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Re: Industrial No-Till

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  • Jeff
    I just read an article in Scientific American s June issue on No Till Farming. It did mention the use of herbicides, etc, as you did. It was neither an
    Message 1 of 92 , Aug 1, 2008
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      I just read an article in Scientific American's June issue on No Till
      Farming. It did mention the use of herbicides, etc, as you did. It
      was neither an organic, nor a natural farming type of article. It
      was instead showing why there is an increase in no till farming, even
      though the yields, and losses are not satisfactory in the beginning.
      It did mention that Europe was behind in this method....that few are
      using it in Europe.
      >
      The thing about no-till industrial agriculture is a) step in the right
      direction.

      It reduces erosion by leaving more surface litter.
      It increases worms by a factor of 3-5.
      It increases organic carbon (OC) by 1-3%
      It holds nutrients better as a result of OC
      It increases infiltration as a function of OC and worms.
      It reduces pesticide and nutrient leaching, this is a function of the
      OC, the increased soil fungi, worms and increased efficiency.

      So while it does use herbicide to control weeds, it is much much
      friendly to the environment than tilled industrial.

      Adoption in Europe is reduced for several reasons.
      1) Higher initial cost of machinary (it takes different equipment).
      1a) Higher cost of herbicides (all the corp. are American)
      2) Higher levels of organic farming. (no herbicide).
      3) Higher uses of manure as fertilizer (increases OC),
      so the no-till effect is smaller
      4) Higher diversity of crops
      5) Less corn/soy rotation, which the no-till technology is most
      tried and true for. No-till wheat is just emerging
      6) Winter wheat (grown in Europe) does not have the same problems as
      leaving the ground fallow over the winter season
      7) Less wind erosion (associated with Prairie winters)
      8) Smaller farms (herbicide application is only efficient when large)
    • grannis04
      -No, the chicken layer pellets are poultry feed for laying hens. It is grain based feed but if you want complete ingredients maybe check the label on the bag
      Message 92 of 92 , Jun 22, 2009
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        -No, the chicken layer pellets are poultry feed for laying hens. It is grain based feed but if you want complete ingredients maybe check the label on the bag at your feed store. Steve G.



        fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, yarrow@... wrote:
        >
        > So are chicken layer pellets similar to Sluggo (iron phosphate
        > pellets), which is sold as a nontoxic (to pets and wildlife) snail
        > and slug remedy at about $5-10 (est.) a pound in the U.S.? What's in
        > them? Do birds eat them, or do you need to hide them (as with Sluggo)?
        >
        >
        > At 11:00 PM +0000 6/22/09, grannis04 wrote:
        > ---Micheal, I don't know what a chicken later pellet would be but
        > chicken layer pellets are fed to laying hens. This really works and
        > is very inexpensive. A 50lbs. bag is about $12.00 here. Good luck,
        > Steve G.
        > >
        > >
        > > Steve, what is a chicken later pellet?
        > > Michael
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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