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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Advise needed

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  • Raju Titus
    Dear friend, Do not fight with termites. Termites are very useful in Garden. Termites provide fertilizer by decomposing woody matter without water.It makes
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 19, 2008
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      Dear friend,
      Do not fight with termites. Termites are very useful in Garden. Termites
      provide fertilizer by decomposing woody matter without water.It makes land
      porous.If you will stop weeding, tilling and pruning in your4 acre plant
      Termites will stop eating green trees and other things.
      RajuTitus
      M.P.India.


      On 3/19/08, Sanjiv Mathur <symatin@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi
      > We live on our 4 acre farm in Jaipur ,Rajasthan ,India.Rajasthan is a
      > desert state and Jaipur is hot and dry through most of the year.We get
      > some rains in July- August from the south west monsoons.The soil is sandy
      > in nature.There is little underground water which is also fast depleting
      > due to growing number of bore wells and scanty rainfall.
      > We bought our land 20 yeras ago . At that time there were three trees
      > growing on it.
      > Over the years we have planted and cultivated a mixed variety of trees
      > which now number over 500 .
      > We have a major problem fighting termites.
      > And recently we have been hit by stem borers and we lost some 15 year olds
      > to them.
      > We are currently using chemicals to fight both of these .Although we have
      > started mixing a Neem extract with endosulfan which we inject into the stem
      > borer entry points to flush them out.
      > Does anyone have any experience / suggestions for using organic
      > /non-chemical products to fight this menace?
      > We would be grateful for any advise /inputs in this regard as we would be
      > very happy to discontinue using chemicals for pest control.
      > Thanks
      > Sanjiv Mathur
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bernhard Heuvel
      Hi Sanjiv, because I m from Germany I don t have experience with these particular pathogens. I hope I can help a bit by stating Bill Mollison, who once said:
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 20, 2008
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        Hi Sanjiv,

        because I'm from Germany I don't have experience with these particular
        pathogens. I hope I can help a bit by stating Bill Mollison, who once
        said: "You don't have a snail problem, you have a duck shortage
        problem." So much to eat, and no-one who eats it. This figures that you
        have to go away from the detail and observe the problem.

        Nature balances plants and animals out with the help of diversity and
        flexibility. That these "pests" occure is probably a sign, that there is
        something wrong. In permaculture this is called "negative feedback". You
        have to track the problem back to the roots, otherwise you'll get into
        the spiral of using pesticides more and more. To track back the problem
        observation on your farm has to be done. First hints:

        1.) How about the variety of plants?
        2.) How about variety of animals?
        3.) Is the soil hot or too warm? (Enough shade?)
        4.) How moist is the soil? (Ants love it dry. Termites? )
        5.) You planted a lot of trees - do you use up all the fruits? Or is
        there any fruit rottening on the feet of the trees?

        6.) Nature tries to get these trees down - what do you think why nature
        does want that? Why would nature do that?

        7.) Are there any natural "enemies" / eaters of termites and stem
        borers? I mean something like a duck, or chickens? Something that feeds
        on these?

        8.) Do you know of the life-cycle of the stem borer? Is there any time
        in the life of a stem borer he fells into the ground? Where chickens
        could scratch and get the borer?


        A further very good suggestions is the read of the following:

        http://www.sharebooks.ca/free_ebook_downloads.php?filename=ReturnToResistance.pdf


        This books explains the natural mechanisms of hosts and parasits. It
        definitely is worth a read.

        Wish you all the best, keep trying without chemicals as much as
        possible. Save the Earth.

        Regards,

        Bernhard
      • Douglas Barnes
        Dear Sanjiv, As has been mentioned, Paul Stamets (fungi.com) has termite control fungi (entomopathic fungi) and is working towards making it commercially
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 22, 2008
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          Dear Sanjiv,
          As has been mentioned, Paul Stamets (fungi.com) has termite control
          fungi (entomopathic fungi) and is working towards making it
          commercially available soon. I believe the species he has patented is
          a pre-sporulating form of Cordyceps lloydii. Insects largely interact
          with their world chemically and are very sensitive to chemical
          signals. If you can get some spores from Cordyceps lloydii, they would
          be very effective at repelling termites.
          If you see branches infected with borers, it is advised that they are
          trimmed off. If you have a flexible wire, you can push them into
          borer holes with the hope of squishing the borers. If you can get your
          hands on some beneficial nematodes (namely Steinernema carpocapsae –
          also known as Neoplectana carpocapsae, and Heterorhabditis
          heliothidis) , they can be injected into borer holes for quick control
          of the borers. Sorry that I cannot suggest any suppliers to help you
          out here.
          A more general approach is to look towards increasing soil fertility.
          Increased water storage would help with this, and it sounds like a
          serious problem in your area anyway. I put together an article to help
          with water catchment in dryland areas with a focus on Andhra Pradesh
          that you might find helpful:
          http://permaculturetokyo.blogspot.com/2007/03/water-catchment-strategies-for-drylands.html
          Increased water storage in the soil will help with soil fertility,
          which helps with tree health. Mulch applications help. Inoculating
          with mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus species, perhaps) will also help with
          health. Some amendments might help: kelp meal, bone meal. I do not
          know the geological history of Rajasthan. If you have not had a recent
          ice age, you might want to apply some rock dust.
          I hope that some of these suggestions can help you out a bit.
          Douglas Barnes


          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Sanjiv Mathur <symatin@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi
          > We live on our 4 acre farm in Jaipur ,Rajasthan ,India.Rajasthan
          is a desert state and Jaipur is hot and dry through most of the
          year.We get some rains in July- August from the south west
          monsoons.The soil is sandy in nature.There is little underground water
          which is also fast depleting due to growing number of bore wells and
          scanty rainfall.
          > We bought our land 20 yeras ago . At that time there were three
          trees growing on it.
          > Over the years we have planted and cultivated a mixed variety of
          trees which now number over 500 .
          > We have a major problem fighting termites.
          > And recently we have been hit by stem borers and we lost some 15
          year olds to them.
          > We are currently using chemicals to fight both of these .Although
          we have started mixing a Neem extract with endosulfan which we inject
          into the stem borer entry points to flush them out.
          > Does anyone have any experience / suggestions for using organic
          /non-chemical products to fight this menace?
          > We would be grateful for any advise /inputs in this regard as we
          would be very happy to discontinue using chemicals for pest control.
          > Thanks
          > Sanjiv Mathur
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo!
          Search.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Chandrakant Deokar
          Extremely good thoughts, Rajuji Chandrakant Deokar, Pune ... From: Raju Titus To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, March 20, 2008 8:19 AM
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 27, 2008
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            Extremely good thoughts, Rajuji

            Chandrakant Deokar, Pune

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Raju Titus
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, March 20, 2008 8:19 AM
            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Advise needed


            Dear friend,
            Do not fight with termites. Termites are very useful in Garden. Termites
            provide fertilizer by decomposing woody matter without water.It makes land
            porous.If you will stop weeding, tilling and pruning in your4 acre plant
            Termites will stop eating green trees and other things.
            RajuTitus
            M.P.India.

            On 3/19/08, Sanjiv Mathur <symatin@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi
            > We live on our 4 acre farm in Jaipur ,Rajasthan ,India.Rajasthan is a
            > desert state and Jaipur is hot and dry through most of the year.We get
            > some rains in July- August from the south west monsoons.The soil is sandy
            > in nature.There is little underground water which is also fast depleting
            > due to growing number of bore wells and scanty rainfall.
            > We bought our land 20 yeras ago . At that time there were three trees
            > growing on it.
            > Over the years we have planted and cultivated a mixed variety of trees
            > which now number over 500 .
            > We have a major problem fighting termites.
            > And recently we have been hit by stem borers and we lost some 15 year olds
            > to them.
            > We are currently using chemicals to fight both of these .Although we have
            > started mixing a Neem extract with endosulfan which we inject into the stem
            > borer entry points to flush them out.
            > Does anyone have any experience / suggestions for using organic
            > /non-chemical products to fight this menace?
            > We would be grateful for any advise /inputs in this regard as we would be
            > very happy to discontinue using chemicals for pest control.
            > Thanks
            > Sanjiv Mathur
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • arthur481947
            Hi Sanjiv, You have not specified kind of trees you planted. Also let me know if you have any pet or wild birds on your farm. Daniel Reuben - Israel ...
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 27, 2008
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              Hi Sanjiv,

              You have not specified kind of trees you planted. Also let me know if
              you have any pet or wild birds on your farm.

              Daniel Reuben - Israel


              --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Raju Titus" <rajuktitus@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Dear friend,
              > Do not fight with termites. Termites are very useful in Garden.
              Termites
              > provide fertilizer by decomposing woody matter without water.It
              makes land
              > porous.If you will stop weeding, tilling and pruning in your4 acre
              plant
              > Termites will stop eating green trees and other things.
              > RajuTitus
              > M.P.India.
              >
              >
              > On 3/19/08, Sanjiv Mathur <symatin@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi
              > > We live on our 4 acre farm in Jaipur ,Rajasthan ,India.Rajasthan
              is a
              > > desert state and Jaipur is hot and dry through most of the
              year.We get
              > > some rains in July- August from the south west monsoons.The soil
              is sandy
              > > in nature.There is little underground water which is also fast
              depleting
              > > due to growing number of bore wells and scanty rainfall.
              > > We bought our land 20 yeras ago . At that time there were three
              trees
              > > growing on it.
              > > Over the years we have planted and cultivated a mixed variety of
              trees
              > > which now number over 500 .
              > > We have a major problem fighting termites.
              > > And recently we have been hit by stem borers and we lost some 15
              year olds
              > > to them.
              > > We are currently using chemicals to fight both of these .Although
              we have
              > > started mixing a Neem extract with endosulfan which we inject
              into the stem
              > > borer entry points to flush them out.
              > > Does anyone have any experience / suggestions for using organic
              > > /non-chemical products to fight this menace?
              > > We would be grateful for any advise /inputs in this regard as we
              would be
              > > very happy to discontinue using chemicals for pest control.
              > > Thanks
              > > Sanjiv Mathur
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > > Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with
              Yahoo! Search.
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
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