in may. (if i get them going in numbers)
                    For my grass meadow (grass, dandelion, sorrel,plantain etc.) i still
                    don't know, what kind of grain would be easiest to establish without
                    tilling. maybe i should get lots of white clover in first?
                    Dinkel is Spelt in english? i havent managed to get any seeds yet.
                    Also an old yariety of oats could be nice. (?)
                    best regards

                    PS: how about swopping some sunshine for some rain?

                    > Guenther,
                    >  
                    > I envy you all that rain.  During my ill-spent youth in London, I
                    had a friend who lived in a hole in the ground for a few years, I
                    think it was in a large forest in Cornwell or somewhere around
                    there.  He mainly lived on wild roots and berries and would come into
                    town only once in a while.
                    >  
                    > I never tried quinoa and amaranth except for a few plants in the
                    garden.  What is amazing with quinoa is that it starts germinating a
                    couple of hours after it gets wet.  But the seeds are so small that
                    they may not do well in existing vegetation.  Hope you keep us
                    informed.
                    >  
                    > Buckwheat is fairly easy though, takes a bit longer to germinate,
                    but grows extremely fast, about 3 months to harvest; which is because
                    of the short summers in Russia where it is a staple.  But you need to
                    be careful about cold.  It is killed off as soon the temps approach 0
                    deg. C.  But weed-suppressing properties are not very good.  I think
                    I must have used cut grass and weeds from 2 to 3 acres just to mulch
                    one acre.  But the buckwheat was still completely grown-in by weeds. 
                    But that my also be because native annuals here grow extremely fast
                    when it gets wet, a bit like the desert starting to bloom after a
                    rain.  Mind you it is not a desert, far from it.  All in all it's not
                    useful here, too dry in the summer, to cold in the winter.  In fall
                    and spring other plants do better.
                    >  
                    > Did you try dinkel?  I'm just reading Hildegard von Bingen, the
                    12th century nun.  She thinks that dinkel is about the healthiest
                    thing we can eat.  I didn't check it, but I suppose it would be a
                    cold season-annual grain around here.  Right now I'm stuck with a
                    job, but if I can manage I want to sow some dinkel this month before
                    it gets too late to sow cold-season grains.
                    >  
                    > Cheers, Dieter
                    >  
                    > PS:  About your mice, perhaps the only thing left is a cat.  With
                    all their drawbacks, cats have been part of homestead environment for
                    centuries, there is no reason to suppose that, if you take them away,
                    the mice population won't explode.  If you know the parents, you can
                    usually tell if they hunt or not.  As I said, females are a safer
                    bet.  Don't get a city pet, get one from a farmer that's used to
                    roaming freely.
                    >  
                    >  
                    >  
                    > --- On Thu, 11/13/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
                    > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                    > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 8:23 PM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > -Hello Dieter
                    > i very much appreciate your reply and advice.
                    > My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild
                    > winters, lots of rain. All in all, i'm not doing that bad. It's
                    just
                    > that exeptional mice population. Even there are plenty of birds of
                    > prey, they don't seem to have much impact.
                    > Next spring i plan to plant buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth by
                    cutting
                    > the existing grass down to ground level, and broadcasting seed
                    > pellets, mulching with the cut grass.(there is no problem for
                    > moisture here) Any opinion on that?
                    >
                    > thanks and regards
                    > guenther
                    >
                    >
                    > -- In fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@ .>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Jean,
                    > >  
                    > > Cats can solve a problem or create one:
                    > > - some hunt, some don't (it's in the genes);
                    > > - generally females are good hunters (tom cats have other urges);
                    > > - some like mice, some like birds … (a tom cat we had even went
                    > after voles);
                    > > - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
                    > > - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the
                    > lizards etc.;
                    > > - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the
                    > garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
                    > > - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I
                    > feed them.
                    > >  
                    > > Guenther,
                    > >  
                    > > Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what
                    > Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.  I don't
                    > know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)
                    > >  
                    > > In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
                    > > - seedballs don't work very well (not enough or too much rain);
                    > > - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains
                    > (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
                    > > - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect
                    > every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not
                    > active (Nov. 15 – Mar.)
                    > > - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect
                    from
                    > birds but not from ants;
                    > > - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most
                    > seeds will germinate before eaten;
                    > > - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse
                    sand
                    > for small seeds);
                    > > - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of
                    > the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea),
                    especially
                    > when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
                    > > - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop
                    > in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult
                    > without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not
                    > shredded) may help in some cases;
                    > > - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow
                    > with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with
                    > soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
                    > > - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-
                    > tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too
                    > early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too
                    late
                    > (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within
                    > less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first
                    > rains);
                    > >  
                    > > There is no magic solution to pest problems:
                    > > - develop integrated system by close observation;
                    > > - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant
                    > but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
                    > > - don't overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
                    > > - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make
                    > nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before
                    > sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can't get
                    > through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails
                    > are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails
                    > will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my
                    winter
                    > vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish
                    greens
                    > 2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
                    > > - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large
                    > trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) …
                    > > - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better
                    > stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.
                    > >  
                    > > Good luck,
                    > >  
                    > > Concisely yours,
                    > > Dieter
                    > >  
                    > > PS: Shawn, cats don't touch toads, if you ever kissed one to
                    awaken
                    > a prince you know why.
                    > >  
                    > >
                    > > --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...>
                    > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
                    > > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                    > > Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                    > > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
                    > containing
                    > > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                    > > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                    > > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                    > > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                    > > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
                    > and
                    > > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                    > > it seems like a no win situation.
                    > > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                    > >
                    > > regards guenther
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Dieter Brand
                    Bob,   I’m glad those pictures from the homeland of Natural Farming were of some use.  I have a few more things in the works, but being stuck with a
                    Message 9 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Bob,

                      I�m glad those pictures from the homeland of Natural Farming were of some use.� I have a few more things in the works, but being stuck with a technical text, I won�t get it ready before the end of the month.

                      I started on the second book by Kawaguchi, in fact it is not entirely written by him.� It is a series of texts by different Natural Farmers, with Kawaguchi acting as editor or coordinator.� While the first one has a lot of Shinto- and forces-in-nature stuff, this one is more practical.� It is in fact, as I only discovered afterwards, about the same group of people portrayed in the collection of photographs.� Last night I had a look at the 3rd article (that cool looking couple with their kids, the Satos, pp. 32-37 in your book).� She wrote it.� She seems to be a lot into weed/vegetable companion growing.� She said she grew carrots, of all things, in a field of mehishiba, my dictionary gives crab grass.� I still can�t believe it, and I will cross check the botanical names.� I don�t know how different crab grass is from European quack grass, but if I could grow carrots in that, I would really make it big time.� Apart from weeds she also uses
                      wheat for companion growing.� With staged planting, the vegetables can take advantage of the decaying wheat roots when they mature after the wheat has been harvested.� There are diagrams and instructions about when to cut.� When I get some time I will introduce some of it.

                      I only just started with Hildegard von Bingen.� I was a little skeptical at first, since it has become a bit of a fashion.� But she does seem to have a deep understanding of the relation between individual food stuffs and health.� Not bad for the Middle Ages.� I don�t have the time and bandwidth to follow-up your links, but I do like to learn more about it and find out if science finally caught up ;-)

                      Dieter Brand
                      Portugal


                      --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Robert Monie <bobm20001@...> wrote:

                      From: Robert Monie <bobm20001@...>
                      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Dinkel and the mystic herbalist Hildegard
                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 4:12 PM

                      Hi Dieter,

                      Let me join others in thanking you for the website of those devotees who gather
                      in Japan each weekend to do natural farming and are brave and honest enough to
                      record all their activities. They are a good antidote to�temptation to be a
                      luftmensch�and try to farm with�your head above the clouds too high to
                      see�which crops are and are not growing�on the ground below. �At his best,
                      Fukuoka had his eyes on the ground, inside the ground even, and inside the
                      plant.

                      Dinkel is probably Triticum spelta or spelt grain. Hildegard said "spelt
                      is the best of grains. It produces a strong body and healthy blood in those who
                      use it, and it makes the spirit of man light and cheerful. If someone is ill,
                      boil some spelt, mix it with egg and this will heal him like a fine
                      ointment." A scientific analysis of spelt�(beginning at page 193�of Jules
                      Janick's online work "Plant�Breeding Review") can be read�by
                      google.comming to
                      "A total of 254 ha of spelt were certified...."� The analysis
                      features an excellent photo�of spelt�and spelt seeds alongside�common wheat
                      wheat and�wheat seeds.�A little on the antiquity of dinkel/spelt appears at
                      http://www.spelt.com/greeks.html.

                      By the way, have you read any good books lately on natural farming in Japan?

                      Bob Monie
                      New Orleans, LA
                      Zone 8

                      --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:

                      From: Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
                      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 5:17 AM

                      Guenther,

                      I envy you all that rain.� During my ill-spent youth in London, I had a friend
                      who lived in a hole in the ground for a few years, I think it was in a large
                      forest in Cornwell or somewhere around there.� He mainly lived on wild roots
                      and berries and would come into town only once in a while.

                      I never tried quinoa and amaranth except for a few plants in the garden.� What
                      is amazing with quinoa is that it starts germinating a couple of hours after it
                      gets wet.� But the seeds are so small that they may not do well in existing
                      vegetation.� Hope you keep us informed.

                      Buckwheat is fairly easy though, takes a bit longer to germinate, but grows
                      extremely fast, about 3 months to harvest; which is because of the short
                      summers
                      in Russia where it is a staple.� But you need to be careful about cold.� It
                      is
                      killed off as soon the temps approach 0 deg. C.� But weed-suppressing
                      properties are not very good.� I think I must have used cut grass and weeds
                      from 2 to 3 acres just to mulch one acre. �But the buckwheat was still
                      completely grown-in by weeds.� But that my also be because native annuals here
                      grow extremely fast when it gets wet, a bit like the desert starting to bloom
                      after a rain.� Mind you it is not a desert, far from it.� All in all it�s
                      not useful here, too dry in the summer, to cold in the winter.� In fall and
                      spring other plants do better.

                      Did you try dinkel?� I�m just reading Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century
                      nun.� She thinks that dinkel is about the healthiest thing we can eat.� I
                      didn�t check it, but I suppose it would be a cold season-annual grain around
                      here.� Right now I�m stuck with a job, but if I can manage I want to sow
                      some
                      dinkel this month before it gets too late to sow cold-season grains.

                      Cheers, Dieter

                      PS:� About your mice, perhaps the only thing left is a cat.� With all their
                      drawbacks, cats have been part of homestead environment for centuries, there is
                      no reason to suppose that, if you take them away, the mice population won�t
                      explode.� If you know the parents, you can usually tell if they hunt or not.�
                      As I said, females are a safer bet.� Don�t get a city pet, get one from a
                      farmer that�s used to roaming freely.



                      --- On Thu, 11/13/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:

                      From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
                      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 8:23 PM






                      -Hello Dieter
                      i very much appreciate your reply and advice.
                      My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild
                      winters, lots of rain. All in all, i'm not doing that bad. It's just
                      that exeptional mice population. Even there are plenty of birds of
                      prey, they don't seem to have much impact.
                      Next spring i plan to plant buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth by cutting
                      the existing grass down to ground level, and broadcasting seed
                      pellets, mulching with the cut grass.(there is no problem for
                      moisture here) Any opinion on that?

                      thanks and regards
                      guenther


                      -- In fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@.. .>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > Jean,
                      > �
                      > Cats can solve a problem or create one:
                      > - some hunt, some don't (it's in the genes);
                      > - generally females are good hunters�(tom cats have other urges);
                      > - some like mice, some like birds � (a tom cat we had even went
                      after voles);
                      > - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
                      > - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the
                      lizards etc.;
                      > - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the
                      garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
                      > - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I
                      feed them.
                      > �
                      > Guenther,
                      > �
                      > Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what
                      Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.� I don't
                      know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)
                      > �
                      > In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
                      > - seedballs don't work very well (not enough or too much rain);
                      > - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains
                      (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
                      > - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect
                      every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not
                      active (Nov. 15 � Mar.)
                      > - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect from
                      birds but not from ants;
                      > - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most
                      seeds will germinate before eaten;
                      > - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse sand
                      for small seeds);
                      > - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of
                      the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea), especially
                      when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
                      > - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop
                      in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult
                      without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not
                      shredded) may help in some cases;
                      > - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow
                      with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with
                      soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
                      > - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-
                      tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too
                      early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too late
                      (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within
                      less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first
                      rains);
                      > �
                      > There is no magic solution to pest problems:
                      > - develop integrated system by close observation;
                      > - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant
                      but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
                      > - don't overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
                      > - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make
                      nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before
                      sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can't get
                      through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails
                      are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails
                      will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my winter
                      vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish greens
                      2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
                      > - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large
                      trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) �
                      > - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better
                      stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.
                      > �
                      > Good luck,
                      > �
                      > Concisely yours,
                      > Dieter
                      > �
                      > PS: Shawn, cats don't touch toads, if you ever kissed one to awaken
                      a prince you know why.
                      > �
                      >
                      > --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...> wrote:
                      >
                      > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...>
                      > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
                      > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                      > Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                      > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
                      containing
                      > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                      > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                      > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                      > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                      > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
                      and
                      > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                      > it seems like a no win situation.
                      > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                      >
                      > regards guenther
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >


















                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                      ------------------------------------

                      Yahoo! Groups Links





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                      ------------------------------------

                      Yahoo! Groups Links








                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Nicholas Pierotti
                      Where can one obtain Kawaguchi-san s books? Are they available in English? Nicholas On Fri, 14 Nov 2008 09:57:19 -0800 (PST), Dieter Brand wrote ... more
                      Message 10 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Where can one obtain Kawaguchi-san's books?

                        Are they available in English?

                        Nicholas

                        On Fri, 14 Nov 2008 09:57:19 -0800 (PST), Dieter Brand wrote
                        > Bob,
                        >  
                        > I’m glad those pictures from the homeland of Natural Farming were of some use.  I have a few
                        more things in the works, but being stuck with a technical text, I won’t get it ready before the end of
                        the month.
                        >  
                        > I started on the second book by Kawaguchi, in fact it is not entirely written by him.  It is a series of
                        texts by different Natural Farmers, with Kawaguchi acting as editor or coordinator.  While the first
                        one has a lot of Shinto- and forces-in-nature stuff, this one is more practical.  It is in fact, as I only
                        discovered afterwards, about the same group of people portrayed in the collection of photographs. 
                        Last night I had a look at the 3rd article (that cool looking couple with their kids, the Satos, pp. 32-
                        37 in your book).  She wrote it.  She seems to be a lot into weed/vegetable companion growing.  She
                        said she grew carrots, of all things, in a field of mehishiba, my dictionary gives crab grass.  I still
                        can’t believe it, and I will cross check the botanical names.  I don’t know how different crab grass is
                        from European quack grass, but if I could grow carrots in that, I would really make it big time.  Apart
                        from weeds she also uses
                        > wheat for companion growing.  With staged planting, the vegetables can take advantage of the
                        decaying wheat roots when they mature after the wheat has been harvested.  There are diagrams and
                        instructions about when to cut.  When I get some time I will introduce some of it.
                        >  
                        > I only just started with Hildegard von Bingen.  I was a little skeptical at first, since it has become a
                        bit of a fashion.  But she does seem to have a deep understanding of the relation between individual
                        food stuffs and health.  Not bad for the Middle Ages.  I don’t have the time and bandwidth to follow-
                        up your links, but I do like to learn more about it and find out if science finally caught up ;-)
                        >  
                        > Dieter Brand
                        > Portugal
                        >
                        > --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Robert Monie <bobm20001@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > From: Robert Monie <bobm20001@...>
                        > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Dinkel and the mystic herbalist Hildegard
                        > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                        > Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 4:12 PM
                        >
                        > Hi Dieter,
                        >  
                        > Let me join others in thanking you for the website of those devotees who gather
                        > in Japan each weekend to do natural farming and are brave and honest enough to
                        > record all their activities. They are a good antidote to temptation to be a
                        > luftmensch and try to farm with your head above the clouds too high to
                        > see which crops are and are not growing on the ground below.  At his best,
                        > Fukuoka had his eyes on the ground, inside the ground even, and inside the
                        > plant.
                        >  
                        > Dinkel is probably Triticum spelta or spelt grain. Hildegard said "spelt
                        > is the best of grains. It produces a strong body and healthy blood in those who
                        > use it, and it makes the spirit of man light and cheerful. If someone is ill,
                        > boil some spelt, mix it with egg and this will heal him like a fine
                        > ointment." A scientific analysis of spelt (beginning at page 193 of Jules
                        > Janick's online work "Plant Breeding Review") can be read by
                        > google.comming to
                        > "A total of 254 ha of spelt were certified...."  The analysis
                        > features an excellent photo of spelt and spelt seeds alongside common wheat
                        > wheat and wheat seeds. A little on the antiquity of dinkel/spelt appears at
                        > http://www.spelt.com/greeks.html.  
                        >  
                        > By the way, have you read any good books lately on natural farming in Japan?
                        >  
                        > Bob Monie
                        > New Orleans, LA
                        > Zone 8
                        >
                        > --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > From: Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
                        > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                        > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                        > Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 5:17 AM
                        >
                        > Guenther,
                        >  
                        > I envy you all that rain.  During my ill-spent youth in London, I had a friend
                        > who lived in a hole in the ground for a few years, I think it was in a large
                        > forest in Cornwell or somewhere around there.  He mainly lived on wild roots
                        > and berries and would come into town only once in a while.
                        >  
                        > I never tried quinoa and amaranth except for a few plants in the garden.  What
                        > is amazing with quinoa is that it starts germinating a couple of hours after it
                        > gets wet.  But the seeds are so small that they may not do well in existing
                        > vegetation.  Hope you keep us informed.
                        >  
                        > Buckwheat is fairly easy though, takes a bit longer to germinate, but grows
                        > extremely fast, about 3 months to harvest; which is because of the short
                        > summers
                        > in Russia where it is a staple.  But you need to be careful about cold.  It
                        > is
                        > killed off as soon the temps approach 0 deg. C.  But weed-suppressing
                        > properties are not very good.  I think I must have used cut grass and weeds
                        > from 2 to 3 acres just to mulch one acre.  But the buckwheat was still
                        > completely grown-in by weeds.  But that my also be because native annuals here
                        > grow extremely fast when it gets wet, a bit like the desert starting to bloom
                        > after a rain.  Mind you it is not a desert, far from it.  All in all it’s
                        > not useful here, too dry in the summer, to cold in the winter.  In fall and
                        > spring other plants do better.
                        >  
                        > Did you try dinkel?  I’m just reading Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century
                        > nun.  She thinks that dinkel is about the healthiest thing we can eat.  I
                        > didn’t check it, but I suppose it would be a cold season-annual grain around
                        > here.  Right now I’m stuck with a job, but if I can manage I want to sow
                        > some
                        > dinkel this month before it gets too late to sow cold-season grains.
                        >  
                        > Cheers, Dieter
                        >  
                        > PS:  About your mice, perhaps the only thing left is a cat.  With all their
                        > drawbacks, cats have been part of homestead environment for centuries, there is
                        > no reason to suppose that, if you take them away, the mice population won’t
                        > explode.  If you know the parents, you can usually tell if they hunt or not. 
                        > As I said, females are a safer bet.  Don’t get a city pet, get one from a
                        > farmer that’s used to roaming freely.
                        >  
                        >  
                        >  
                        > --- On Thu, 11/13/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
                        > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                        > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                        > Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 8:23 PM
                        >
                        > -Hello Dieter
                        > i very much appreciate your reply and advice.
                        > My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild
                        > winters, lots of rain. All in all, i'm not doing that bad. It's just
                        > that exeptional mice population. Even there are plenty of birds of
                        > prey, they don't seem to have much impact.
                        > Next spring i plan to plant buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth by cutting
                        > the existing grass down to ground level, and broadcasting seed
                        > pellets, mulching with the cut grass.(there is no problem for
                        > moisture here) Any opinion on that?
                        >
                        > thanks and regards
                        > guenther
                        >
                        > -- In fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@.. .>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Jean,
                        > >  
                        > > Cats can solve a problem or create one:
                        > > - some hunt, some don't (it's in the genes);
                        > > - generally females are good hunters (tom cats have other urges);
                        > > - some like mice, some like birds … (a tom cat we had even went
                        > after voles);
                        > > - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
                        > > - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the
                        > lizards etc.;
                        > > - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the
                        > garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
                        > > - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I
                        > feed them.
                        > >  
                        > > Guenther,
                        > >  
                        > > Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what
                        > Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.  I don't
                        > know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)
                        > >  
                        > > In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
                        > > - seedballs don't work very well (not enough or too much rain);
                        > > - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains
                        > (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
                        > > - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect
                        > every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not
                        > active (Nov. 15 – Mar.)
                        > > - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect from
                        > birds but not from ants;
                        > > - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most
                        > seeds will germinate before eaten;
                        > > - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse sand
                        > for small seeds);
                        > > - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of
                        > the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea), especially
                        > when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
                        > > - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop
                        > in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult
                        > without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not
                        > shredded) may help in some cases;
                        > > - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow
                        > with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with
                        > soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
                        > > - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-
                        > tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too
                        > early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too late
                        > (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within
                        > less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first
                        > rains);
                        > >  
                        > > There is no magic solution to pest problems:
                        > > - develop integrated system by close observation;
                        > > - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant
                        > but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
                        > > - don't overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
                        > > - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make
                        > nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before
                        > sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can't get
                        > through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails
                        > are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails
                        > will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my winter
                        > vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish greens
                        > 2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
                        > > - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large
                        > trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) …
                        > > - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better
                        > stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.
                        > >  
                        > > Good luck,
                        > >  
                        > > Concisely yours,
                        > > Dieter
                        > >  
                        > > PS: Shawn, cats don't touch toads, if you ever kissed one to awaken
                        > a prince you know why.
                        > >  
                        > >
                        > > --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...>
                        > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
                        > > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                        > > Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                        > > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
                        > containing
                        > > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                        > > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                        > > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                        > > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                        > > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
                        > and
                        > > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                        > > it seems like a no win situation.
                        > > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                        > >
                        > > regards guenther
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • Robert Monie
                        Hi Everybody,   If you were wondering what Dieter was referring to when he mentioned the Sato family in your [Bob Monie s] book, pp 32-37, we should let you
                        Message 11 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hi Everybody,

                          If you were wondering what Dieter was referring to when he mentioned the Sato family in "your [Bob Monie's] book, pp 32-37," we should let you in on the mystery.� This is Yuki Arai's book in Japanese just released a few months ago, entitled "People Living in Natural Farming" (Shizen-nou ni ikiru hito tachi) and published by Shizensyoku Tsushinsya. The ISBN is 978-4-916110-40-4. This book is a photo collection of families throughout Japan who practice (mostly, I gather, Kawaguchi style) natural farming. It�has a written introduction and some organizing text. If you read Japanese well enough, you can order copies from http://www.fujisan.com (I had a Japanese translator friend order mine). �As to Kawaguchi's own two books, neither, alas, been translated into English. From what Dieter has been saying about the second book in particular, it seems that someone ought to take up the challenge.�


                          Bob Monie
                          New Orleans, La
                          Zone 8

                          --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:

                          From: Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
                          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Dinkel and the mystic herbalist Hildegard
                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 11:57 AM

                          Bob,

                          I�m glad those pictures from the homeland of Natural Farming were of some
                          use.� I have a few more things in the works, but being stuck with a technical
                          text, I won�t get it ready before the end of the month.

                          I started on the second book by Kawaguchi, in fact it is not entirely written
                          by him.� It is a series of texts by different Natural Farmers, with Kawaguchi
                          acting as editor or coordinator.� While the first one has a lot of Shinto- and
                          forces-in-nature stuff, this one is more practical.� It is in fact, as I only
                          discovered afterwards, about the same group of people portrayed in the
                          collection of photographs.� Last night I had a look at the 3rd article (that
                          cool looking couple with their kids, the Satos, pp. 32-37 in your book).� She
                          wrote it.� She seems to be a lot into weed/vegetable companion growing.� She
                          said she grew carrots, of all things, in a field of mehishiba, my dictionary
                          gives crab grass.� I still can�t believe it, and I will cross check the
                          botanical names.� I don�t know how different crab grass is from European
                          quack grass, but if I could grow carrots in that, I would really make it big
                          time.� Apart from weeds she also uses
                          wheat for companion growing.� With staged planting, the vegetables can take
                          advantage of the decaying wheat roots when they mature after the wheat has been
                          harvested.� There are diagrams and instructions about when to cut.� When I get
                          some time I will introduce some of it.

                          I only just started with Hildegard von Bingen.� I was a little skeptical at
                          first, since it has become a bit of a fashion.� But she does seem to have a
                          deep understanding of the relation between individual food stuffs and health.�
                          Not bad for the Middle Ages.� I don�t have the time and bandwidth to
                          follow-up your links, but I do like to learn more about it and find out if
                          science finally caught up ;-)

                          Dieter Brand
                          Portugal


                          --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Robert Monie <bobm20001@...> wrote:

                          From: Robert Monie <bobm20001@...>
                          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Dinkel and the mystic herbalist Hildegard
                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 4:12 PM

                          Hi Dieter,

                          Let me join others in thanking you for the website of those devotees who gather
                          in Japan each weekend to do natural farming and are brave and honest enough to
                          record all their activities. They are a good antidote to�temptation to be a
                          luftmensch�and try to farm with�your head above the clouds too high to
                          see�which crops are and are not growing�on the ground below. �At his best,
                          Fukuoka had his eyes on the ground, inside the ground even, and inside the
                          plant.

                          Dinkel is probably Triticum spelta or spelt grain. Hildegard said "spelt
                          is the best of grains. It produces a strong body and healthy blood in those who
                          use it, and it makes the spirit of man light and cheerful. If someone is ill,
                          boil some spelt, mix it with egg and this will heal him like a fine
                          ointment." A scientific analysis of spelt�(beginning at page 193�of
                          Jules
                          Janick's online work "Plant�Breeding Review") can be read�by
                          google.comming to
                          "A total of 254 ha of spelt were certified...."� The analysis
                          features an excellent photo�of spelt�and spelt seeds alongside�common wheat
                          wheat and�wheat seeds.�A little on the antiquity of dinkel/spelt appears at
                          http://www.spelt.com/greeks.html.

                          By the way, have you read any good books lately on natural farming in Japan?

                          Bob Monie
                          New Orleans, LA
                          Zone 8

                          --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:

                          From: Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
                          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 5:17 AM

                          Guenther,

                          I envy you all that rain.� During my ill-spent youth in London, I had a friend
                          who lived in a hole in the ground for a few years, I think it was in a large
                          forest in Cornwell or somewhere around there.� He mainly lived on wild roots
                          and berries and would come into town only once in a while.

                          I never tried quinoa and amaranth except for a few plants in the garden.� What
                          is amazing with quinoa is that it starts germinating a couple of hours after it
                          gets wet.� But the seeds are so small that they may not do well in existing
                          vegetation.� Hope you keep us informed.

                          Buckwheat is fairly easy though, takes a bit longer to germinate, but grows
                          extremely fast, about 3 months to harvest; which is because of the short
                          summers
                          in Russia where it is a staple.� But you need to be careful about cold.� It
                          is
                          killed off as soon the temps approach 0 deg. C.� But weed-suppressing
                          properties are not very good.� I think I must have used cut grass and weeds
                          from 2 to 3 acres just to mulch one acre. �But the buckwheat was still
                          completely grown-in by weeds.� But that my also be because native annuals here
                          grow extremely fast when it gets wet, a bit like the desert starting to bloom
                          after a rain.� Mind you it is not a desert, far from it.� All in all it�s
                          not useful here, too dry in the summer, to cold in the winter.� In fall and
                          spring other plants do better.

                          Did you try dinkel?� I�m just reading Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century
                          nun.� She thinks that dinkel is about the healthiest thing we can eat.� I
                          didn�t check it, but I suppose it would be a cold season-annual grain around
                          here.� Right now I�m stuck with a job, but if I can manage I want to sow
                          some
                          dinkel this month before it gets too late to sow cold-season grains.

                          Cheers, Dieter

                          PS:� About your mice, perhaps the only thing left is a cat.� With all their
                          drawbacks, cats have been part of homestead environment for centuries, there is
                          no reason to suppose that, if you take them away, the mice population won�t
                          explode.� If you know the parents, you can usually tell if they hunt or not.�
                          As I said, females are a safer bet.� Don�t get a city pet, get one from a
                          farmer that�s used to roaming freely.



                          --- On Thu, 11/13/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:

                          From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
                          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 8:23 PM






                          -Hello Dieter
                          i very much appreciate your reply and advice.
                          My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild
                          winters, lots of rain. All in all, i'm not doing that bad. It's just
                          that exeptional mice population. Even there are plenty of birds of
                          prey, they don't seem to have much impact.
                          Next spring i plan to plant buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth by cutting
                          the existing grass down to ground level, and broadcasting seed
                          pellets, mulching with the cut grass.(there is no problem for
                          moisture here) Any opinion on that?

                          thanks and regards
                          guenther


                          -- In fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@.. .>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > Jean,
                          > �
                          > Cats can solve a problem or create one:
                          > - some hunt, some don't (it's in the genes);
                          > - generally females are good hunters�(tom cats have other urges);
                          > - some like mice, some like birds � (a tom cat we had even went
                          after voles);
                          > - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
                          > - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the
                          lizards etc.;
                          > - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the
                          garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
                          > - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I
                          feed them.
                          > �
                          > Guenther,
                          > �
                          > Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what
                          Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.� I don't
                          know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)
                          > �
                          > In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
                          > - seedballs don't work very well (not enough or too much rain);
                          > - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains
                          (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
                          > - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect
                          every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not
                          active (Nov. 15 � Mar.)
                          > - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect from
                          birds but not from ants;
                          > - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most
                          seeds will germinate before eaten;
                          > - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse sand
                          for small seeds);
                          > - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of
                          the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea), especially
                          when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
                          > - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop
                          in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult
                          without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not
                          shredded) may help in some cases;
                          > - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow
                          with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with
                          soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
                          > - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-
                          tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too
                          early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too late
                          (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within
                          less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first
                          rains);
                          > �
                          > There is no magic solution to pest problems:
                          > - develop integrated system by close observation;
                          > - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant
                          but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
                          > - don't overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
                          > - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make
                          nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before
                          sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can't get
                          through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails
                          are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails
                          will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my winter
                          vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish greens
                          2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
                          > - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large
                          trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) �
                          > - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better
                          stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.
                          > �
                          > Good luck,
                          > �
                          > Concisely yours,
                          > Dieter
                          > �
                          > PS: Shawn, cats don't touch toads, if you ever kissed one to awaken
                          a prince you know why.
                          > �
                          >
                          > --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...> wrote:
                          >
                          > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...>
                          > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
                          > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                          > Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                          > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
                          containing
                          > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                          > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                          > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                          > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                          > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
                          and
                          > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                          > it seems like a no win situation.
                          > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                          >
                          > regards guenther
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >


















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                        • Robert Monie
                          Mehishiba is indeed Digitaria sanguinalis or large crabgrass, according to a glossary of Japanese weeds that San Francisco translator Donald L. Philippi did
                          Message 12 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Mehishiba is indeed Digitaria sanguinalis or large crabgrass, according to a "glossary of
                            Japanese weeds" that San Francisco translator Donald L. Philippi did a few years ago for� translating "Japanese herbicide patents."� Some other translations he gives include the following:

                            akaza for Chenopodium album or lambsquarters
                            shiroza a synonym

                            hokobe for Stellaria media or chickweed
                            kohakobe also a synonym

                            heraobako for Plantago lanceolata or buckhorn plantain

                            hosoaogeito for Amaranthus hybridus or smooth pigweed

                            itadori for Polygonum cuspidatum or Japanese knotweed

                            nagabagishisishi for Rumex crispus or curly dock

                            noborogiku for Senecio vulgaris or common groundsel

                            sobakazura for Polygonium convulvulus or wild buckwheat

                            sugina for Equistem arvense or field horsetail

                            suiba for Rumex acetosa or sorrel

                            yomogi for Artemisia princeps or wormwood

                            Weeds are nature's success stories; they can grab hold of soil and nutrients under some of the worst circumstances; they can conserve resources and�persist�after many other plants�are dead.�And perhaps even in death, as their roots decay, they can lend life to succeeding plants. �No doubt their energies (e.g. litter and root nutrients, exudates, textured soil, microbial colonies) are on tap for other�nearby plants to use if crafty farmers can only discern how. The Satos evidently have found a way to have carrots plug into the mehishiba life cycle energies. We should all take note. ��

                            Bob Monie
                            in a field of stinging nettle
                            New Orleans, LA
                            Zone 8
                            --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:

                            From: Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
                            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Dinkel and the mystic herbalist Hildegard
                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 11:57 AM

                            Bob,

                            I�m glad those pictures from the homeland of Natural Farming were of some
                            use.� I have a few more things in the works, but being stuck with a technical
                            text, I won�t get it ready before the end of the month.

                            I started on the second book by Kawaguchi, in fact it is not entirely written
                            by him.� It is a series of texts by different Natural Farmers, with Kawaguchi
                            acting as editor or coordinator.� While the first one has a lot of Shinto- and
                            forces-in-nature stuff, this one is more practical.� It is in fact, as I only
                            discovered afterwards, about the same group of people portrayed in the
                            collection of photographs.� Last night I had a look at the 3rd article (that
                            cool looking couple with their kids, the Satos, pp. 32-37 in your book).� She
                            wrote it.� She seems to be a lot into weed/vegetable companion growing.� She
                            said she grew carrots, of all things, in a field of mehishiba, my dictionary
                            gives crab grass.� I still can�t believe it, and I will cross check the
                            botanical names.� I don�t know how different crab grass is from European
                            quack grass, but if I could grow carrots in that, I would really make it big
                            time.� Apart from weeds she also uses
                            wheat for companion growing.� With staged planting, the vegetables can take
                            advantage of the decaying wheat roots when they mature after the wheat has been
                            harvested.� There are diagrams and instructions about when to cut.� When I get
                            some time I will introduce some of it.

                            I only just started with Hildegard von Bingen.� I was a little skeptical at
                            first, since it has become a bit of a fashion.� But she does seem to have a
                            deep understanding of the relation between individual food stuffs and health.�
                            Not bad for the Middle Ages.� I don�t have the time and bandwidth to
                            follow-up your links, but I do like to learn more about it and find out if
                            science finally caught up ;-)

                            Dieter Brand
                            Portugal


                            --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Robert Monie <bobm20001@...> wrote:

                            From: Robert Monie <bobm20001@...>
                            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Dinkel and the mystic herbalist Hildegard
                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 4:12 PM

                            Hi Dieter,

                            Let me join others in thanking you for the website of those devotees who gather
                            in Japan each weekend to do natural farming and are brave and honest enough to
                            record all their activities. They are a good antidote to�temptation to be a
                            luftmensch�and try to farm with�your head above the clouds too high to
                            see�which crops are and are not growing�on the ground below. �At his best,
                            Fukuoka had his eyes on the ground, inside the ground even, and inside the
                            plant.

                            Dinkel is probably Triticum spelta or spelt grain. Hildegard said "spelt
                            is the best of grains. It produces a strong body and healthy blood in those who
                            use it, and it makes the spirit of man light and cheerful. If someone is ill,
                            boil some spelt, mix it with egg and this will heal him like a fine
                            ointment." A scientific analysis of spelt�(beginning at page 193�of
                            Jules
                            Janick's online work "Plant�Breeding Review") can be read�by
                            google.comming to
                            "A total of 254 ha of spelt were certified...."� The analysis
                            features an excellent photo�of spelt�and spelt seeds alongside�common wheat
                            wheat and�wheat seeds.�A little on the antiquity of dinkel/spelt appears at
                            http://www.spelt.com/greeks.html.

                            By the way, have you read any good books lately on natural farming in Japan?

                            Bob Monie
                            New Orleans, LA
                            Zone 8

                            --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:

                            From: Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
                            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 5:17 AM

                            Guenther,

                            I envy you all that rain.� During my ill-spent youth in London, I had a friend
                            who lived in a hole in the ground for a few years, I think it was in a large
                            forest in Cornwell or somewhere around there.� He mainly lived on wild roots
                            and berries and would come into town only once in a while.

                            I never tried quinoa and amaranth except for a few plants in the garden.� What
                            is amazing with quinoa is that it starts germinating a couple of hours after it
                            gets wet.� But the seeds are so small that they may not do well in existing
                            vegetation.� Hope you keep us informed.

                            Buckwheat is fairly easy though, takes a bit longer to germinate, but grows
                            extremely fast, about 3 months to harvest; which is because of the short
                            summers
                            in Russia where it is a staple.� But you need to be careful about cold.� It
                            is
                            killed off as soon the temps approach 0 deg. C.� But weed-suppressing
                            properties are not very good.� I think I must have used cut grass and weeds
                            from 2 to 3 acres just to mulch one acre. �But the buckwheat was still
                            completely grown-in by weeds.� But that my also be because native annuals here
                            grow extremely fast when it gets wet, a bit like the desert starting to bloom
                            after a rain.� Mind you it is not a desert, far from it.� All in all it�s
                            not useful here, too dry in the summer, to cold in the winter.� In fall and
                            spring other plants do better.

                            Did you try dinkel?� I�m just reading Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century
                            nun.� She thinks that dinkel is about the healthiest thing we can eat.� I
                            didn�t check it, but I suppose it would be a cold season-annual grain around
                            here.� Right now I�m stuck with a job, but if I can manage I want to sow
                            some
                            dinkel this month before it gets too late to sow cold-season grains.

                            Cheers, Dieter

                            PS:� About your mice, perhaps the only thing left is a cat.� With all their
                            drawbacks, cats have been part of homestead environment for centuries, there is
                            no reason to suppose that, if you take them away, the mice population won�t
                            explode.� If you know the parents, you can usually tell if they hunt or not.�
                            As I said, females are a safer bet.� Don�t get a city pet, get one from a
                            farmer that�s used to roaming freely.



                            --- On Thu, 11/13/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:

                            From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
                            Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 8:23 PM






                            -Hello Dieter
                            i very much appreciate your reply and advice.
                            My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild
                            winters, lots of rain. All in all, i'm not doing that bad. It's just
                            that exeptional mice population. Even there are plenty of birds of
                            prey, they don't seem to have much impact.
                            Next spring i plan to plant buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth by cutting
                            the existing grass down to ground level, and broadcasting seed
                            pellets, mulching with the cut grass.(there is no problem for
                            moisture here) Any opinion on that?

                            thanks and regards
                            guenther


                            -- In fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@.. .>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > Jean,
                            > �
                            > Cats can solve a problem or create one:
                            > - some hunt, some don't (it's in the genes);
                            > - generally females are good hunters�(tom cats have other urges);
                            > - some like mice, some like birds � (a tom cat we had even went
                            after voles);
                            > - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
                            > - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the
                            lizards etc.;
                            > - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the
                            garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
                            > - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I
                            feed them.
                            > �
                            > Guenther,
                            > �
                            > Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what
                            Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.� I don't
                            know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)
                            > �
                            > In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
                            > - seedballs don't work very well (not enough or too much rain);
                            > - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains
                            (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
                            > - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect
                            every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not
                            active (Nov. 15 � Mar.)
                            > - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect from
                            birds but not from ants;
                            > - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most
                            seeds will germinate before eaten;
                            > - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse sand
                            for small seeds);
                            > - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of
                            the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea), especially
                            when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
                            > - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop
                            in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult
                            without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not
                            shredded) may help in some cases;
                            > - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow
                            with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with
                            soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
                            > - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-
                            tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too
                            early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too late
                            (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within
                            less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first
                            rains);
                            > �
                            > There is no magic solution to pest problems:
                            > - develop integrated system by close observation;
                            > - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant
                            but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
                            > - don't overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
                            > - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make
                            nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before
                            sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can't get
                            through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails
                            are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails
                            will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my winter
                            vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish greens
                            2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
                            > - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large
                            trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) �
                            > - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better
                            stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.
                            > �
                            > Good luck,
                            > �
                            > Concisely yours,
                            > Dieter
                            > �
                            > PS: Shawn, cats don't touch toads, if you ever kissed one to awaken
                            a prince you know why.
                            > �
                            >
                            > --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...> wrote:
                            >
                            > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...>
                            > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
                            > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                            > Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                            > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
                            containing
                            > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                            > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                            > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                            > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                            > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
                            and
                            > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                            > it seems like a no win situation.
                            > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                            >
                            > regards guenther
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >


















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                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Dieter Brand
                            Guenther,   In my experience, of the small grains, only rye will grow in an existing stand of grass.  Wheat, barley, etc. may germinate, but can’t
                            Message 13 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Guenther,

                              In my experience, of the small grains, only rye will grow in an existing stand of grass.� Wheat, barley, etc. may germinate, but can�t compete.� A good combination is rye/vetch.� I used it a couple of years.� This will work as cover crop but may not produce any grains due to the competition from the grass.� Rye produces a very big root system that enriches the soil, the rye straw will produce biomass and is useful for weed-suppression.� The vetch will fix N and produce some biomass.� The vetch can grow taller due to the support from the rye stalks.� I sow in Nov. if we have rain.� If you can start a crop rotation this way you may _perhaps_ be able to start a _continuous non-stop_ crop rotation and get sufficient weed-suppression to start growing crops in a couple of years.� I don�t know if in your climate you can grow rye in the winter, then try to sow another crop in the summer even before cutting the rye. �Instead of grain rye you could
                              also use rye grass, but I think there may be a perennial variety.� I can�t continue the crop rotation during the dry season due to lack of rain.

                              You should be able to get spelt in you local health food store.� A bit expensive, but it won�t ruin you for a small scale trial.

                              Dieter Brand
                              Portugal

                              PS: Yes, maybo oats would do, Linda said something like that recently.

                              --- On Fri, 11/14/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...> wrote:

                              From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@...>
                              Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Friday, November 14, 2008, 4:21 PM






                              --- In fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@.. .>
                              wrote:
                              >Hi Dieter
                              You reminded me, that quinoa and amaranth are supposed to be started
                              in a seedbed or even in cells. that would be a lot of work.
                              The buckwheat, i might start between the braodbeans and peas, before
                              harvest in may. (if i get them going in numbers)
                              For my grass meadow (grass, dandelion, sorrel,plantain etc.) i still
                              don't know, what kind of grain would be easiest to establish without
                              tilling. maybe i should get lots of white clover in first?
                              Dinkel is Spelt in english? i havent managed to get any seeds yet.
                              Also an old yariety of oats could be nice. (?)
                              best regards

                              PS: how about swopping some sunshine for some rain?

                              > Guenther,
                              > �
                              > I envy you all that rain.� During my ill-spent youth in London, I
                              had a friend who lived in a hole in the ground for a few years, I
                              think it was in a large forest in Cornwell or somewhere around
                              there.� He mainly lived on wild roots and berries and would come into
                              town only once in a while.
                              > �
                              > I never tried quinoa and amaranth except for a few plants in the
                              garden.� What is amazing with quinoa is that it starts germinating a
                              couple of hours after it gets wet.� But the seeds are so small that
                              they may not do well in existing vegetation.� Hope you keep us
                              informed.
                              > �
                              > Buckwheat is fairly easy though, takes a bit longer to germinate,
                              but grows extremely fast, about 3 months to harvest; which is because
                              of the short summers in Russia where it is a staple.� But you need to
                              be careful about cold.� It is killed off as soon the temps approach 0
                              deg. C.� But weed-suppressing properties are not very good.� I think
                              I must have used cut grass and weeds from 2 to 3 acres just to mulch
                              one acre. �But the buckwheat was still completely grown-in by weeds.�
                              But that my also be because native annuals here grow extremely fast
                              when it gets wet, a bit like the desert starting to bloom after a
                              rain.� Mind you it is not a desert, far from it.� All in all it's not
                              useful here, too dry in the summer, to cold in the winter.� In fall
                              and spring other plants do better.
                              > �
                              > Did you try dinkel?� I'm just reading Hildegard von Bingen, the
                              12th century nun.� She thinks that dinkel is about the healthiest
                              thing we can eat.� I didn't check it, but I suppose it would be a
                              cold season-annual grain around here.� Right now I'm stuck with a
                              job, but if I can manage I want to sow some dinkel this month before
                              it gets too late to sow cold-season grains.
                              > �
                              > Cheers, Dieter
                              > �
                              > PS:� About your mice, perhaps the only thing left is a cat.� With
                              all their drawbacks, cats have been part of homestead environment for
                              centuries, there is no reason to suppose that, if you take them away,
                              the mice population won't explode.� If you know the parents, you can
                              usually tell if they hunt or not.� As I said, females are a safer
                              bet.� Don't get a city pet, get one from a farmer that's used to
                              roaming freely.
                              > �
                              > �
                              > �
                              > --- On Thu, 11/13/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...> wrote:
                              >
                              > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...>
                              > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seedballs and mice
                              > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                              > Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 8:23 PM
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > -Hello Dieter
                              > i very much appreciate your reply and advice.
                              > My piece of land is in Corwall/ South-West England. Very mild
                              > winters, lots of rain. All in all, i'm not doing that bad. It's
                              just
                              > that exeptional mice population. Even there are plenty of birds of
                              > prey, they don't seem to have much impact.
                              > Next spring i plan to plant buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth by
                              cutting
                              > the existing grass down to ground level, and broadcasting seed
                              > pellets, mulching with the cut grass.(there is no problem for
                              > moisture here) Any opinion on that?
                              >
                              > thanks and regards
                              > guenther
                              >
                              >
                              > -- In fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com, Dieter Brand <diebrand@ .>
                              > wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Jean,
                              > > �
                              > > Cats can solve a problem or create one:
                              > > - some hunt, some don't (it's in the genes);
                              > > - generally females are good hunters�(tom cats have other urges);
                              > > - some like mice, some like birds � (a tom cat we had even went
                              > after voles);
                              > > - we are stuck with 5 (semi-wild now in the 3rd generation);
                              > > - the dog keeps them from the house, or they would eat all the
                              > lizards etc.;
                              > > - I sometimes use a water hose to keep them from settling in the
                              > garden (cat litter is not suitable for food crops);
                              > > - I built a cat shelter about half a mile from the house where I
                              > feed them.
                              > > �
                              > > Guenther,
                              > > �
                              > > Basically you have to do what works in your place and not what
                              > Fukuoka (a farmer, not a Zen master) or anyone tells you.� I don't
                              > know where you are based (soil, climate, etc.)
                              > > �
                              > > In my case (semi-arid, heavy clay, very depleted soil):
                              > > - seedballs don't work very well (not enough or too much rain);
                              > > - whenever possible, I use direct broadcasting for small grains
                              > (wheat, rye, barely, etc.) and cover crops (vetch, lupines, etc.);
                              > > - rodents, birds and worms will take some, but ants will collect
                              > every grain of seed, hence, direct broadcasting only when ants not
                              > active (Nov. 15 � Mar.)
                              > > - covering seeds with mulch will help germination and protect
                              from
                              > birds but not from ants;
                              > > - check weather forecast: with 3 consecutive days of rain most
                              > seeds will germinate before eaten;
                              > > - when less than 3 days, pre-germinate in water (or wet coarse
                              sand
                              > for small seeds);
                              > > - black birds will pull edible legumes (beans, peas etc.) out of
                              > the ground when they germinate (every single bean or pea),
                              especially
                              > when the soil is dry: plant deeper + irrigate if possible,
                              > > - broad beans: (in wet garden soil) punch 2-3 inch deep hole, pop
                              > in bean, close with foot, irrigate well; (in dry soil) difficult
                              > without tilling, cover of deep straw mulch or of branches (not
                              > shredded) may help in some cases;
                              > > - drilling for garden vegetables: rake aside mulch, make furrow
                              > with pointed hoe, put in seeds (pre-germ. if necessary), cover with
                              > soil, leaf compost etc., push mulch towards furrow a little;
                              > > - with transplants: hardening of plants before planting + fine-
                              > tuning of timing, e.g., planting winter vegetables in Aug. is too
                              > early (not enough water for irrigation), planting in Oct. is too
                              late
                              > (young plants (cabbages, salads, etc.) will be finished off within
                              > less than a week by slugs and snails that come out with the first
                              > rains);
                              > > �
                              > > There is no magic solution to pest problems:
                              > > - develop integrated system by close observation;
                              > > - pests are often periodic (extreme in extreme climate, constant
                              > but easier to deal with in temperate climates);
                              > > - don't overreact (may go away), but keep a close watch;
                              > > - slugs and snails: create habitat for toads and frogs etc., make
                              > nightly round with torchlight (new LED lamps: very econ.) before
                              > sleep: slugs live in holes (e.g. ant hills, the ants can't get
                              > through the slime and slugs use the food store of the ants); snails
                              > are under large stones, etc.; reduce food supply: e.g. tiny snails
                              > will feed und multiply on my horseradish in Aug. and attack my
                              winter
                              > vegetables in large numbers in Sep., if I cut the horseradish
                              greens
                              > 2 weeks before planting, most will have gone away
                              > > - rodents: cats (see above), night owls (build shelter in large
                              > trees or barn, design on the net, sitting poles in the garden) �
                              > > - there are dozens more things you can do, but I guess I better
                              > stop, or I get bashed over the head for being too detailed.
                              > > �
                              > > Good luck,
                              > > �
                              > > Concisely yours,
                              > > Dieter
                              > > �
                              > > PS: Shawn, cats don't touch toads, if you ever kissed one to
                              awaken
                              > a prince you know why.
                              > > �
                              > >
                              > > --- On Wed, 11/12/08, gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ ...>
                              > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice
                              > > To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                              > > Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 5:21 PM
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                              > > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
                              > containing
                              > > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                              > > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                              > > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                              > > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                              > > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
                              > and
                              > > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                              > > it seems like a no win situation.
                              > > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                              > >
                              > > regards guenther
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >


















                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Jean Villafuerte
                              Thank you, Shawn. That s probably why rats are not very abundant in our Ecology Farm. We see Philippine Eagle flying by. And we are strictly imposing a no
                              Message 14 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
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                                Thank you, Shawn.

                                That's probably why rats are not very abundant in our Ecology Farm. We see Philippine Eagle flying by. And we are strictly imposing a no hunting policy within our farm. We educate the kids and the neighbors around. What I am very, very afraid of are snakes! Although we just let them pass by, the neighborhood kids kill them and these snakes really give me the creeps. Is there a way of letting them out of our way?

                                jean
                                www.ammado.com/pfi
                                www.ormocwomen.blogspot.com
                                www.evyouth.blogspot.com
                                www.tcfoc.blogspot.com
                                www.pfi.blogspot.com
                                www.geocities.com/pfft_2000

                                visit my blogs and leave your comments.





                                ________________________________
                                From: Shawn Turner <shawndturner@...>
                                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 9:20:46 PM
                                Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice


                                You dont have a rat problem! You have a lack of Raptor habitat. You need to encourge, Owls, hawks, etc. They will do more good than the cats. Cats will kill everything including precious native song birds. Raptors are much better at kill rats, than cats. They will not destroy your native birds, frogs, lizards, toads. These animals are the ones that will fix your slug problem!

                                ____________ _________ _________ __
                                From: Jean Villafuerte <dayjean455@yahoo. com>
                                To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                                Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2008 8:41:51 PM
                                Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice

                                Try raising cats for your rats. I don't know a biological control for slugs.

                                jean
                                www.ammado.com/ pfi
                                www.ormocwomen. blogspot. com
                                www.evyouth. blogspot. com
                                www.tcfoc.blogspot. com
                                www.pfi.blogspot. com
                                www.geocities. com/pfft_ 2000

                                visit my blogs and leave your comments.

                                ____________ _________ _________ __
                                From: gunther1753 <gunther.jerabek@ btinternet. com>
                                To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                                Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 1:21:08 AM
                                Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Seedballs and mice

                                Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                                they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs containing
                                broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                                i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                                peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                                so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                                greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring, and
                                then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                                it seems like a no win situation.
                                how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.

                                regards guenther

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Ben Kobus
                                Dieter, Following up a reference in another of your postings: I have heard great things about Hildegard s wisdom in growing things and their health properties,
                                Message 15 of 24 , Nov 14, 2008
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                                  Dieter,

                                  Following up a reference in another of your postings: I have heard great things about Hildegard's wisdom in growing things and their health properties, and am very keen to read her. Please could you suggest some texts (including online if possible as I am in Africa and it can be complicated to get books sent out here) which give her authentic words (preferably, rather than commentaries about her).

                                  Thanks.

                                  Ben

                                  --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:
                                  > I’m just reading Hildegard von
                                  > Bingen, the 12th century nun.
                                • Dieter Brand
                                  Ben,   The text I m reading is in German, a friend sent it to us from Germany.  I would look around on the web for you, but my Internet access is so bad
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Nov 15, 2008
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Ben,

                                    The text I'm reading is in German, a friend sent it to us from Germany.� I would look around on the web for you, but my Internet access is so bad that, most of the time, the best I can do is sending text messages.� Perhaps Bob will help you out with this one.

                                    Good luck,
                                    Dieter

                                    --- On Sat, 11/15/08, Ben Kobus <angemalaika@...> wrote:

                                    From: Ben Kobus <angemalaika@...>
                                    Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Hildegard of Bingen
                                    To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Saturday, November 15, 2008, 7:14 AM






                                    Dieter,

                                    Following up a reference in another of your postings: I have heard great things about Hildegard's wisdom in growing things and their health properties, and am very keen to read her. Please could you suggest some texts (including online if possible as I am in Africa and it can be complicated to get books sent out here) which give her authentic words (preferably, rather than commentaries about her).

                                    Thanks.

                                    Ben

                                    --- On Fri, 11/14/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@yahoo. com> wrote:
                                    > I�m just reading Hildegard von
                                    > Bingen, the 12th century nun.

















                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Robert Monie
                                    Hi,   The Physica of Hildegard has been translated into English by Pricilla Throop and is widely available for purchase, new or used, from such mass book
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Nov 17, 2008
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                                      Hi,
                                       
                                      The "Physica" of Hildegard has been translated into English by Pricilla Throop and is widely available for purchase, new or used, from such mass book sellers as http://www.amazon.com and http://www.abebooks.com.  Usually this book sells for $20.00 or less. An excerpt from "Physica" is also available in English under the title "Hildegard's Healing Plants, from Her Medieval Classic 'Physica.'" Like most medieval writers, Hildegard needs to be taken with a grain of salt, since she freely dishes out melanges of fact and fiction, sober waking periods and dream stupors,  without much care to distinguish between the two. To get into the mood for Hildegard it would be fun to first read "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (one of the wildest Christmas stories ever told) or the "The Travels of John Mandeville" (in which tribes of  people who carry their heads at waist level are described and trips are made to China without quite knowing in which direction
                                      that country actually lies).
                                       
                                      Sincerely,
                                       
                                      Bob Monie
                                      New Orleans, LA
                                      Zone 8

                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Dieter Brand
                                      ... Sometimes facts are even more unbelievable than fiction.  The Portuguese Navegatores of the 15th and 16th century had a pretty vague idea about were
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Nov 17, 2008
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        > and trips are made to China without quite knowing
                                        > in which direction that country actually lies).

                                        Sometimes facts are even more unbelievable than fiction.  The Portuguese Navegatores of the 15th and 16th century had a pretty vague idea about were China actual was or if it was there where they wanted to go, but they still ended up at the coast near Macao and even went as far as Japan.  I still have an old loquat tree in my garden (Nespera in Portuguese and Biwa no Ki in Japanese), the seeds of these trees were originally brought back by the early Portuguese travelers from Japan.  An account that plunges you right into the mood of those days is the Perigrinations, or at least I think that is what it is called in English.
                                        Dieter Brand
                                        Portugal
                                         

                                        --- On Mon, 11/17/08, Robert Monie <bobm20001@...> wrote:

                                        From: Robert Monie <bobm20001@...>
                                        Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Hildegard of Bingen
                                        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                        Date: Monday, November 17, 2008, 2:44 PM






                                        Hi,
                                         
                                        The "Physica" of Hildegard has been translated into English by Pricilla Throop and is widely available for purchase, new or used, from such mass book sellers as http://www.amazon com and http://www.abebooks .com.  Usually this book sells for $20.00 or less. An excerpt from "Physica" is also available in English under the title "Hildegard's Healing Plants, from Her Medieval Classic 'Physica.'" Like most medieval writers, Hildegard needs to be taken with a grain of salt, since she freely dishes out melanges of fact and fiction, sober waking periods and dream stupors,  without much care to distinguish between the two. To get into the mood for Hildegard it would be fun to first read "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (one of the wildest Christmas stories ever told) or the "The Travels of John Mandeville" (in which tribes of  people who carry their heads at waist level are described and trips are made to China without quite knowing in which
                                        direction
                                        that country actually lies).
                                         
                                        Sincerely,
                                         
                                        Bob Monie
                                        New Orleans, LA
                                        Zone 8

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Ben Kobus
                                        Thanks for the leads on Hildegard, which are much apreciated. But is there really any need for patronising digs about the middle ages? I know these are de
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Nov 17, 2008
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                                          Thanks for the leads on Hildegard, which are much apreciated. But is there really any need for patronising digs about the middle ages? I know these are de rigeur in our "enlightened" times, but much of the wisdom we could benefit from in the middle ages tends to get too easily thrown out with the bathwater because of this questionable attitude.


                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • Dieter Brand
                                          Ben,   ...   I don t know whom you are replying to.  But I sometimes forget that humor doesn t travel easily across cultural frontiers.  Perhaps we should
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Nov 18, 2008
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                                            Ben,
                                             
                                            > ... patronising digs about the middle ages?
                                             
                                            I don't know whom you are replying to.  But I sometimes forget that humor doesn't travel easily across cultural frontiers.  Perhaps we should all confine ourselves to robot talk!?
                                             
                                            Dieter

                                            --- On Mon, 11/17/08, Ben Kobus <angemalaika@...> wrote:

                                            From: Ben Kobus <angemalaika@...>
                                            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Hildegard of Bingen
                                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                            Date: Monday, November 17, 2008, 6:38 PM






                                            Thanks for the leads on Hildegard, which are much apreciated. But is there really any need for patronising digs about the middle ages? I know these are de rigeur in our "enlightened" times, but much of the wisdom we could benefit from in the middle ages tends to get too easily thrown out with the bathwater because of this questionable attitude.

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          • Ben Kobus
                                            Sorry, no offence meant. What I should be doing is commending the interest in Hildegard, not nit-picking the interest which has been expressed. Am I a bit
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Nov 18, 2008
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              Sorry, no offence meant. What I should be doing is commending the interest in Hildegard, not nit-picking the interest which has been expressed.

                                              Am I a bit paranoid in jumping to the defence of the middle ages? Perhaps. Am I riled by the shortsighted and ignorant arrogance of "the oligarchy of the living" (not in this forum, which is if anything more sympathetic to the medieval in its radicalism than most)? Definitely, and I believe I have good cause to be: it is all too commonplace in the influential elite who govern what many of us are obliged to consume as "news".

                                              --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@...> wrote:
                                              From: Dieter Brand <diebrand@...>
                                              Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Hildegard of Bingen
                                              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                              Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 9:19 AM











                                              Ben,

                                               

                                              > ... patronising digs about the middle ages?

                                               

                                              I don't know whom you are replying to.  But I sometimes forget that humor doesn't travel easily across cultural frontiers.  Perhaps we should all confine ourselves to robot talk!?

                                               

                                              Dieter



                                              --- On Mon, 11/17/08, Ben Kobus <angemalaika@ yahoo.com> wrote:



                                              From: Ben Kobus <angemalaika@ yahoo.com>

                                              Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Hildegard of Bingen

                                              To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com

                                              Date: Monday, November 17, 2008, 6:38 PM



                                              Thanks for the leads on Hildegard, which are much apreciated. But is there really any need for patronising digs about the middle ages? I know these are de rigeur in our "enlightened" times, but much of the wisdom we could benefit from in the middle ages tends to get too easily thrown out with the bathwater because of this questionable attitude.



                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


























                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            • Steven McCollough
                                              Guenther, I used to have more trouble with slugs and mice until I started running chickens through the field. One method that has worked for me in Northern
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Nov 18, 2008
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                                                Guenther,

                                                I used to have more trouble with slugs and mice until I started running
                                                chickens through the field. One method that has worked for me in
                                                Northern North America is as follows.

                                                Mow the grasses very low and hard a few times in the driest part of
                                                summer to weaken it. Since the perennial grasses tend to clump, cutting
                                                severely exposes more mineral soil. I am tempted to get one of those
                                                mulching blades for the mower that will stir up the mineral soil.
                                                Scatter rye (pre-soaked) when the fall rains come dependably. The grass
                                                comes back faster than the rye sprouts and is cut once at just the right
                                                time to allow rye to dominate.
                                                If the rye doesn't overtake the grass or not completely then scatter
                                                rye again in the spring and try to cut again if the grass is above the
                                                fall rye (usually not).
                                                Rye does better than grass in the dry summer and gets started well
                                                sometimes.
                                                Two weeks before rye harvest scatter buckwheat (pre-soaked) into
                                                standing rye. It comes in well as a rule even if it is really dry, but
                                                better if it gets one or two rains.
                                                Plant rye back into the standing buckwheat in the fall.
                                                At that point I have tried unsuccessfully a transition to other
                                                rotations. My next experiment will be to plant oats into buckwheat in
                                                the fall to winter kill and provide a spring opportunity to plant into
                                                weedless mulch.
                                                Having done this a number of times I would estimate it worked about half
                                                the time. Failures tended to be if I timed the rain wrong or it didn't
                                                show up as expected and the rye didn't sprout.

                                                This is basically the method of perennial grass control suggested by
                                                Rodale in a book about weeds I discovered and can't immediately quote
                                                the title. It is based on the weed (grass) fighting abilities of these
                                                two crops. After rye, buckwheat, rye, the grasses can be knocked back
                                                by 80 percent or so. My biggest challenge then is the annuals that take
                                                advantage of the open space. This method has also allowed me to add to
                                                the white and red clover base I am trying to establish. Pre-soaking
                                                seeds make them harder to scatter. I use one of those hand crank
                                                seeders and have to reach in and clear the bottom or bounce up and down
                                                as the wet seeds clump and clog. I have also initiated this sequence by
                                                tilling originally and had even better success, naturally?

                                                One year I added broccoli to the summer buckwheat and it stayed small
                                                until harvesting the buckwheat at which time it gave me a fall crop
                                                instead of rye being replanted.

                                                Steve McCollough

                                                gunther1753 wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                                                > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs containing
                                                > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                                                > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                                                > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                                                > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                                                > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring, and
                                                > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                                                > it seems like a no win situation.
                                                > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                                                >
                                                > regards guenther
                                                >
                                                >
                                              • Dieter Brand
                                                Ben,   No offence taken.  I just didn t know whom or what you were referring to since I hadn t even mentioned the Middle Ages in my previous reply.   On
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Nov 18, 2008
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                                                  Ben,

                                                  No offence taken.� I just didn't know whom or what you were referring to since I hadn't even mentioned the Middle Ages in my previous reply.

                                                  On another list, I just had a long exchange about the supposedly dark Middle Ages versus the shining brightness of the age of reason and science, which I won't repeat here (sigh of relief).� Basically, what I think is that our concepts of history are subject to change and that looking at history from a different angle may well show that the dark ages weren't all that dark and that the age of reason has brought about more than one catastrophe that easily puts the whole of the dark ages into the shadow.

                                                  Some will wonder: what has any of this got to do with Fukuoka?� I think it is not entirely unrelated.� Fukuoka's blanket rejection of what he calls "Western Sciences" and the uncritical repetition of such ideas do pose a problem.� I think a truly holistic view of things needs to take the findings of analytical science into consideration.� I don�t believe that romanticism, spirituality for its own sake or fundamentalism will solve the problems facing future generations.

                                                  Dieter



                                                  --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ben Kobus <angemalaika@...> wrote:

                                                  From: Ben Kobus <angemalaika@...>
                                                  Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Hildegard of Bingen
                                                  To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 9:56 AM






                                                  Sorry, no offence meant. What I should be doing is commending the interest in Hildegard, not nit-picking the interest which has been expressed.

                                                  Am I a bit paranoid in jumping to the defence of the middle ages? Perhaps. Am I riled by the shortsighted and ignorant arrogance of "the oligarchy of the living" (not in this forum, which is if anything more sympathetic to the medieval in its radicalism than most)? Definitely, and I believe I have good cause to be: it is all too commonplace in the influential elite who govern what many of us are obliged to consume as "news".

                                                  --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Dieter Brand <diebrand@yahoo. com> wrote:
                                                  From: Dieter Brand <diebrand@yahoo. com>
                                                  Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Hildegard of Bingen
                                                  To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 9:19 AM

                                                  Ben,



                                                  > ... patronising digs about the middle ages?



                                                  I don't know whom you are replying to.� But I sometimes forget that humor doesn't travel easily across cultural frontiers.� Perhaps we should all confine ourselves to robot talk!?



                                                  Dieter

                                                  --- On Mon, 11/17/08, Ben Kobus <angemalaika@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                                                  From: Ben Kobus <angemalaika@ yahoo.com>

                                                  Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Hildegard of Bingen

                                                  To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com

                                                  Date: Monday, November 17, 2008, 6:38 PM

                                                  Thanks for the leads on Hildegard, which are much apreciated. But is there really any need for patronising digs about the middle ages? I know these are de rigeur in our "enlightened" times, but much of the wisdom we could benefit from in the middle ages tends to get too easily thrown out with the bathwater because of this questionable attitude.

                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • gunther1753
                                                  -Hi Steve Many thanks for your reply. May i yust add a quick question: Could i really buy Spelt, Rye, Oats Seeds in a Organic shop, that sells seeds for eating
                                                  Message 24 of 24 , Nov 18, 2008
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    -Hi Steve
                                                    Many thanks for your reply.
                                                    May i yust add a quick question:
                                                    Could i really buy Spelt, Rye, Oats Seeds in a Organic shop, that
                                                    sells seeds for eating (cooking), rather than
                                                    planting?
                                                    Many thanks, cheerio
                                                    guenther
                                                    -- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Steven McCollough <steb@...>
                                                    wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > Guenther,
                                                    >
                                                    > I used to have more trouble with slugs and mice until I started
                                                    running
                                                    > chickens through the field. One method that has worked for me in
                                                    > Northern North America is as follows.
                                                    >
                                                    > Mow the grasses very low and hard a few times in the driest part of
                                                    > summer to weaken it. Since the perennial grasses tend to clump,
                                                    cutting
                                                    > severely exposes more mineral soil. I am tempted to get one of
                                                    those
                                                    > mulching blades for the mower that will stir up the mineral soil.
                                                    > Scatter rye (pre-soaked) when the fall rains come dependably. The
                                                    grass
                                                    > comes back faster than the rye sprouts and is cut once at just the
                                                    right
                                                    > time to allow rye to dominate.
                                                    > If the rye doesn't overtake the grass or not completely then
                                                    scatter
                                                    > rye again in the spring and try to cut again if the grass is above
                                                    the
                                                    > fall rye (usually not).
                                                    > Rye does better than grass in the dry summer and gets started well
                                                    > sometimes.
                                                    > Two weeks before rye harvest scatter buckwheat (pre-soaked) into
                                                    > standing rye. It comes in well as a rule even if it is really dry,
                                                    but
                                                    > better if it gets one or two rains.
                                                    > Plant rye back into the standing buckwheat in the fall.
                                                    > At that point I have tried unsuccessfully a transition to other
                                                    > rotations. My next experiment will be to plant oats into buckwheat
                                                    in
                                                    > the fall to winter kill and provide a spring opportunity to plant
                                                    into
                                                    > weedless mulch.
                                                    > Having done this a number of times I would estimate it worked about
                                                    half
                                                    > the time. Failures tended to be if I timed the rain wrong or it
                                                    didn't
                                                    > show up as expected and the rye didn't sprout.
                                                    >
                                                    > This is basically the method of perennial grass control suggested
                                                    by
                                                    > Rodale in a book about weeds I discovered and can't immediately
                                                    quote
                                                    > the title. It is based on the weed (grass) fighting abilities of
                                                    these
                                                    > two crops. After rye, buckwheat, rye, the grasses can be knocked
                                                    back
                                                    > by 80 percent or so. My biggest challenge then is the annuals that
                                                    take
                                                    > advantage of the open space. This method has also allowed me to
                                                    add to
                                                    > the white and red clover base I am trying to establish. Pre-
                                                    soaking
                                                    > seeds make them harder to scatter. I use one of those hand crank
                                                    > seeders and have to reach in and clear the bottom or bounce up and
                                                    down
                                                    > as the wet seeds clump and clog. I have also initiated this
                                                    sequence by
                                                    > tilling originally and had even better success, naturally?
                                                    >
                                                    > One year I added broccoli to the summer buckwheat and it stayed
                                                    small
                                                    > until harvesting the buckwheat at which time it gave me a fall crop
                                                    > instead of rye being replanted.
                                                    >
                                                    > Steve McCollough
                                                    >
                                                    > gunther1753 wrote:
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Unfortunately i have lots of mice in my garden.
                                                    > > they had no problem finding and carrying away the seedballs
                                                    containing
                                                    > > broadbeans, fieldbeans and peas.
                                                    > > i even added chillypowder, and tried also wrapping the seeds in
                                                    > > peppermint leaves. all to no avail.
                                                    > > so i'm back to square one, having to grow everything on in the
                                                    > > greenhouse, then planting out reasonable sized plants in spring,
                                                    and
                                                    > > then be faced with a mayor slug-attack.
                                                    > > it seems like a no win situation.
                                                    > > how i wish to be a zen-master like Fukuoko-san.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > regards guenther
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    >
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