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Weeds?!

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  • claytonbergman
    What methods are successful at controlling weeds in your area without resorting to cultivation, herbicides, or chemicals both synthetic and organic?
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 4, 2008
      What methods are successful at controlling weeds in your area without
      resorting to cultivation, herbicides, or chemicals both synthetic and
      organic?
    • Raju Titus
      *NO-WEEDING* ... crops, he began to regard other herbs with disgust as weeds and has striven ever since to remove them. But because the growth of weeds is
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 5, 2008
        *NO-WEEDING*

        ------ The moment that the farmer started caring for and raising
        crops, he began to regard other herbs with disgust as weeds and has striven
        ever since to remove them. But because the growth of weeds is natural, there
        is no end to their variety or to the labors of those who work to remove
        them.

        If one believes that crops grow with the aid of fertilizer, than the
        surrounding weeds must be removed because they rob the crop and plants of
        fertilizer. But in natural farming, where plants grow of their own accord
        without relying on fertilizers, the surrounding weeds do not pose any
        problem at all .Nothing is more natural than to see grass growing at the
        foot of a tree; no one ever think of that grass as interfering with the
        growth of the tree.

        In nature, bushes and shrubs grow at the foot of large trees ,
        grasses spread among the shrubs, and mosses flourish beneath the grasses.
        Instead of cut �throat competition for nutrients, this is a peaceful world
        of coexistence. Rather than seeing the grass as stunting shrub growth, and
        the shrubs as slowing the growth of trees, one should feel instead a sense
        of wonder and amazement the ability of these plants to grow together in this
        way.



        Weeds Enrich the Soil: Instead of pulling weeds, people should give some
        thought to the significance of these plants. Having done so, they will agree
        that the farmer should let the weeds live and make use of their strength.
        Although I call this the "no-weeding" principle, it could also be known as
        the principle of "weed utility".

        Long ago, when the earth begin to cool and the surface of the
        earth's crust weathered, forming soil, the first forms of life to appear
        were bacteria and lower form of plant life such as algae. All plants arose
        for a reason, and all plants live and thrive today for a reason. None is
        useless; each makes it own contribution to the development and enrichment of
        the biosphere. Such fertile soil would not have formed on the earth's
        surface had there been no microorganisms in the earth and grasses on the
        surface,. Grasses and other plants do not grow without a purpose.

        The deep penetration of grass roots in to the earth loosen the soil.
        When the roots die, this adds to the humus, allowing soil microbes to
        proliferate and enrich supporting earth worms, which eventually attract
        moles. Weeds and grasses are absolutely essential for a soil to remain
        organic and alive.
        Without grasses growing over the surface of the ground, rain water
        would wash away part of the top soil each year. Even in gently sloping
        areas, this would result in the loss of from several tons to perhaps well
        over hundred tons of soil per year. In twenty to thirty years, the top soil
        would wash entirely away, reducing soil fertility to essential zero. It
        would make more sense than for farmers to stop pulling weeds and begin
        making use of their considerable powers.-----
        FUKUOKA.
        BY RAJU TITUS
        NATURAL FARMER OF INDIA








        On 4/5/08, claytonbergman <claytonbergman@...> wrote:
        >
        > What methods are successful at controlling weeds in your area without
        > resorting to cultivation, herbicides, or chemicals both synthetic and
        > organic?
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bernhard Heuvel
        Hi, I threw the word weed out of my language. Every negative feedback is a lesson by nature. Look for the reasons for the negative feedback. Don t be
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 5, 2008
          Hi,

          I threw the word "weed" out of my language. Every negative feedback is a
          lesson by nature.

          Look for the reasons for the negative feedback. Don't be satisfied with
          solutions you have to buy. Or solutions that kill, rather than give birth.


          I plant perennial plants and trees. Than biannual plants. Annuals I
          plant in pots and buckets. No weed control necessary. I can do that,
          because I do it small-scale. If kept on a small scale everything works
          out better.

          Regards,

          Bernhard
        • Jeff
          ... my favorite control method is the lawn mower lol,... pretty much kills everything except grass and clover, and I don t mind the clover...
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 5, 2008
            --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "claytonbergman"
            <claytonbergman@...> wrote:
            >
            > What methods are successful at controlling weeds in your area without
            > resorting to cultivation, herbicides, or chemicals both synthetic and
            > organic?
            >
            my favorite control method is the lawn mower lol,...
            pretty much kills everything except grass and clover,
            and I don't mind the clover...
          • robin
            ... for my garden, scattering cover crop seeds (or enough of any kind of seeds of what i want to plant, in my case this season it s native and cereal grasses,
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 6, 2008
              --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "claytonbergman"
              <claytonbergman@...> wrote:
              >
              > What methods are successful at controlling weeds in your area without
              > resorting to cultivation, herbicides, or chemicals both synthetic and
              > organic?
              >
              for my garden, scattering cover crop seeds (or enough of any kind of
              seeds of what i want to plant, in my case this season it's native and
              cereal grasses, small legumes, brassicas, salad species, etc.) into
              the weeds consistently over several seasons has eventually turned my
              area( about 1/2 acre) into constantly changing but at the same time
              more and more
              stable communities of diverse plants, that is easy to plant vegetable
              seedlings, or fruit bush starts into and between.i am looking forward
              to consistently scattering all sorts of different types of seeds over
              my area, including herbs and forbes, grasses and dynamic accumulators
              such as those robert monie has listed in his previous posts. every
              day, i scatter one batch of seedballs, and separately at least a cup
              full of clover and legumes. i found out it's no good trying to put
              legumes into seedballs, they swell, and cracks and spoils your
              seedball. so i scatter legumes directly. any other seeds other than
              legumes will work in seedballs. i look forward and keep myself stocked
              with different types of seeds, diverse families of plants. this makes
              a sort of meadow that i really like, and it's fun to find new plant
              seeds. and over time, your better plants
              flourish under this kind of attention. i use my cutters alot and trim
              most of my out-of-control weed trees (such as wild cherry) to make
              them bushy more than tall (when a weed-tree seedling grows, after a
              year or so i'll cut it to the ground, and then when the suckers grow
              back i'll trim them to make it shorter and fuller for less over head
              shade since i already have enough tall trees right now.i want to have
              some more fruit trees, but i'm also trying to give my greed a rest. my
              goal is as many different
              plants as can grow in the least amount of space, be it weed or planted
              plant, but i want to achieve this goal at a steady, slow pace. i like
              my individual plant thick and full and healthy. fukuoka-san said to
              not distinguish among the plants, just make the garden a pleasant
              place for any plant to be. your goal is to have both weeds and
              productive plants, to stabilize, enrich, help each other out.


              in my wiry grass and aggressive rhizome areas, scattering clover and
              vetch in and around these
              will seem to contain or replace the growth. small soft weeds, medium
              and tall weeds each have many benefits, such as drawing insects,
              acting as nurse-plants, creating edge, and growing deep roots which
              feed the soil and draw up water and minerals, as well as being ready
              easy mulch and holding your soil together.
              the invasive, aggressive weeds (like honey suckle) i cut to the ground
              as much as possible (i never completely eradicate any species of
              plant) and use as mulch just right where or around where they fall. i
              cut them into pieces to make it easier to walk. i try to wait good and
              hard before i cut any weed, it may be the very thing that makes the
              garden "pop" better. but if i do, i only cut to the ground, not
              digging or pulling it up for no good reason. sometimes i replace a
              weed like dandelion with a tomato plant or something. then i eat the
              dandelion! i never use any pesticides or herbicides of any kind. in
              fact if a small insect infestation occurs, i only leave it completely
              alone in a kind of quarantine so the infestation can continue to it's
              natural end. by that time the offending insect's predator will have
              arrived to take care of the "problem". then the next year, i plant
              that particular veggie in a different spot. in my case those insects
              don't do as much damage on the plant the next year. sometimes weeds
              will act as a deterrent to infestations.

              when i plant a veg into the ground, i put straw around the plant to
              keep the weeds down around the plant. i may replenish this straw a
              couple of times until it is clear the plant can stand on it's own.

              with all this that i do, i still make many mistakes, sometimes
              repeatedly. over time, i am able to be more confident, remembering to
              consistently scatter seeds over and within any "problem" weeds, clover
              types being high on my list along with grasses, short, medium and
              tall. nature will then work itself out to form really rich and lovely
              cultures.
            • Matthew Minoprio
              Chickens in a Chicken tractor are my favourite weed control method. Sheet mulching can work well if the matterials are present (i.e. a huge amount of cardboard
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 6, 2008
                Chickens in a Chicken tractor are my favourite weed control method. Sheet mulching can work well if the matterials are present (i.e. a huge amount of cardboard and or newspaper, if using old carpet must use carpet that has not been treated with fire retardant chemicals).


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