Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: zero tillage

Expand Messages
  • michael
    Friends, the degree to which you adhere to (organic) zero tillage depends on how long you ve got. If time is no problem, and if alien pasture grasses are your
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 8, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Friends,

      the degree to which you adhere to (organic) zero tillage depends on
      how long you've got. If time is no problem, and if alien pasture
      grasses are your problem, cutting the grasses (to 15cm) and
      broadcasting your seed will eventually work. If you want it to take
      less than a decade, you can burn the brown grasses in the early
      Spring and drill your seed, cutting the grasses to 15cm then until
      your seedlings get established. You get the carbon of the burning
      and the inhibition of the mowing.

      Golden rod can only be gotten rid of by mowing. It inhibits the
      germination of other plants.

      Amaranth is very common naturally (here) in burned and mowed fields.
      If you want the cultivated variety of amaranth, drill seeds of that.
      It's offspring will hybridize with the wild in the seed bank but the
      heads will generally be on the large size of the cultivated, at least
      for years. We get amaranth popping in all kinds of places even
      though we seeded only once. We eat the leaves green and steamed.
      The grain goes into bread with a large tithe for the birds in Winter.

      - Michael

      On Jul 5, 2008, at 8:40 AM, lucia@... wrote:

      > this is an interesting thread. my husband would like to grow some
      > amaranth
      > in an old haying field that has been uncut for over 40 years. We would
      > like to do it without tilling the ground. by the end of the summer
      > it is
      > mostly goldden rod. I am wondering if anyone here has experience with
      > amaranth. it sounds lik we could simply keep an area mowed and sow
      > seeds
      > into the grass. we've read however that amaranth is not very
      > competitive
      > when it's small.
      >
      > -lucia
      >
      > On Thu, 3 Jul 2008, Jamie Nicol wrote:
      >
      > > Dear All, as Raju Titus says, seeds in nature generally germinate
      > on the
      > > surface - I´m watching the winter wheat right now as the root
      > sinks into the
      > > soil and the first leaf travels up toward the light.
      > >
      > > I´ve tried seeding directly into pasture, cutting the pasture to
      > the ground
      > > first, with little success, even wrapping the seeds in clay. So,
      > I have
      > > thought it necessary to disturb the soil in some way first to
      > weaken the
      > > vegetation to allow the weaker (because more developed for
      > particular
      > > characteristics) vegetable seeds to get a head start. But all the
      > cycles of
      > > life in the soil that are destroyed, the untold billions of
      > micro- and
      > > macro-organisms that die as a result seems too heavy a price to pay.
      > >
      > > So I´d like to suggest that if you have some grassland you wish
      > to turn over
      > > to vegetables then the best way is to ensure that no seeds of the
      > current
      > > years plants are allowed to set seed and instead, at the best
      > moment for
      > > each plant you wish to seed, you cut back the grasses and wild
      > herbs and
      > > seed large amounts of what you wish to grow (seedballing would
      > reduce the
      > > amount of seeds you might need but takes extra time to do).
      > Therefore with
      > > the no new seeds of the wild plants on the surface, and the
      > vegetation cut
      > > back to the ground, the seeds you cast will have a chance to
      > grow. Depending
      > > on the size and type of seed you´re using you might be able to
      > spread the
      > > cut vegetation over your seeds, this helps protect them from
      > birds and helps
      > > retain moisture, accelerating their germination.
      > >
      > > These are just some thoughts from my own observations, I offer
      > them as
      > > suggestions and not as definitive answers, indeed Natural Farming
      > will never
      > > be the same in every place and Fukuoka´s work is an inspiration
      > and not a
      > > template, I think we sometimes forget that.
      > >
      > > Good Luck
      > >
      > > Jamie
      > > Mas Franch
      > >
      > > On Thu, Jul 3, 2008 at 7:29 AM, Raju Titus <rajuktitus@...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > > Dear friends,
      > > > To understand natural way of farming one should see how seeds
      > > > germinate in nature. Most of the natural seeds germinate on the
      > top of
      > > > the soil .The ecology of untiled ,covered soil is different.But
      > it is
      > > > true that naked seeds are generally eaten by
      > rats,birds,insects. Seed
      > > > balls,mulch,sowing in line,dibbling are few do nothing methods
      > which
      > > > helps in sowing.
      > > > Green cover of grass is helpful we scattered directly seeds in the
      > > > cover of grass and after germination we cut back and mulch
      > loosely it
      > > > in the same place.
      > > > Raju
      > > >
      > > > On Thu, Jul 3, 2008 at 1:28 AM, mypovertymountain
      > > > <fullcircleherbs@... <fullcircleherbs%40gmail.com>> wrote:
      > > > > If you don't ever till then how do you initially break up the
      > soil to
      > > > > get th eseeds in? Do you mulch for a time to break down the
      > grass?
      > > > >
      > > > > Thanks,
      > > > > Cyn
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com<fukuoka_farming%
      > 40yahoogroups.com>,
      > > > "Raju Titus" <rajuktitus@...>
      > > > > wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > >>
      > > > >> Dear friend,
      > > > >> Digging,tilling,plowing is unnecessary and very harmful to
      > the ecology
      > > > >> of land. If land is covered by green or dry mulch it is
      > become porous
      > > > >> by the activity of so many insects,animals. Tilled fine soil
      > chokes
      > > > >> porosity of the land is do not allow rain water to go in
      > side it
      > > > >> flows and washes top soil (fertility).
      > > > >> Raju
      > > > >>
      > > > >> On Tue, Jul 1, 2008 at 9:31 PM, JSENT <wegrow4@...> wrote:
      > > > >> > "Basic thing in natural farming is zero tillage."
      > > > >> >
      > > > >> > Greetings, Raju,
      > > > >> > Would you consider loosely digging/ turning soil with a
      > shovel or
      > > > > spading
      > > > >> > fork to be tilling? Thanks for your response.
      > > > >> >
      > > > >> > kind regards,
      > > > >> >
      > > > >> > jake
      > > > >> > www.grandprairiefood.com
      > > > >> >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.