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Corn Farming in Northeastern United States!

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  • Ben Weiss
    Hey! Beggining this spring I will be attempting to set up a Fukuoka-style farm on a 5 acre plot here in south-central Pennsylvania. I am going to attempt to
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 13, 2008
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      Hey! Beggining this spring I will be attempting to set up a
      Fukuoka-style farm on a 5 acre plot here in south-central
      Pennsylvania. I am going to attempt to use the 3 sisters (corn, beans,
      and squash) mixed with sunflowers and clover, and intercropped with a
      winter grain.

      Has anyone tried such a thing?

      Can anyone provide some feedback on growing corn Fukuoka style?

      Thanksw and peace!
      -Ben Weiss
    • Calin A. Radulescu
      Hello Ben, Last time I tried it, modern corn didn t compete very well with the weeds at my location; if I tried that again, I would probably use Indian corn
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 13, 2008
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        Hello Ben,

        Last time I tried it, modern corn didn't compete very
        well with the weeds at my location; if I tried that
        again, I would probably use Indian corn and transplant
        it and spread the seedballs as well.
        Good luck with your project,

        calin.

        --- Ben Weiss <bazzrad@...> wrote:

        > Hey! Beggining this spring I will be attempting to
        > set up a
        > Fukuoka-style farm on a 5 acre plot here in
        > south-central
        > Pennsylvania. I am going to attempt to use the 3
        > sisters (corn, beans,
        > and squash) mixed with sunflowers and clover, and
        > intercropped with a
        > winter grain.
        >
        > Has anyone tried such a thing?
        >
        > Can anyone provide some feedback on growing corn
        > Fukuoka style?
        >
        > Thanksw and peace!
        > -Ben Weiss
        >
        >



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      • kikoricco
        I tried the three sisters last year on a small plot here in the NYC area. I grew inca rainbow from seeds of change, they have many fascianting varieties. I had
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 14, 2008
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          I tried the three sisters last year on a small plot here in the NYC area. I
          grew inca rainbow from seeds of change, they have many fascianting
          varieties. I had gotten free compost from the sanitation department and
          dumped it into hills and planted in them. The corn did great, but i
          planted the beans and squash too late and couldnt visit the plot for a
          month. When I came the grasses had shaded out the beans and squash
          but the corn was great, over 10 feet high. What I am going probably to
          try next in this area when I have the land is sowing buckwheat and vetch
          as a winter cover crop after the corn and in the spring one could just
          slash that and plant right in it.


          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Calin A. Radulescu"
          <crandrei@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hello Ben,
          >
          > Last time I tried it, modern corn didn't compete very
          > well with the weeds at my location; if I tried that
          > again, I would probably use Indian corn and transplant
          > it and spread the seedballs as well.
          > Good luck with your project,
          >
          > calin.
          >
          > --- Ben Weiss <bazzrad@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Hey! Beggining this spring I will be attempting to
          > > set up a
          > > Fukuoka-style farm on a 5 acre plot here in
          > > south-central
          > > Pennsylvania. I am going to attempt to use the 3
          > > sisters (corn, beans,
          > > and squash) mixed with sunflowers and clover, and
          > > intercropped with a
          > > winter grain.
          > >
          > > Has anyone tried such a thing?
          > >
          > > Can anyone provide some feedback on growing corn
          > > Fukuoka style?
          > >
          > > Thanksw and peace!
          > > -Ben Weiss
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          ____________________________________________________________
          ________________________
          > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
          > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
          >
        • JSENT
          conventional sweet corn does not seem to do well without loose soil and lot of fertilizer here in IL. I do well with broom corn and sorghum and okay with
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 14, 2008
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            conventional sweet corn does not seem to do well without loose soil and lot of fertilizer here in IL. I do well with broom corn and sorghum and okay with 'indian' and meal types, probably do better with direct applications of manure and better thinning/ weeding but thats getting away from fukuoka.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Dieter Brand
            Ben, Corn is OK, it will grow in an existing stand of weeds, but you may need some compost or manure to get a harvest. Beans don t need any manure, but they
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 14, 2008
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              Ben,

              Corn is OK, it will grow in an existing stand of weeds,
              but you may need some compost or manure to get
              a harvest. Beans don't need any manure, but they
              don't compete well in an existing stand of weeds or
              grass. Perhaps, if you mulch really heavily, 2 or
              more inches, it may work. Squash also needs
              some additional fertility: compost or manure.

              Dieter

              Ben Weiss <bazzrad@...> wrote:
              Hey! Beggining this spring I will be attempting to set up a
              Fukuoka-style farm on a 5 acre plot here in south-central
              Pennsylvania. I am going to attempt to use the 3 sisters (corn, beans,
              and squash) mixed with sunflowers and clover, and intercropped with a
              winter grain.

              Has anyone tried such a thing?

              Can anyone provide some feedback on growing corn Fukuoka style?

              Thanksw and peace!
              -Ben Weiss






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