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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Against Animals

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  • Shawn Turner
    I had problems with squirrels once. I ate them!! Just kidding. I sprayed hot pepper Spray on them. Then I took them over to where to squirrels where coming
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 15, 2008
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      I had problems with squirrels once. I ate them!! Just kidding. I sprayed hot pepper Spray on them. Then I took them over to where to squirrels where coming into eat them. I watched as the squirrels came down to grab the tomato and take a bit. They immediately drop the tomato and ran off. The next day I did the same thing for 3 days. I have never had a problem sense and we have tons of squirrels.

      I have also heard if you plant hot peppers next to your tomato's animals will leave them alone.


      ----- Original Message ----
      From: "yarrow@..." <yarrow@...>
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2008 3:45:49 PM
      Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] Against Animals


      Every year seems to be a little bit different, and in my garden most
      predation occurs in early spring and fall, when foods are less
      abundant in the wild.

      I had read about planting sunflowers to keep the squirrels away from
      the tomatoes, so several years ago I tried it and it didn't work --
      they stayed away from the sunflowers and ate tomatoes. But I noticed
      they ate mostly the very fragrant larger open-pollinated tomatoes,
      especially the pink and purple/black ones, so I started growing more
      cherry tomatoes, as well as different colors (orange, yellow).

      But this year, the squirrels have been eating every flower from one
      sunflower plant that volunteered. They left the tomatoes alone until
      yesterday, when I found my last large orange/yellow tomato partly
      eaten!

      Tanya in California

      At 9:30 AM +0530 10/14/08, <shashi.pkumar@ wipro.com> wrote:
      Yuho San,

      One more option you could explore is to grow a trap crop - a crop
      wallabies and possums like most. While wallabies and possums
      concentrate on the trap crop, you vegetables will be spared...

      I saved most of my paddy (grown in 20 cents area) from bird attacks
      by growing sunflowers in a small areas (around 2 cents area...).
      Still there were bird attacks to paddy but I believe was able to
      divert their attention...

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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