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Re: Progression

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  • debhlv
    I have never seen nor heard of Jerusalem Artichoke being invasive. Is it, in your area? Yo, I love the stuff, and wish it grew here with more abundance!!
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 15, 2007
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      I have never seen nor heard of Jerusalem Artichoke being invasive. Is it, in your area? Yo, I
      love the stuff, and wish it grew here with more abundance!! Love to serve up that nice
      black stuff to unsuspecting folk, and have them fall in love! <G>

      That Mullein, btw, is some of the best medicine you can have for those who do hard work
      for a living; like homestead/farmer types. It is one of the finest herbs for helping back
      troubles, joint troubles, and is also (most folk know of these applications) for respiratory
      problems. Not "food", but is such a gentle, effective, and all-purpose healing and useful
      herb, I'd certainly think twice before dismissing it. It also is a great plant for opening up
      hardpan and other depleted soils- one reason it's growing where it is now. So, if you don't
      want it where it's at, why not propagate it where you have some soil that isn't doing so
      well?

      How about some asparagus? I remember this simply because this plant was discussed
      elsewhere that I read this morn- but asparagus is some mighty fine eats, and easy as an
      old log to care for.

      Am not certain what you mean by "mules tail" do you by any chance know the botanical
      name for it, or have/have links to pics of it?

      If you can grow the egyptians, you can grow some fine garlic, too.

      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "garden03048" <apdirusso@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <shultonus@> wrote:
      > >
      > > So I have this weekend spot in lake country that I go to in the
      > summer.
      > > It has rhubarb that doesn't do too good (too shaded, i think)
      > >
      > > I put some egyptian onoins there and they love it,
      > > but its an old (very sandy) strawberry patch, that is bassically
      > just
      > > weeds. mostly grass and mules tail and mullen, not much that 's even
      > > edible.
      > >
      > > What vegetables and other perrenials would you recommend plannting
      > > to make this space more edible.
      > >
      > > I'm trying to decide wether I want to put jerusam artichokes there
      > or
      > > not, i have some here in a planter, but they're wild, and not
      > improved
      > > so the tubers are really small..., and they're invasive,...
      > >
      > > and what can I do to make the wild raspberries more productive...
      > they
      > > only have one or 2 berries per bush....
      > >
      > > Jeff
      > >
      > Jeff,
      >
      > it would help to know where the lake country is - what zone? If
      > there are trees around, collect the leaves and use as mulch, or pile
      > them up this year and use the compost next year. How shady is the
      > spot? Some vegies can take more shade than others. have the
      > raspberries ever been pruned or cut back?
      >
      > anthony NH zone 5
      >
    • celebrate everyday blessings
      If you can handle an unusual recommendation, I ve heard peeing on rhubarb does wonders, so maybe yours needs a boost.
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 15, 2007
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        If you can handle an unusual recommendation, I've heard peeing on rhubarb does wonders, so maybe
        yours needs a boost.



        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
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      • celebratethepresent
        Here is more on my urine therapy suggestion. Pee in a 5 gallon bucket and fill with water. Pour on the soil. Also I hear rhubarb needs sun.
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 15, 2007
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          Here is more on my urine therapy suggestion. Pee in a 5 gallon bucket and fill with water.
          Pour on the soil. Also I hear rhubarb needs sun.
          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "garden03048" <apdirusso@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <shultonus@> wrote:
          > >
          > > So I have this weekend spot in lake country that I go to in the
          > summer.
          > > It has rhubarb that doesn't do too good (too shaded, i think)
          > >
          > > I put some egyptian onoins there and they love it,
          > > but its an old (very sandy) strawberry patch, that is bassically
          > just
          > > weeds. mostly grass and mules tail and mullen, not much that 's even
          > > edible.
          > >
          > > What vegetables and other perrenials would you recommend plannting
          > > to make this space more edible.
          > >
          > > I'm trying to decide wether I want to put jerusam artichokes there
          > or
          > > not, i have some here in a planter, but they're wild, and not
          > improved
          > > so the tubers are really small..., and they're invasive,...
          > >
          > > and what can I do to make the wild raspberries more productive...
          > they
          > > only have one or 2 berries per bush....
          > >
          > > Jeff
          > >
          > Jeff,
          >
          > it would help to know where the lake country is - what zone? If
          > there are trees around, collect the leaves and use as mulch, or pile
          > them up this year and use the compost next year. How shady is the
          > spot? Some vegies can take more shade than others. have the
          > raspberries ever been pruned or cut back?
          >
          > anthony NH zone 5
          >
        • Jeff
          I live in zone 4 borderline to zone 3 mn/nd THe other primary weed in question is also known as horseweed aka Erigeron canadensis It gets sun from about 10 am
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 15, 2007
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            I live in zone 4 borderline to zone 3 mn/nd
            THe other primary weed in question
            is also known as horseweed aka Erigeron canadensis

            It gets sun from about 10 am until just about dusk.
            It is close to swamp also, during spring water table is generally
            within a foot of the surface....

            The raspberries are wild, never been cut back,
            but have competition from poison ivy, sumac and dogwood,,,...
            I'm discouraging the ivy, encouraging the sumac, and nuetral about the
            dogwood...

            the rasberries are only in direct sun 4-6 hours a day...
            I know the good properties of mullein so I don't mind it,
            but it doesn't get me fed.. lol... i keep thinking someday
            I"ll discover a use for the gazillion seeds each plant produces...






            --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "debhlv" <debhlv@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have never seen nor heard of Jerusalem Artichoke being invasive.
            Is it, in your area? Yo, I
            > love the stuff, and wish it grew here with more abundance!! Love to
            serve up that nice
            > black stuff to unsuspecting folk, and have them fall in love! <G>
            >
            > That Mullein, btw, is some of the best medicine you can have for
            those who do hard work
            > for a living; like homestead/farmer types. It is one of the finest
            herbs for helping back
            > troubles, joint troubles, and is also (most folk know of these
            applications) for respiratory
            > problems. Not "food", but is such a gentle, effective, and
            all-purpose healing and useful
            > herb, I'd certainly think twice before dismissing it. It also is a
            great plant for opening up
            > hardpan and other depleted soils- one reason it's growing where it
            is now. So, if you don't
            > want it where it's at, why not propagate it where you have some soil
            that isn't doing so
            > well?
            >
            > How about some asparagus? I remember this simply because this plant
            was discussed
            > elsewhere that I read this morn- but asparagus is some mighty fine
            eats, and easy as an
            > old log to care for.
            >
            > Am not certain what you mean by "mules tail" do you by any chance
            know the botanical
            > name for it, or have/have links to pics of it?
            >
            > If you can grow the egyptians, you can grow some fine garlic, too.
            >
            > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "garden03048" <apdirusso@>
            wrote:
            > >
            > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <shultonus@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > So I have this weekend spot in lake country that I go to in the
            > > summer.
            > > > It has rhubarb that doesn't do too good (too shaded, i think)
            > > >
            > > > I put some egyptian onoins there and they love it,
            > > > but its an old (very sandy) strawberry patch, that is bassically
            > > just
            > > > weeds. mostly grass and mules tail and mullen, not much that 's even
            > > > edible.
            > > >
            > > > What vegetables and other perrenials would you recommend plannting
            > > > to make this space more edible.
            > > >
            > > > I'm trying to decide wether I want to put jerusam artichokes there
            > > or
            > > > not, i have some here in a planter, but they're wild, and not
            > > improved
            > > > so the tubers are really small..., and they're invasive,...
            > > >
            > > > and what can I do to make the wild raspberries more productive...
            > > they
            > > > only have one or 2 berries per bush....
            > > >
            > > > Jeff
            > > >
            > > Jeff,
            > >
            > > it would help to know where the lake country is - what zone? If
            > > there are trees around, collect the leaves and use as mulch, or pile
            > > them up this year and use the compost next year. How shady is the
            > > spot? Some vegies can take more shade than others. have the
            > > raspberries ever been pruned or cut back?
            > >
            > > anthony NH zone 5
            > >
            >
          • garden03048
            ... the ... them to the ground in late winter. I have domestic everbearers that I cut down to three feet or so. I also remove dead canes. This I do in
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 16, 2007
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              --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <shultonus@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > I live in zone 4 borderline to zone 3 mn/nd
              > THe other primary weed in question
              > is also known as horseweed aka Erigeron canadensis
              >
              > It gets sun from about 10 am until just about dusk.
              > It is close to swamp also, during spring water table is generally
              > within a foot of the surface....
              >
              > The raspberries are wild, never been cut back,
              > but have competition from poison ivy, sumac and dogwood,,,...
              > I'm discouraging the ivy, encouraging the sumac, and nuetral about
              the
              > dogwood...
              >
              > the rasberries are only in direct sun 4-6 hours a day...
              > I know the good properties of mullein so I don't mind it,
              > but it doesn't get me fed.. lol... i keep thinking someday
              > I"ll discover a use for the gazillion seeds each plant produces...
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Maybe you should try cutting back the raspberries. Some people cut
              them to the ground in late winter. I have 'domestic' everbearers
              that I cut down to three feet or so. I also remove dead canes. This
              I do in late winter or early spring. Seems to help a lot.

              anthony NH zone 5
              >
            • Gloria C. Baikauskas
              Jeff, did you know that goats will eat the poison ivy with no ill effects to them? Many people use goats to eradicate, or control poison ivy. Gloria, Texas
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 17, 2007
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                Jeff, did you know that goats will eat the poison ivy with no ill
                effects to them? Many people use goats to eradicate, or control
                poison ivy.

                Gloria, Texas

                --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <shultonus@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > I live in zone 4 borderline to zone 3 mn/nd
                > THe other primary weed in question
                > is also known as horseweed aka Erigeron canadensis
                >
                > It gets sun from about 10 am until just about dusk.
                > It is close to swamp also, during spring water table is generally
                > within a foot of the surface....
                >
                > The raspberries are wild, never been cut back,
                > but have competition from poison ivy, sumac and dogwood,,,...
                > I'm discouraging the ivy, encouraging the sumac, and nuetral about
                the
                > dogwood...
                >
                > the rasberries are only in direct sun 4-6 hours a day...
                > I know the good properties of mullein so I don't mind it,
                > but it doesn't get me fed.. lol... i keep thinking someday
                > I"ll discover a use for the gazillion seeds each plant produces...
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "debhlv" <debhlv@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I have never seen nor heard of Jerusalem Artichoke being invasive.
                > Is it, in your area? Yo, I
                > > love the stuff, and wish it grew here with more abundance!! Love
                to
                > serve up that nice
                > > black stuff to unsuspecting folk, and have them fall in love! <G>
                > >
                > > That Mullein, btw, is some of the best medicine you can have for
                > those who do hard work
                > > for a living; like homestead/farmer types. It is one of the
                finest
                > herbs for helping back
                > > troubles, joint troubles, and is also (most folk know of these
                > applications) for respiratory
                > > problems. Not "food", but is such a gentle, effective, and
                > all-purpose healing and useful
                > > herb, I'd certainly think twice before dismissing it. It also is
                a
                > great plant for opening up
                > > hardpan and other depleted soils- one reason it's growing where it
                > is now. So, if you don't
                > > want it where it's at, why not propagate it where you have some
                soil
                > that isn't doing so
                > > well?
                > >
                > > How about some asparagus? I remember this simply because this
                plant
                > was discussed
                > > elsewhere that I read this morn- but asparagus is some mighty fine
                > eats, and easy as an
                > > old log to care for.
                > >
                > > Am not certain what you mean by "mules tail" do you by any chance
                > know the botanical
                > > name for it, or have/have links to pics of it?
                > >
                > > If you can grow the egyptians, you can grow some fine garlic,
                too.
                > >
                > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "garden03048" <apdirusso@>
                > wrote:
                > > >
                > > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <shultonus@>
                wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > So I have this weekend spot in lake country that I go to in
                the
                > > > summer.
                > > > > It has rhubarb that doesn't do too good (too shaded, i think)
                > > > >
                > > > > I put some egyptian onoins there and they love it,
                > > > > but its an old (very sandy) strawberry patch, that is
                bassically
                > > > just
                > > > > weeds. mostly grass and mules tail and mullen, not much
                that 's even
                > > > > edible.
                > > > >
                > > > > What vegetables and other perrenials would you recommend
                plannting
                > > > > to make this space more edible.
                > > > >
                > > > > I'm trying to decide wether I want to put jerusam artichokes
                there
                > > > or
                > > > > not, i have some here in a planter, but they're wild, and not
                > > > improved
                > > > > so the tubers are really small..., and they're invasive,...
                > > > >
                > > > > and what can I do to make the wild raspberries more
                productive...
                > > > they
                > > > > only have one or 2 berries per bush....
                > > > >
                > > > > Jeff
                > > > >
                > > > Jeff,
                > > >
                > > > it would help to know where the lake country is - what zone?
                If
                > > > there are trees around, collect the leaves and use as mulch, or
                pile
                > > > them up this year and use the compost next year. How shady is
                the
                > > > spot? Some vegies can take more shade than others. have the
                > > > raspberries ever been pruned or cut back?
                > > >
                > > > anthony NH zone 5
                > > >
                > >
                >
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