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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Compost

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  • Allan Balliett
    ... I always try to get at least one third high quality animal manure layered into my stacks. I would also work to get some finished compost to use to
    Message 1 of 7 , May 17, 2002
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      >Any suggestions about the pH that I should aim for in
      >compost? What else could I use to layer with the
      >root-bound sod that will hasten bacterial action?

      I always try to get at least one third high quality animal manure
      layered into my stacks. I would also work to get some finished
      compost to use to innoculate the new pile, especially if you have
      doubts about it.

      -Allan
    • emilia
      i m utterly confused about what all this about making compost is doing in an ag. site in which if one has any understanding of what natural agriculture is all
      Message 2 of 7 , May 17, 2002
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        i'm utterly confused about what all this about making compost is doing in an
        ag. site in which if one has any understanding of what natural agriculture
        is all about is to free oneself from the hazzle of making compost!

        o.k. souscayrous, i'll be calling u to know how to get to ur place.

        thanks robert for all the good & pertinent info!
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Allan Balliett" <igg@...>
        To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, May 17, 2002 12:58 PM
        Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Compost


        > >Any suggestions about the pH that I should aim for in
        > >compost? What else could I use to layer with the
        > >root-bound sod that will hasten bacterial action?
        >
        > I always try to get at least one third high quality animal manure
        > layered into my stacks. I would also work to get some finished
        > compost to use to innoculate the new pile, especially if you have
        > doubts about it.
        >
        > -Allan
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
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        >
        >
      • Adam Henne
        I wouldn t worry about aiming for a pH level. You get the compost you get, and you can test it when s it s done breaking down, and amend it accordingly when
        Message 3 of 7 , May 17, 2002
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          I wouldn't worry about "aiming" for a pH level. You
          get the compost you get, and you can test it when's
          it's done breaking down, and amend it accordingly when
          adding it to your soil. You might want to just try
          breaking up large chunks, with a chipper or just a
          machete or something, and add nitrogen-rich raw
          materials like grass clippings or manure.
          adam
          --- Zack Domike <arcada888@...> wrote:
          > A question on compost. I have built on a small
          > site,
          > and so lifted alot of sod. This is dense with roots
          > of shrubs, and not composting very rapidly. I have
          > the sod in piles elevated on stick "platforms."
          >
          > Any suggestions about the pH that I should aim for
          > in
          > compost? What else could I use to layer with the
          > root-bound sod that will hasten bacterial action?
          >
          > Thanks, Zachary
          >
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        • RobinFern�ndez-Medina
          In Mollisons books I read that a healthy soil tends to hover around a few Ph points from Neutral. Natural action corrects Ph is what I understood. Do nothing
          Message 4 of 7 , May 18, 2002
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            In Mollisons books I read that a healthy soil tends to hover around a few Ph points from Neutral. Natural action corrects Ph is what I understood. Do nothing approach.
            Robin
            Allan Balliett <igg@...> wrote: >Any suggestions about the pH that I should aim for in
            >compost? What else could I use to layer with the
            >root-bound sod that will hasten bacterial action?

            I always try to get at least one third high quality animal manure
            layered into my stacks. I would also work to get some finished
            compost to use to innoculate the new pile, especially if you have
            doubts about it.

            -Allan

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          • souscayrous
            The intuitive appeal of compost is manifest: the organic movement has sought the perfect compost as its holy grail for almost a century now. I suppose the
            Message 5 of 7 , May 18, 2002
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              The intuitive appeal of compost is manifest: the organic movement has sought
              the perfect compost as its holy grail for almost a century now. I suppose
              the first thing we must realise is that Natural Farming is not Organic
              Farming. This is how Fukuoka puts it in The One-Straw Revolution (page 13 of
              the pdf version found in this groups files section);


              "The second is NO CHEMICAL FERTILIZER OR PREPARED COMPOST People interfere
              with nature and, try as they may, they cannot heal the resulting wounds.
              Their careless farming practices drain the soil of essential nutrients and
              the result is yearly depletion of the land. If left to itself, the soil
              maintains its fertility naturally, in accordance with the orderly cycle of
              plant and animal life."

              And, again, on the following page (14), he goes on to illustrates the
              confused thinking of modern agricultural practices (a mind-set that organic
              agriculture shares);


              "I have been known, in chatting with soil fertility experts, to ask, "If a
              field is left to itself, will the soil's fertility increase or will it
              become depleted?” They usually pause and say something like, "Well, let's
              see ... It'll become depleted. No, not when you remember that when rice is
              grown for a long time in the same field without fertilizer, the harvest
              settles at about 9 bushels (525 pounds) per quarter acre. The earth would
              become neither enriched nor depleted."
              These specialists are referring to a cultivated, flooded field; if nature
              is left to itself, fertility increases. Organic remains of plants and
              animals accumulate and are decomposed on the surface by bacteria and fungi.
              With the movement of rainwater, the nutrients are taken deep into the soil
              to become food for microorganisms, earthworms, and other small animals.
              Plant roots reach to the lower soil strata and draw the nutrients back up to
              the surface."


              Simple alternatives to compost for soil improvement are cover crops, green
              manures, and mulching with whatever you have to hand. Check out the archive
              section of this group for some previous discussion concerning soil
              improvement.
              The essential difference would seem to be to not incorporate anything
              directly into the soil but let it be drawn in by the action of earthworms,
              rain, microbial breakdown etc: in other words to let the soil work on the
              organic matter at its own natural rate, if not..."(such) practices drain the
              soil of essential nutrients and the result is the yearly depletion of the
              land."


              Souscayrous...enjoying the bountiful rainfall of Spring


              -----Original Message-----
              From: Robin Fernández-Medina [mailto:flyingdebris1@...]
              Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2002 6:25 PM
              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Compost



              In Mollisons books I read that a healthy soil tends to hover around a few
              Ph points from Neutral. Natural action corrects Ph is what I understood. Do
              nothing approach.
              Robin
              Allan Balliett <igg@...> wrote: >Any suggestions about the pH that I
              should aim for in
              >compost? What else could I use to layer with the
              >root-bound sod that will hasten bacterial action?

              I always try to get at least one third high quality animal manure
              layered into my stacks. I would also work to get some finished
              compost to use to innoculate the new pile, especially if you have
              doubts about it.

              -Allan
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