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Re: Growing vegetables on the sea

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  • Jeff
    THis does sound promising, much more so than mining rock dust However, a word of caution, while seawater contains the whole gamut of micronutrients, it also
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 10, 2008
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      THis does sound promising, much more so than mining 'rock dust'

      However, a word of caution, while seawater contains the whole gamut of
      micronutrients, it also contains an excess of sodium (Na+) and
      Choloride (Cl-).

      Addition to soil could lead to sodic or saline soils (no soil
      structure, poor drainage). I would advise that sea solids not be used
      in 'at risk' sites.

      Any soil that qualifies as "clay" or any climate that requires
      irrigation for normal row crops.

      Clay soil would hold onto the salts, and because of the poor
      infiltration would not flush them from the soil.

      The drier climates are subject to saline build up due to inadequate
      depth penetration of water. (Drip irrigation is somewhat resistant to
      this process).

      Finally I would like to note that certain crops can use sodium in the
      place of some potassium (K in fertilizer), other seem to require small
      amounts to grow properly.

      Muskmelon (sometimes called Cantelope in the USA) and Sugarbeets
      all show improved growth in the presence of sodium. Including this
      crops in a rotation could mitigate these effects.






      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Linda Shewan"
      <linda_shewan@...> wrote:
      >
      > To the man who is trying to grow on a boat - this seems like it may
      be the
      > solution. Hydroponic with seasolids. Not at all natural farming but
      perhaps
      > diluting seawater would work as well and then it would be as natural
      as one
      > can imagine on a boat.
      >
      >
      >
      > http://www.ratical.org/ratville/SEA.html
      >
      >
      >
      > Cheers, Linda
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Linda Shewan
      Thanks for that information Jeff. I am picking up 20 litres of liquid sea minerals today from Pacific Salt in Melbourne, Australia. The sea minerals are what
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 10, 2008
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        Thanks for that information Jeff.



        I am picking up 20 litres of liquid sea minerals today from Pacific Salt in
        Melbourne, Australia. The sea minerals are what is left after they have
        extracted the sodium (to sell as table salt) so the salt content is not an
        issue - it is $44 for 20 litres which is a LOT cheaper than the bull kelp
        alternative of Seasol and I would imagine has more minerals... will check
        the analysis when I get it (I know I should have done it already....)



        The reason table salt is SO bad for you is because they have taken all the
        minerals out of it and sold them off to other buyers, chemical companies etc
        - Celtic or other natural sea salts retain these minerals.



        Cheers, Linda





        From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeff
        Sent: Wednesday, 11 June 2008 7:11 AM
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Growing vegetables on the sea



        THis does sound promising, much more so than mining 'rock dust'

        However, a word of caution, while seawater contains the whole gamut of
        micronutrients, it also contains an excess of sodium (Na+) and
        Choloride (Cl-).

        Addition to soil could lead to sodic or saline soils (no soil
        structure, poor drainage). I would advise that sea solids not be used
        in 'at risk' sites.

        Any soil that qualifies as "clay" or any climate that requires
        irrigation for normal row crops.

        Clay soil would hold onto the salts, and because of the poor
        infiltration would not flush them from the soil.

        The drier climates are subject to saline build up due to inadequate
        depth penetration of water. (Drip irrigation is somewhat resistant to
        this process).

        Finally I would like to note that certain crops can use sodium in the
        place of some potassium (K in fertilizer), other seem to require small
        amounts to grow properly.

        Muskmelon (sometimes called Cantelope in the USA) and Sugarbeets
        all show improved growth in the presence of sodium. Including this
        crops in a rotation could mitigate these effects.

        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com> , "Linda Shewan"
        <linda_shewan@...> wrote:
        >
        > To the man who is trying to grow on a boat - this seems like it may
        be the
        > solution. Hydroponic with seasolids. Not at all natural farming but
        perhaps
        > diluting seawater would work as well and then it would be as natural
        as one
        > can imagine on a boat.
        >
        >
        >
        > http://www.ratical.org/ratville/SEA.html
        >
        >
        >
        > Cheers, Linda
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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