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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: deep mulching question RE: PAPER

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  • Steven Smith
    Dioxin is released into the environment when products, especially those produced using a bleaching process, usually involving chlorinated chemicals--like many
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 6, 2008
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      Dioxin is released into the environment when products, especially those produced using a bleaching process, usually involving chlorinated chemicals--like many paper products--are burned. So don't burn it! Dioxin is only destroyed when sources are incinerated at very high temperatures. Burning household trash, plastic, and paper at the low temperatures achieved in a self fueled fire is now the single largest source of new dioxin releases into the environment in the United States. Better to compost it.

      Steve Smith
      Two Friends Farm
      Marshalltown, Iowa, USA




      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Jeff <shultonus@...>
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, August 6, 2008 9:13:09 PM
      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: deep mulching question RE: PAPER



      > I think this can also be a problem with toilet paper, which makes it
      > difficult to dispose of in a compost toilet. I haven't been able to
      > find any "biodegradable" toilet paper, but they sell a sort or
      > grayish toilet paper (the cheapest sort). It's hard to know
      > anything about the production process. Do you have any idea of
      > whether that would be save to use for composting? Also, what do you
      > think about recycled paper, does that contain all the contamination
      > of the paper that is recycled? Or are the contaminants normally
      > removed in the recycling process? Finally, what if I burn the
      > paper, do the contaminants remain in the ashes.

      I can't honestly remember the fate and transport mechanisms for
      dioxins. It's been a long time since I studied them I"ll have to do
      some research and see if I can find my old papers on the subject. It
      might take a while for a firm answer....

      I have seen one role of toliet paper that was bio-safe, and listed
      especially for use in septic systems (it chapped my ass though,
      literally), I'm not sure how they were defining the terms, or if it
      was meaningless market mojo.

      my gut instinct tells me dioxins are released into atmosphere via
      burning, and not left in the ashes, and are resistant to
      biodegradation via compost so I would do with that and avoid white
      white paper in stuff for human consumption.
      (newspaper is okay though...if the ink is safe)

      I know toliet paper typically has higher cotton content then office
      paper, and I know the bleaching process for cotton isn't as severe for
      cotton as wood pulp, but again I would need to look at this, I haven't
      ever seen a process flow for toliet paper specifically.

      >
      Jeff



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dieter Brand
      Thanks Jeff, I appreciate the effort. ...   Ah, don t we all have to make a little sacrifice.  It s all for a good cause.   Dieter ... From: Jeff
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 7, 2008
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        Thanks Jeff, I appreciate the effort.

        > it chapped my ass though, literally ...
         
        Ah, don't we all have to make a little sacrifice.  It's all for a good cause.
         
        Dieter

        --- On Thu, 8/7/08, Jeff <shultonus@...> wrote:

        From: Jeff <shultonus@...>
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: deep mulching question RE: PAPER
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, August 7, 2008, 3:13 AM







        > I think this can also be a problem with toilet paper, which makes it
        > difficult to dispose of in a compost toilet. I haven't been able to
        > find any "biodegradable" toilet paper, but they sell a sort or
        > grayish toilet paper (the cheapest sort). It's hard to know
        > anything about the production process. Do you have any idea of
        > whether that would be save to use for composting? Also, what do you
        > think about recycled paper, does that contain all the contamination
        > of the paper that is recycled? Or are the contaminants normally
        > removed in the recycling process? Finally, what if I burn the
        > paper, do the contaminants remain in the ashes.

        I can't honestly remember the fate and transport mechanisms for
        dioxins. It's been a long time since I studied them I"ll have to do
        some research and see if I can find my old papers on the subject. It
        might take a while for a firm answer....

        I have seen one role of toliet paper that was bio-safe, and listed
        especially for use in septic systems (it chapped my ass though,
        literally), I'm not sure how they were defining the terms, or if it
        was meaningless market mojo.

        my gut instinct tells me dioxins are released into atmosphere via
        burning, and not left in the ashes, and are resistant to
        biodegradation via compost so I would do with that and avoid white
        white paper in stuff for human consumption.
        (newspaper is okay though...if the ink is safe)

        I know toliet paper typically has higher cotton content then office
        paper, and I know the bleaching process for cotton isn't as severe for
        cotton as wood pulp, but again I would need to look at this, I haven't
        ever seen a process flow for toliet paper specifically.

        >
        Jeff


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • aesthete_aspirant
        This is concerning the toilet paper inquiries. In Hawai i we used leaves called Molokia. They may be called toilot paper tree or something else, somewhere
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 7, 2008
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          This is concerning the toilet paper inquiries. In Hawai'i we used
          leaves called Molokia. They may be called toilot paper tree or
          something else, somewhere else. It may take about 20 or more leaves
          for each visit to the toilet(for No2), in order to complete the job
          without getting feces on your hand. No worries though Molokia grows
          fast in tropical and sub-tropical areas. You can plant it all around
          your outside bathroom as a beautiful shield. When trimming any plant
          cut directly above a node diagonally. From this node comes new growth.
          Cutting diaganolly will allow water to flow off, as a straight cut
          would allow water to sit causing rot.
          Planted among this Molokia would be what else makes sense. Plants to
          clean your hands: such as noni, any citrus tree, aloe. Well that's all
          I got for now. Thank you for practicing living simple, One Love.

          -Brad
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