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Re: Vetiver: a topsy-turvey garden view .

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  • Jeff
    ... factory of aromas from such volatile oils as nootkatone, cederene, and a variety of terpenoids, some of which seem attractive enough for Indians to craft
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 17, 2008
      > Hi Jeff,
      >
      > Vetiver root, often described as "sponge-like," exudes a chemical
      factory of aromas from such volatile oils as nootkatone, cederene, and
      a variety of terpenoids, some of which seem attractive enough for
      Indians to craft into perfume and perfumey window- and door-mats, and
      many of which are extremely offensive and repellant to insects and
      other pests. LSU Entomology School has a continuing study on this. (At
      least one masters thesis has been done so far).
      >


      Thanks Bob, Vetiver really seems like a very impressive plant!!
      Too bad I can't grow it here in ND>..
      I don't think the Dropseed will survive the dampness though either....

      ... hmmm I guess we'll just have to keep our eyes open,
      unfortunately, studies on root systems seem to be few and far between.


      > Now I am looking for other plants with similar properties. It
      would be wonderful to find an annual like this! Forbs by themselves
      add nutrients to the topsoil and make a little humus, but it's the way
      they work with the cover crops that really prepares the soil. All
      kinds of roots together, long, short, medium, horizontal and vertical,
      annual and perennial, fiberous and tap make a garden go!
      >
      > Would sand drop-seed and prairie drop-seed take root in soggy New
      Orleans?
      >
      > I'll talk all about Robert Elliot and his vision of underground
      mulching/composting with roots next time. Thanks for your interest.
      >
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