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Re: SuCcess Stories for KikoriCco

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  • biggly boop pongy pig
    I would agree that we should consider yields rather in terms of minerals, vitamins and general nutritional value per suare meter, instead of volume and weight.
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 2, 2007
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      I would agree that we should consider yields rather in terms of minerals, vitamins
      and general nutritional value per suare meter, instead of volume and
      weight. I am currently a horticulture student. In production no one cares about nutrition it is only about weight and that is usually achieved by trying to pump the product full of water as water is heavy. They really try to get that fine line of as much water as possible, but still make it taste good enough for people will buy it. I think the population would really be shocked to find out how much the food industry doesn't care about nutritional value. Also I know too that a lot of times chemical farmers get better yields but actually have more damaged product so in the end you might be getting 80% of your neighbours yield but in terms of sellable produce getting the same yield and better nutritional value!

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    • Andrew E Fister
      Well I have another perspective on success and failure - nature doesn t succeed or fail! Failure and success are human concepts, not nature s. One may employ
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 2, 2007
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        Well I have another perspective on success and failure - nature doesn't
        succeed or fail! Failure and success are human concepts, not nature's.
        One may employ various methods called "natural" but does that make one a
        "natural farmer"? On a semi-related humorous note: The Taoist master
        Chuang Tzu once had a dream that he was a butterfly. He lived the life of
        a butterfly, gathering nectar and flying in an insect's world. Suddenly,
        he awoke and found himself laying in bed, a person. But then he thought
        to himself, "Was I before a man who dreamt about being a butterfly, or am
        I now a butterfly who dreams about being a man?" I find that if "I" and
        nature are one, I have to laugh at the futility of my seriousness in
        striving after my concept of success or avoiding the disappointment in
        failure....afterall, I'm just dreaming.

        Andrew Fister
        Wandafar Sanctuary
        Glasgow, KY

        On Fri, 2 Feb 2007 10:16:52 -0800 (PST) biggly boop pongy pig
        <bigglybooppongypig@...> writes:
        I would agree that we should consider yields rather in terms of minerals,
        vitamins
        and general nutritional value per suare meter, instead of volume and
        weight. I am currently a horticulture student. In production no one cares
        about nutrition it is only about weight and that is usually achieved by
        trying to pump the product full of water as water is heavy. They really
        try to get that fine line of as much water as possible, but still make it
        taste good enough for people will buy it. I think the population would
        really be shocked to find out how much the food industry doesn't care
        about nutritional value. Also I know too that a lot of times chemical
        farmers get better yields but actually have more damaged product so in
        the end you might be getting 80% of your neighbours yield but in terms of
        sellable produce getting the same yield and better nutritional value!

        ---------------------------------
        Want to start your own business? Learn how on Yahoo! Small Business.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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