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Re: Success Stories for Kikoricco

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  • Bart
    I agree wholeheartedly that this is the real issue of natural farming, and that in natural farming yield is not a goal - in a sense, there is no goal. Thank
    Message 1 of 27 , Feb 4, 2007
      I agree wholeheartedly that this is the real issue of natural farming,
      and that in natural farming yield is not a goal - in a sense, there is
      no goal. Thank you for pointing this out.

      However, let's be careful not to get trapped in Nothingness (which is
      one of the diseases of zen). If my industrial farmer neighbour comes
      to me and tells me, "hey, did you see the sun came up in the west this
      morning", I will tell him that this is not true, i.e. that this is not
      the right way to use these words. I know there is really neither east
      nor west, that these are concepts or illusions, and that the sun
      (another concept) doesn't care, and so on. However, if you open your
      mouth and use words, you should use them correctly.
      In the same way, if he comes to me and tells me "you and your natural
      farming, your yield is pitifull", I think it is important not to let
      ourselves be trapped in his incorrect (selective) use of the term
      "yield", only referring to weight/volume and making abstraction of
      many other important factors.
      Or we can just smile to him of course, but I for one know that if my
      smile doesn't come profoundly from the heart, I better argue :)

      This "industrial high yield"-lie is a stick behind the door with which
      organic producers/consumers/sellers are often beaten on the head -
      with their own full cooperation, choosing to go along with the narrow
      weight/volume-perspective and not finding an adequate response.

      But again, I do think it is very iportant to remember, time after
      time, that he real issue in natural farming is doing nothing.

      Bart

      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie Nicol" <jamienicol@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Dear All, in an attempt to broaden the discussion of 'success' and
      to avoid falling into 'esoteric' chatter, I thought some words of
      Fukuoka would be pragmatic:
      >
      > " To achieve a humanity and a society founded on non-action, man
      must look back over everything he has done and rid himself one by one
      of the false visions and concepts that permeate him and his society.
      This is what the 'do-nothing' movement is all about. Natural Farming
      can be seen as one branch of this movement. Human knowledge and effort
      expand and grow increasingly complex and wasteful without limit. We
      need to halt this expansion, to converge, simplify, and reduce our
      knowledge and effort. This is in keeping with the laws of nature.
      Natural Farming is more than just a revolution in agricultural
      techniques. It is the practical foundation of a spiritual movement, of
      a revolution to change the way we live."
      >
      > Obviously, the tenor of these words seems to suggest that NF and
      'success' might not be to do with yield, qualitative or quantitative.
      >
      > Jamie
      > Souscayrous
      >
    • Andrew E Fister
      The only time an argument exists between natural farming and conventional farming is when I am having it in my mind. If I am arguing (making one view good and
      Message 2 of 27 , Feb 4, 2007
        The only time an argument exists between natural farming and conventional
        farming is when I am having it in my mind. If I am arguing (making one
        view good and another view wrong) that's when I get trapped in the
        illusion of concepts. If I make a distinction between "nothingness" and
        "somethingness" as if they are states of mind I could be trapped in, I am
        also trapped. Once I start having this petty argument with my neighbor, I
        am indeed trapped. Unless of course I also know the trap is an illusion,
        in which case I can play and be in love with my conventional farming
        neighbor.

        If natural farming is about how "to do" and how "not to do" then I am not
        doing it and not - not doing it.

        Andrew Fister
        Wandafar Sanctuary
        Glasgow, KY

        b 2007 08:53:16 -0000 "Bart" <bartovan@...> writes:
        I agree wholeheartedly that this is the real issue of natural farming,
        and that in natural farming yield is not a goal - in a sense, there is
        no goal. Thank you for pointing this out.

        However, let's be careful not to get trapped in Nothingness (which is
        one of the diseases of zen). If my industrial farmer neighbour comes
        to me and tells me, "hey, did you see the sun came up in the west this
        morning", I will tell him that this is not true, i.e. that this is not
        the right way to use these words. I know there is really neither east
        nor west, that these are concepts or illusions, and that the sun
        (another concept) doesn't care, and so on. However, if you open your
        mouth and use words, you should use them correctly.
        In the same way, if he comes to me and tells me "you and your natural
        farming, your yield is pitifull", I think it is important not to let
        ourselves be trapped in his incorrect (selective) use of the term
        "yield", only referring to weight/volume and making abstraction of
        many other important factors.
        Or we can just smile to him of course, but I for one know that if my
        smile doesn't come profoundly from the heart, I better argue :)

        This "industrial high yield"-lie is a stick behind the door with which
        organic producers/consumers/sellers are often beaten on the head -
        with their own full cooperation, choosing to go along with the narrow
        weight/volume-perspective and not finding an adequate response.

        But again, I do think it is very iportant to remember, time after
        time, that he real issue in natural farming is doing nothing.

        Bart

        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie Nicol" <jamienicol@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Dear All, in an attempt to broaden the discussion of 'success' and
        to avoid falling into 'esoteric' chatter, I thought some words of
        Fukuoka would be pragmatic:
        >
        > " To achieve a humanity and a society founded on non-action, man
        must look back over everything he has done and rid himself one by one
        of the false visions and concepts that permeate him and his society.
        This is what the 'do-nothing' movement is all about. Natural Farming
        can be seen as one branch of this movement. Human knowledge and effort
        expand and grow increasingly complex and wasteful without limit. We
        need to halt this expansion, to converge, simplify, and reduce our
        knowledge and effort. This is in keeping with the laws of nature.
        Natural Farming is more than just a revolution in agricultural
        techniques. It is the practical foundation of a spiritual movement, of
        a revolution to change the way we live."
        >
        > Obviously, the tenor of these words seems to suggest that NF and
        'success' might not be to do with yield, qualitative or quantitative.
        >
        > Jamie
        > Souscayrous
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • rajuktitus
        Dear Charie, This is working for me i opened this page send by you write mail to group fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com. Thanks Raju
        Message 3 of 27 , Dec 17, 2008
          Dear Charie,
          This is working for me i opened this page send by you write mail to
          group
          fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com.
          Thanks
          Raju
        • grannis04
          Greetings from Maine. I am a new member to this site having arrived here from the fukuoka web site. I have been experimenting with natural farming/ gardening
          Message 4 of 27 , Jan 13, 2009
            Greetings from Maine. I am a new member to this site having arrived
            here from the fukuoka web site. I have been experimenting with natural
            farming/ gardening for about three years. I have been an organic
            gardener for forty years and now I am starting over and I'm completely
            amazed! why did I not see this before. It is the Mahayana aspect of
            natural farming that rings true to me. Last season we grew a corn crop
            "Abenaki", a flint type from native american origin, of course. With
            the high fuel prices last spring I said to myself, "grow a high input
            crop such as corn and do it without fossil fuel input". I planted in
            an orchard that was mixed grasses, clover, etc. I close cut with a
            hand sythe and then covered rows with mulch in preparation for
            planting. After two weeks I pulled back the mulch and pressed corn
            seed ( saved from previous years crop) on to the soil. I covered the
            seed with a light cover,Half inch, of finished compost. after
            germination I applied cut grasses from the paths to the plants.
            Thinned to one foot spacing then I top dressed lightly with chicken
            litter and grass cuttings, this was done about three times during the
            growing season. Every time I looked at my corn I would say," You guys
            are A-Maize-ing!". The end of the story is that we are eating our own
            cornbread made from the corn. The corn produced approx. 25 lbs. from
            approx. 150' of row space. My next project is to see if I can produce
            enough corn to supply my family and my chickens.
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