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RE: Seed Balls

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  • Douglas Barnes
    Jojo, You might try contacting the BCIL Alt. Tech Foundation at http://millionseedballs.org/ Douglas JE Barnes EcoEdge Design http://www.ecoedge.ca
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 14, 2007
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      Jojo,

      You might try contacting the BCIL Alt. Tech Foundation at
      http://millionseedballs.org/


      Douglas JE Barnes
      EcoEdge Design
      http://www.ecoedge.ca
      http://permaculturetokyo.blogspot.com
      dbarnes@...


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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Radha Eswar
      Dear Jojo, I hadn t checked my mails for some time and missed reading your mail till now. BCIL-Altech Foundation has scattered seedballs in your area. Has Dr.
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 14, 2007
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        Dear Jojo,

        I hadn't checked my mails for some time and missed reading your mail till
        now. BCIL-Altech Foundation has scattered seedballs in your area. Has Dr.
        Subba Rao been transferred? In fact Michiyo, Wakka, Vandana and myself
        visited the sites last year and found that the rains had failed and hence
        only a few seedballs had sprouted. What is the situation now?

        Why dont you call up Sunil in BCIL at 40184018, Bangalore? I helped the
        organisation make the seedballs through a lot of schools in Bangalore. What
        exactly do you want to know?

        All the very best!
        warm regards
        Radha

        On 13 Mar 2007 05:58:43 -0700, FES Chintamani <
        chintamani.fes@...> wrote:
        >
        > Could some one please tell me as to where I could get more information
        > on seedballs. By the way I work with an NGO called Foundation for Ecological
        > Securityin the south Indian state of Karnataka.
        > Regards and best wishes
        >
        > jojo
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Jeff
        > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 1:45 AM
        > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Progression: more details
        >
        > I live in zone 4 borderline to zone 3 mn/nd
        > THe other primary weed in question
        > is also known as horseweed aka Erigeron canadensis
        >
        > It gets sun from about 10 am until just about dusk.
        > It is close to swamp also, during spring water table is generally
        > within a foot of the surface....
        >
        > The raspberries are wild, never been cut back,
        > but have competition from poison ivy, sumac and dogwood,,,...
        > I'm discouraging the ivy, encouraging the sumac, and nuetral about the
        > dogwood...
        >
        > the rasberries are only in direct sun 4-6 hours a day...
        > I know the good properties of mullein so I don't mind it,
        > but it doesn't get me fed.. lol... i keep thinking someday
        > I"ll discover a use for the gazillion seeds each plant produces...
        >
        > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > "debhlv" <debhlv@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > I have never seen nor heard of Jerusalem Artichoke being invasive.
        > Is it, in your area? Yo, I
        > > love the stuff, and wish it grew here with more abundance!! Love to
        > serve up that nice
        > > black stuff to unsuspecting folk, and have them fall in love! <G>
        > >
        > > That Mullein, btw, is some of the best medicine you can have for
        > those who do hard work
        > > for a living; like homestead/farmer types. It is one of the finest
        > herbs for helping back
        > > troubles, joint troubles, and is also (most folk know of these
        > applications) for respiratory
        > > problems. Not "food", but is such a gentle, effective, and
        > all-purpose healing and useful
        > > herb, I'd certainly think twice before dismissing it. It also is a
        > great plant for opening up
        > > hardpan and other depleted soils- one reason it's growing where it
        > is now. So, if you don't
        > > want it where it's at, why not propagate it where you have some soil
        > that isn't doing so
        > > well?
        > >
        > > How about some asparagus? I remember this simply because this plant
        > was discussed
        > > elsewhere that I read this morn- but asparagus is some mighty fine
        > eats, and easy as an
        > > old log to care for.
        > >
        > > Am not certain what you mean by "mules tail" do you by any chance
        > know the botanical
        > > name for it, or have/have links to pics of it?
        > >
        > > If you can grow the egyptians, you can grow some fine garlic, too.
        > >
        > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com<fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > "garden03048" <apdirusso@>
        > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com<fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > "Jeff" <shultonus@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > So I have this weekend spot in lake country that I go to in the
        > > > summer.
        > > > > It has rhubarb that doesn't do too good (too shaded, i think)
        > > > >
        > > > > I put some egyptian onoins there and they love it,
        > > > > but its an old (very sandy) strawberry patch, that is bassically
        > > > just
        > > > > weeds. mostly grass and mules tail and mullen, not much that 's even
        > > > > edible.
        > > > >
        > > > > What vegetables and other perrenials would you recommend plannting
        > > > > to make this space more edible.
        > > > >
        > > > > I'm trying to decide wether I want to put jerusam artichokes there
        > > > or
        > > > > not, i have some here in a planter, but they're wild, and not
        > > > improved
        > > > > so the tubers are really small..., and they're invasive,...
        > > > >
        > > > > and what can I do to make the wild raspberries more productive...
        > > > they
        > > > > only have one or 2 berries per bush....
        > > > >
        > > > > Jeff
        > > > >
        > > > Jeff,
        > > >
        > > > it would help to know where the lake country is - what zone? If
        > > > there are trees around, collect the leaves and use as mulch, or pile
        > > > them up this year and use the compost next year. How shady is the
        > > > spot? Some vegies can take more shade than others. have the
        > > > raspberries ever been pruned or cut back?
        > > >
        > > > anthony NH zone 5
        > > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Etem Tezcan
        From http://millionseedballs.org/index.php?q=node/46 I can see that only tree seeds were scattered. Did you think about mixing legume and grass seeds with tree
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 15, 2007
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          From

          http://millionseedballs.org/index.php?q=node/46

          I can see that only tree seeds were scattered. Did you think about

          mixing legume and grass seeds with tree seeds so that sprouting legume

          and grass seeds may create a more suitable condition for sproution of tree
          seeds.



          Thanks,

          Etem Tezcan









          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Sara Mandal-Joy
          Does anyone know which of the links on seedball.com are the ones relating to seedballs? Seems to be a whole lot of other stuff there, didn t click on all the
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 15, 2007
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            Does anyone know which of the links on seedball.com are the ones
            relating to seedballs? Seems to be a whole lot of other stuff there,
            didn't click on all the links, but so far found nothing relating to
            seedballs. Sara
          • Linda Shewan
            www.seedballs.com was taken over by another group - there is no seedballs information on there anymore. Linda From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 15, 2007
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              www.seedballs.com was taken over by another group - there is no seedballs
              information on there anymore. Linda



              From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sara Mandal-Joy
              Sent: Friday, 16 March 2007 3:07 AM
              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seed Balls



              Does anyone know which of the links on seedball.com are the ones
              relating to seedballs? Seems to be a whole lot of other stuff there,
              didn't click on all the links, but so far found nothing relating to
              seedballs. Sara





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • FES Chintamani
              Dear Radha, Thanks for your mail. Subba Rao is going to leave the organisation by the end of this month. Otherwise we were planning to conduct the Seed Ball
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 16, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Dear Radha,
                Thanks for your mail.
                Subba Rao is going to leave the organisation by the end of this month. Otherwise we were planning to conduct the Seed Ball programme this year, albiet with slight changes compared to last years. I had written the mail thinking we could get some ideas regarding the same. Like someone has suggested that probably it would be a good idea to mixing legume and grass seeds with tree seeds so that sprouting legume and grass seeds may create a more suitable condition for sproution of tree
                seeds. The germination rates vary between 20-25% , same as the case when you and others had come down here.
                We will be in touch with you in the next few months in this regard

                Best wishes

                Jojo


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Radha Eswar
                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2007 6:05 AM
                Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Seed Balls


                Dear Jojo,

                I hadn't checked my mails for some time and missed reading your mail till
                now. BCIL-Altech Foundation has scattered seedballs in your area. Has Dr.
                Subba Rao been transferred? In fact Michiyo, Wakka, Vandana and myself
                visited the sites last year and found that the rains had failed and hence
                only a few seedballs had sprouted. What is the situation now?

                Why dont you call up Sunil in BCIL at 40184018, Bangalore? I helped the
                organisation make the seedballs through a lot of schools in Bangalore. What
                exactly do you want to know?

                All the very best!
                warm regards
                Radha

                On 13 Mar 2007 05:58:43 -0700, FES Chintamani <
                chintamani.fes@...> wrote:
                >
                > Could some one please tell me as to where I could get more information
                > on seedballs. By the way I work with an NGO called Foundation for Ecological
                > Securityin the south Indian state of Karnataka.
                > Regards and best wishes
                >
                > jojo
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Jeff
                > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 1:45 AM
                > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Progression: more details
                >
                > I live in zone 4 borderline to zone 3 mn/nd
                > THe other primary weed in question
                > is also known as horseweed aka Erigeron canadensis
                >
                > It gets sun from about 10 am until just about dusk.
                > It is close to swamp also, during spring water table is generally
                > within a foot of the surface....
                >
                > The raspberries are wild, never been cut back,
                > but have competition from poison ivy, sumac and dogwood,,,...
                > I'm discouraging the ivy, encouraging the sumac, and nuetral about the
                > dogwood...
                >
                > the rasberries are only in direct sun 4-6 hours a day...
                > I know the good properties of mullein so I don't mind it,
                > but it doesn't get me fed.. lol... i keep thinking someday
                > I"ll discover a use for the gazillion seeds each plant produces...
                >
                > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
                > "debhlv" <debhlv@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > I have never seen nor heard of Jerusalem Artichoke being invasive.
                > Is it, in your area? Yo, I
                > > love the stuff, and wish it grew here with more abundance!! Love to
                > serve up that nice
                > > black stuff to unsuspecting folk, and have them fall in love! <G>
                > >
                > > That Mullein, btw, is some of the best medicine you can have for
                > those who do hard work
                > > for a living; like homestead/farmer types. It is one of the finest
                > herbs for helping back
                > > troubles, joint troubles, and is also (most folk know of these
                > applications) for respiratory
                > > problems. Not "food", but is such a gentle, effective, and
                > all-purpose healing and useful
                > > herb, I'd certainly think twice before dismissing it. It also is a
                > great plant for opening up
                > > hardpan and other depleted soils- one reason it's growing where it
                > is now. So, if you don't
                > > want it where it's at, why not propagate it where you have some soil
                > that isn't doing so
                > > well?
                > >
                > > How about some asparagus? I remember this simply because this plant
                > was discussed
                > > elsewhere that I read this morn- but asparagus is some mighty fine
                > eats, and easy as an
                > > old log to care for.
                > >
                > > Am not certain what you mean by "mules tail" do you by any chance
                > know the botanical
                > > name for it, or have/have links to pics of it?
                > >
                > > If you can grow the egyptians, you can grow some fine garlic, too.
                > >
                > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com<fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
                > "garden03048" <apdirusso@>
                > wrote:
                > > >
                > > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com<fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
                > "Jeff" <shultonus@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > So I have this weekend spot in lake country that I go to in the
                > > > summer.
                > > > > It has rhubarb that doesn't do too good (too shaded, i think)
                > > > >
                > > > > I put some egyptian onoins there and they love it,
                > > > > but its an old (very sandy) strawberry patch, that is bassically
                > > > just
                > > > > weeds. mostly grass and mules tail and mullen, not much that 's even
                > > > > edible.
                > > > >
                > > > > What vegetables and other perrenials would you recommend plannting
                > > > > to make this space more edible.
                > > > >
                > > > > I'm trying to decide wether I want to put jerusam artichokes there
                > > > or
                > > > > not, i have some here in a planter, but they're wild, and not
                > > > improved
                > > > > so the tubers are really small..., and they're invasive,...
                > > > >
                > > > > and what can I do to make the wild raspberries more productive...
                > > > they
                > > > > only have one or 2 berries per bush....
                > > > >
                > > > > Jeff
                > > > >
                > > > Jeff,
                > > >
                > > > it would help to know where the lake country is - what zone? If
                > > > there are trees around, collect the leaves and use as mulch, or pile
                > > > them up this year and use the compost next year. How shady is the
                > > > spot? Some vegies can take more shade than others. have the
                > > > raspberries ever been pruned or cut back?
                > > >
                > > > anthony NH zone 5
                > > >
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Etem Tezcan
                Original www.seedballs.com is now pointed to a strange web page. Try web archive
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 16, 2007
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                  Original

                  www.seedballs.com <http://www.seedballs.com/>

                  is now pointed to a strange web page.

                  Try web archive

                  http://web.archive.org/web/20050326090847/www.seedballs.com

                  Regards,

                  Etem



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • seaseal
                  These wonderful inventions by Masanobu Fukuoka solved several problems: --birds eating seeds --seeds sprouting before sufficient moisture existed --getting
                  Message 8 of 11 , Sep 27, 2009
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                    These wonderful inventions by Masanobu Fukuoka solved several problems:
                    --birds eating seeds
                    --seeds sprouting before sufficient moisture existed
                    --getting seed, especially smaller seed, distributed.

                    Making seed balls is fun--we recently had a "Seed Ball Party" with my
                    Sustainable Re-skilling Group.

                    We took potting soil, semi-moist compost, and locally gathered native
                    plant seeds, with a little clay powder added. We added just a little
                    clay powder (ground up unfired clay art projects or, actual clay that
                    has been finely ground up). We saved the rest of the clay powder in a
                    flat pan.

                    We gooshed this all up and then let the balls sit for a bit to dry out.

                    Then we rolled the balls in the pan of clay powder to coat the outside
                    totally with clay.

                    We then let them dry. We had collected lots of low, flat cardboard
                    boxes (the kind sodas often come in; we got them from the liquor
                    store) to carry our seed balls home.

                    Many of us tossed a few out the windows of our cars or off the back of
                    our bikes as we returned home. We chose likely spots, such as the
                    verge alongside the road where some shade existed.

                    We know these balls will protect the seed until enough rain has fallen
                    to break open the clay seal. The seeds then have all the nutrient they
                    need to get started.

                    This is a great project to do with kids, but adults really enjoy this
                    activity too. It's a really good one for doing a Fukuoka-style garden,
                    with radish, lettuce, carrots, tomatoes, and more.

                    For more about seed balls, just google the topic. You'll find lots of
                    ideas.

                    Cecile
                    seaseal@...


                    We see things, not as they are,
                    but as we are.
                    --Anais Nin
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