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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Endo, Ecto and Edibles, our fungus friends.....

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  • Dieter Brand
    Jeff, According to scientists, plants in the cabbage family, beets, radishes, Swiss chard, etc. belong to the 10% or so of plants that don’t form a
    Message 1 of 5 , May 24, 2007
      Jeff,

      According to scientists, plants in the cabbage family, beets, radishes,
      Swiss chard, etc. belong to the 10% or so of plants that don’t form a
      mycorrhyzal relationship. I did a test last year with an inoculum produced
      according to a method you find under "make your own mycorrhizal
      inoculum". Unfortunately, somebody stole the fruit trees (pulled them
      out with roots and all) I inoculated. So I have no idea if there is any
      effect or not. I plan to give it another try in the future. However, I’m
      somewhat sceptical if all of this (EM, VAM, etc.) is of any use.

      The point is, soil already contains innumerable microorganisms, fungi,
      etc., all waiting for the right conditions to become active. Hence, it is
      far from certain that the introduction of some inoculum produced in a
      laboratory is of any benefit, especially if the conditions under which it is
      applied are not rigorously monitored. It is far more sensible to create
      the right conditions for all of these life forms in the soil to become
      active. Simple means for achieving this are the return of organic
      matter to the soil surface, conversion to no-till so as not to destroy
      the organic web and the avoidance of chemicals.


      Regards,
      Dieter Brand

      Jeff <shultonus@...> wrote:
      Hi all,

      I was wondering if anyone uses EM (effective micro-organisms), VAM
      (vascular mycorhyizal fungus) or edible mushrooms for growth
      enhancement of their garden/farm.

      I recently read Mycelium Running, it is a truely fascinating book.

      The part that most interested me was the growth enhancement of
      vegetables through the use of edible mushrooms.

      The Garden Giant and Elm Oyster both had significant growth
      enhancement. Plus the mushrooms harvested. Most fascinating was that
      fact that cole (broccoli/cabbage family) vegetables responded. From my
      reading into VAM fungus I thought that cole vegetables didn't respond
      to VAM treatment, I could be mis-remembering, though.

      Does anyone have any good data on VAM use? Does anyone know of any
      studies using edible mushrooms besides the one mentioned in Mycelium
      Running.

      ....






      ---------------------------------
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tradingpost
      Excellent point, mycorrhiza and all the other little guys are present almost everywhere. Exception: sterilized growing mediums, which are basically unnatural
      Message 2 of 5 , May 24, 2007
        Excellent point, mycorrhiza and all the other little guys are present
        almost everywhere. Exception: sterilized growing mediums, which are
        basically unnatural in the first place. The old maxim - feed the soil, the
        soil feeds the plants.

        paul tradingpost@...

        Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes.
        --Henry David Thoreau

        *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

        On 5/24/2007 at 2:51 PM Dieter Brand wrote:

        >Jeff,
        >
        > According to scientists, plants in the cabbage family, beets, radishes,
        > Swiss chard, etc. belong to the 10% or so of plants that don’t form a
        > mycorrhyzal relationship. I did a test last year with an inoculum
        >produced
        > according to a method you find under "make your own mycorrhizal
        > inoculum". Unfortunately, somebody stole the fruit trees (pulled them
        > out with roots and all) I inoculated. So I have no idea if there is any
        > effect or not. I plan to give it another try in the future. However,
        I’m
        > somewhat sceptical if all of this (EM, VAM, etc.) is of any use.
        >
        > The point is, soil already contains innumerable microorganisms, fungi,
        > etc., all waiting for the right conditions to become active. Hence, it
        is
        > far from certain that the introduction of some inoculum produced in a
        > laboratory is of any benefit, especially if the conditions under which
        >it is
        > applied are not rigorously monitored. It is far more sensible to create
        > the right conditions for all of these life forms in the soil to become
        > active. Simple means for achieving this are the return of organic
        > matter to the soil surface, conversion to no-till so as not to destroy
        > the organic web and the avoidance of chemicals.
        >
        >
        > Regards,
        > Dieter Brand
        >
      • Linda Shewan
        Hi, I have an EM Bokashi bucket at our office - only gets filled once a month - 6 weeks but it has done fantastic things in my garden in the spots where I have
        Message 3 of 5 , May 25, 2007
          Hi,



          I have an EM Bokashi bucket at our office - only gets filled once a month -
          6 weeks but it has done fantastic things in my garden in the spots where I
          have dug it in. I have no hard data to support my claims but the difference
          in growth between an EM cape gooseberry and a non-EM one was simply enormous
          - 4 times the growth with EM at least.



          Highly recommended! Particularly for offices - at home I use the chooks as
          scrap eaters, compost makers and turners instead. Some of our staff were
          hesitant when I said we were putting it in but all agree that it is great
          now. No smell, no mess - possibly helps that I do it all but still.



          Haven't done any edible mushrooms.



          Cheers, Linda



          From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeff
          Sent: Friday, 25 May 2007 3:09 AM
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Endo, Ecto and Edibles, our fungus friends.....



          Hi all,

          I was wondering if anyone uses EM (effective micro-organisms), VAM
          (vascular mycorhyizal fungus) or edible mushrooms for growth
          enhancement of their garden/farm.

          I recently read Mycelium Running, it is a truely fascinating book.

          The part that most interested me was the growth enhancement of
          vegetables through the use of edible mushrooms.

          The Garden Giant and Elm Oyster both had significant growth
          enhancement. Plus the mushrooms harvested. Most fascinating was that
          fact that cole (broccoli/cabbage family) vegetables responded. From my
          reading into VAM fungus I thought that cole vegetables didn't respond
          to VAM treatment, I could be mis-remembering, though.

          Does anyone have any good data on VAM use? Does anyone know of any
          studies using edible mushrooms besides the one mentioned in Mycelium
          Running.

          ....





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • The Lund family
          We use EM s and have been for 3 years, and so does an organic farmer friend of ours. He already had things going very well without the EM s, but the EM s gave
          Message 4 of 5 , May 25, 2007
            We use EM's and have been for 3 years, and so does an organic farmer
            friend of ours. He already had things going very well without the EM's,
            but the EM's gave him the final little boost that he needed to rid
            himself of the white fly hatches in his greenhouse. I am most
            experienced with their effect on the health of people and animals, with
            which I have been very impressed. It is the only "supplement" I give,
            besides unrefined salt, and I brew it myself very inexpensively. We
            extend out our brew over and over, so the cost is very minimal. Of
            course, they say it's "best" to not extend so much, but we are very
            satisfied with the results, so feel no need to spend more money on
            extra starter.

            We also make and sell an EM probiotic soap, and have a recipe for how
            to make it yourself on our website, if anyone is interested.

            Meg
            http://home-n-stead.com/soaps/ (soap for sale)
            http://home-n-stead.com/homestead/tipsandrecipes/ems.html (EM's for the
            homestead)
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