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Re: Fukuokan Dogmatism

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  • JSENT
    Then our devotee stands up and decides to go to supermarket to buy some rice,flour and cow milk and butter. Why not, he is hungry! A wild landscape provides
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 8, 2008
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      "Then our devotee stands up and decides to go to supermarket to buy some rice,flour and cow milk and butter. Why not, he is hungry!"

      A wild landscape provides food too. Perhaps the devotee is hungry AND conditioned to industrialized fare (like myself). One year I rented land that was tilled each year for many years. The year I rented it was its first fallow year in the owner's memory. This annually tilled and sprayed land which had always grown food, not for people, but livestock, sent up plants on every square foot, a majority of them edible for humans. And this edible fare changed through the seasons. I added many to my offerings at the farmer's market, especially the spring greens. The owner was unhappy with the overgrowth but was pleased when hunters approached her to rent it after my time was up. It had become a great habitat for small game. Now it is back to tilled farmland and the hunters are unhappy but the farmer should be glad to have rested land with a lot of organic matter turned back.

      This may be exceptional land here in the grand prairie but this is an example of how our approach to what is considered food can affect our method of producing it. What food will the land grow without tilling it?

      cheers, jake
      grandprairiefood.com


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