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  • RobinFern´┐Żndez-Medina
    Hi Emilia and all, First of all sorry to everyone for forwarding that last heard it on the news Email . I checked the wrong box. My pardons for distributing
    Message 1 of 3 , May 17, 2002
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      Hi Emilia and all,
      First of all sorry to everyone for forwarding that last "heard it on the news Email". I checked the wrong box. My pardons for distributing it.
      Thanks for your response. I guess two years is quite new to organic or natural farming. I have used several different techniques in pest control, high alkali soaps, copper, interplanting rosemary and lavender, as well as offering sacrificial plants to attract some of the most pesky. I noticed it takes a time for things to balance out. I use beer in a cup to trap slugs, or tiles that they can get under for cool. These are some techniques I have learnt from reading and others and was interested in hearing of others. This year I have seen ladybugs return in numbers larger than last year as well as more butterflies which could be good or bad.
      emilia <emhaz@...> wrote: hi robert,
      do u know if the NFTA still exists somewhere? years ago they used to be in
      hawaii, i really would like to know of their work again, they also had
      excellent publications, info, on nitrogen fixing plants.
      thanks!
      about pests, etc. robin, are u totally new to organic agriculture, or
      only to the natural one?
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Robert Monie" <bobm20001@...>
      To: <Fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, May 11, 2002 12:02 AM
      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] More on nitrogen-fixing plants for temperate
      climates


      > Martin Crawford, a prolific author on agroforestry and
      > director of the Agroforestry Research Trust (founded
      > by James Lovelock, co-author of the "Gaia hypothesis)
      > in England has written an 87-page booklet (ISBN
      > 1-874275-25-4) called "Nitrogen-Fixing Plants for
      > Temperate Climates." The advertisment for the booklet
      > notes that "most people only know of the legumes as
      > nitrogen fixers; however, there are several other
      > plant groups which do so, notably the so-called
      > actinorhizal plants (including alders, Elaeagnus, sea
      > buckthorn), which are mostly of temperate origin and
      > better suited to cool temperate climates." Crawford's
      > book on temperate climate nitrogen fixers is dated
      > 1995 and is advertised on the Agroforestry Research
      > Trust website:
      > http://www.agroforestry.co.uk
      >
      > Nitrogen-fixing can be a very recondite and forbidding
      > subject when presented by the usual gatherings of soil
      > specialists and microbiologists. I am not aware of
      > many "chatty" and user-friendly presentations of this
      > subject in print, so Crawford's could prove welcome.
      >
      > Here in New Orleans, the Louisiana Nursery and
      > Landscape Association and the Louisiana Cooperative
      > Extension Service have issued "Tree Ratings for the
      > New Orleans Area." In this report, they relegate two
      > popular nitrogen-fixing trees--the Mimosa (Albizzia
      > julibrissin) and the Black Locust (Robinia
      > pseudoacacia) to the very bottom of the list with a
      > "Rating 4 (Poor)" category. In their experience,
      > these two trees are problematic in New Orleans for one
      > or more of the following 5 reasons: poor life
      > expectancy, poor aesthetic qualities, susceptibility
      > to insect and disease problems, lack of adaptability
      > to climate and urban conditions, and amount of
      > maintenance required. They are no more specific than
      > this, but they
      > dislike these two trees for our ecology and climate.
      >
      > I'm wondering if we would do better in Southern
      > Louisiana with shrub-like nitrogen-fixing plants
      > rather than nitrogen-fixing trees. The Amorpha
      > fruitcosa or "false indigo" is a likely prospect.
      >
      > Any comments would be appreciated.
      >
      >
      >
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