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Re: [fukuoka_farming] nitrogen works & on pests

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  • emilia
    hi robert, do u know if the NFTA still exists somewhere? years ago they used to be in hawaii, i really would like to know of their work again, they also had
    Message 1 of 3 , May 16, 2002
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      hi robert,
      do u know if the NFTA still exists somewhere? years ago they used to be in
      hawaii, i really would like to know of their work again, they also had
      excellent publications, info, on nitrogen fixing plants.
      thanks!
      about pests, etc. robin, are u totally new to organic agriculture, or
      only to the natural one?
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Robert Monie" <bobm20001@...>
      To: <Fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, May 11, 2002 12:02 AM
      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] More on nitrogen-fixing plants for temperate
      climates


      > Martin Crawford, a prolific author on agroforestry and
      > director of the Agroforestry Research Trust (founded
      > by James Lovelock, co-author of the "Gaia hypothesis)
      > in England has written an 87-page booklet (ISBN
      > 1-874275-25-4) called "Nitrogen-Fixing Plants for
      > Temperate Climates." The advertisment for the booklet
      > notes that "most people only know of the legumes as
      > nitrogen fixers; however, there are several other
      > plant groups which do so, notably the so-called
      > actinorhizal plants (including alders, Elaeagnus, sea
      > buckthorn), which are mostly of temperate origin and
      > better suited to cool temperate climates." Crawford's
      > book on temperate climate nitrogen fixers is dated
      > 1995 and is advertised on the Agroforestry Research
      > Trust website:
      > http://www.agroforestry.co.uk
      >
      > Nitrogen-fixing can be a very recondite and forbidding
      > subject when presented by the usual gatherings of soil
      > specialists and microbiologists. I am not aware of
      > many "chatty" and user-friendly presentations of this
      > subject in print, so Crawford's could prove welcome.
      >
      > Here in New Orleans, the Louisiana Nursery and
      > Landscape Association and the Louisiana Cooperative
      > Extension Service have issued "Tree Ratings for the
      > New Orleans Area." In this report, they relegate two
      > popular nitrogen-fixing trees--the Mimosa (Albizzia
      > julibrissin) and the Black Locust (Robinia
      > pseudoacacia) to the very bottom of the list with a
      > "Rating 4 (Poor)" category. In their experience,
      > these two trees are problematic in New Orleans for one
      > or more of the following 5 reasons: poor life
      > expectancy, poor aesthetic qualities, susceptibility
      > to insect and disease problems, lack of adaptability
      > to climate and urban conditions, and amount of
      > maintenance required. They are no more specific than
      > this, but they
      > dislike these two trees for our ecology and climate.
      >
      > I'm wondering if we would do better in Southern
      > Louisiana with shrub-like nitrogen-fixing plants
      > rather than nitrogen-fixing trees. The Amorpha
      > fruitcosa or "false indigo" is a likely prospect.
      >
      > Any comments would be appreciated.
      >
      >
      >
      > __________________________________________________
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      > Yahoo! Shopping - Mother's Day is May 12th!
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      >
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      >
      >
    • Robert Monie
      Hello Emilia, The NFTA (Nitrogen Fixing Tree Association) has changed its name to FACT Net (Forest, Farm, and Community Tree Network) and has moved to the
      Message 2 of 3 , May 16, 2002
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        Hello Emilia,
        The NFTA (Nitrogen Fixing Tree Association) has changed its name to "FACT Net" (Forest, Farm, and Community Tree Network) and has moved to the following addresses:
        38 Winrock Drive, Morrilton, Arkansas 72110-9370, USA.
        Telephone: 501-727-5435 Fax: 501-727-5417
        email: forestry@...
        URL: http://www.winrock.org/forestry/factnet.htm
        AgroForester at P.O. Box 428, Holualoa, Hawaii 96725 still links to them through
        http://www.agroforester.com
        Agroforester has a neat little 12-page paper that you can download called "Nitrogen Fixing Tree Start-Up Guide" by Craig Elevitch and Kim Wilkinson from the website listed just above.
        Personally, though, I find the research on nitrogen-fixing trees and shrubs now going on in Great Britain more exciting. NFTA tends to downplay nitrogen-fixers in temperate and sub-tropic climates. By contrast, the http://www.agroforestry.co.uk site has a wealth of booklets by Martin Crawford that bring to forest farming and permaculture a degree of detail I have not seen before, and does not ignore temperate climates. The fact that a pioneering biologist like James Lovelock would help underwrite this project suggests that "self-fertility" in farming may soon get the respect it deserves from serious scientists
        Even more adventurous is the great sprawling website called "Plants for a Future: A Resource Centre for Edible and Other Useful Plants." One way to log on (there seem to be many) is
        http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/pfaf/vegorg.html
        They have a database that allows the reader to pull up many nitrogen-fixing plants ranked according to their "usefulness" from 0 (useless) to 5 (excellent). Among the 5's are some plants we don't often hear much about. "Hog peanut," for instance. Hog peanut (amphicarpaea bracteata) is a perrenial legume that climbs to 1.5 meters. It can grow in sandy, loamy or clayey soils and it does well in full shade or semi-shade.
        Anyone in the United States who wants to try Hog peanuts can get them from
        Wildtype, 900 North Every Road, Mason, MI 48854. email wildtype@...
        Other top-ranked plants are the scrubby Elaeagnus and Hippophae families. The Elaeagnus x ebbingei is a natural windbrake that thrives even in gale-force storms. It grows in either sun or shade and produces sour fruit rich in vitamins and currently under lab study as a powerful anti-cancer agent. The Hippophae group (popularly called "Buckthorns") possess similarly endearing qualities.
        In many parts of the world, including the United States, these scrubby nitrogen-fixers may be a better "investment" than some of the more glamorous, tall nitrogen-fixing trees.
        Also, especially in dry and desert-like climates, we should not overlook the Prosopsis (Mesquite) for its hardiness and nitrogen-fixing prowess.
        Here in New Orleans, many of us tried the beautiful Mimosa tree as a nitrogen fixer, but large numbers of Mimosas were wiped out by viral infections, and horticulturalists down here have taken the Mimosa off the recommended list of trees to be used for any kind of New Orleans landscape. The Black locus (Robinia pseudoacacia), which works so well in many locations also tends to flop down here. For a report on New Orleans tree ratings, see
        http://members.aol.com/JYEX2/garden_louisiana_trees.htm
        Best Wishes
        emilia <emhaz@...> wrote: hi robert,
        do u know if the NFTA still exists somewhere? years ago they used to be in
        hawaii, i really would like to know of their work again, they also had
        excellent publications, info, on nitrogen fixing plants.
        thanks!
        about pests, etc. robin, are u totally new to organic agriculture, or
        only to the natural one?
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Robert Monie" <bobm20001@...>
        To: <Fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, May 11, 2002 12:02 AM
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] More on nitrogen-fixing plants for temperate
        climates


        > Martin Crawford, a prolific author on agroforestry and
        > director of the Agroforestry Research Trust (founded
        > by James Lovelock, co-author of the "Gaia hypothesis)
        > in England has written an 87-page booklet (ISBN
        > 1-874275-25-4) called "Nitrogen-Fixing Plants for
        > Temperate Climates." The advertisment for the booklet
        > notes that "most people only know of the legumes as
        > nitrogen fixers; however, there are several other
        > plant groups which do so, notably the so-called
        > actinorhizal plants (including alders, Elaeagnus, sea
        > buckthorn), which are mostly of temperate origin and
        > better suited to cool temperate climates." Crawford's
        > book on temperate climate nitrogen fixers is dated
        > 1995 and is advertised on the Agroforestry Research
        > Trust website:
        > http://www.agroforestry.co.uk
        >
        > Nitrogen-fixing can be a very recondite and forbidding
        > subject when presented by the usual gatherings of soil
        > specialists and microbiologists. I am not aware of
        > many "chatty" and user-friendly presentations of this
        > subject in print, so Crawford's could prove welcome.
        >
        > Here in New Orleans, the Louisiana Nursery and
        > Landscape Association and the Louisiana Cooperative
        > Extension Service have issued "Tree Ratings for the
        > New Orleans Area." In this report, they relegate two
        > popular nitrogen-fixing trees--the Mimosa (Albizzia
        > julibrissin) and the Black Locust (Robinia
        > pseudoacacia) to the very bottom of the list with a
        > "Rating 4 (Poor)" category. In their experience,
        > these two trees are problematic in New Orleans for one
        > or more of the following 5 reasons: poor life
        > expectancy, poor aesthetic qualities, susceptibility
        > to insect and disease problems, lack of adaptability
        > to climate and urban conditions, and amount of
        > maintenance required. They are no more specific than
        > this, but they
        > dislike these two trees for our ecology and climate.
        >
        > I'm wondering if we would do better in Southern
        > Louisiana with shrub-like nitrogen-fixing plants
        > rather than nitrogen-fixing trees. The Amorpha
        > fruitcosa or "false indigo" is a likely prospect.
        >
        > Any comments would be appreciated.
        >
        >
        >
        > __________________________________________________
        > Do You Yahoo!?
        > Yahoo! Shopping - Mother's Day is May 12th!
        > http://shopping.yahoo.com
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >


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      • RobinFern´┐Żndez-Medina
        Hi Emilia and all, First of all sorry to everyone for forwarding that last heard it on the news Email . I checked the wrong box. My pardons for distributing
        Message 3 of 3 , May 17, 2002
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          Hi Emilia and all,
          First of all sorry to everyone for forwarding that last "heard it on the news Email". I checked the wrong box. My pardons for distributing it.
          Thanks for your response. I guess two years is quite new to organic or natural farming. I have used several different techniques in pest control, high alkali soaps, copper, interplanting rosemary and lavender, as well as offering sacrificial plants to attract some of the most pesky. I noticed it takes a time for things to balance out. I use beer in a cup to trap slugs, or tiles that they can get under for cool. These are some techniques I have learnt from reading and others and was interested in hearing of others. This year I have seen ladybugs return in numbers larger than last year as well as more butterflies which could be good or bad.
          emilia <emhaz@...> wrote: hi robert,
          do u know if the NFTA still exists somewhere? years ago they used to be in
          hawaii, i really would like to know of their work again, they also had
          excellent publications, info, on nitrogen fixing plants.
          thanks!
          about pests, etc. robin, are u totally new to organic agriculture, or
          only to the natural one?
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Robert Monie" <bobm20001@...>
          To: <Fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, May 11, 2002 12:02 AM
          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] More on nitrogen-fixing plants for temperate
          climates


          > Martin Crawford, a prolific author on agroforestry and
          > director of the Agroforestry Research Trust (founded
          > by James Lovelock, co-author of the "Gaia hypothesis)
          > in England has written an 87-page booklet (ISBN
          > 1-874275-25-4) called "Nitrogen-Fixing Plants for
          > Temperate Climates." The advertisment for the booklet
          > notes that "most people only know of the legumes as
          > nitrogen fixers; however, there are several other
          > plant groups which do so, notably the so-called
          > actinorhizal plants (including alders, Elaeagnus, sea
          > buckthorn), which are mostly of temperate origin and
          > better suited to cool temperate climates." Crawford's
          > book on temperate climate nitrogen fixers is dated
          > 1995 and is advertised on the Agroforestry Research
          > Trust website:
          > http://www.agroforestry.co.uk
          >
          > Nitrogen-fixing can be a very recondite and forbidding
          > subject when presented by the usual gatherings of soil
          > specialists and microbiologists. I am not aware of
          > many "chatty" and user-friendly presentations of this
          > subject in print, so Crawford's could prove welcome.
          >
          > Here in New Orleans, the Louisiana Nursery and
          > Landscape Association and the Louisiana Cooperative
          > Extension Service have issued "Tree Ratings for the
          > New Orleans Area." In this report, they relegate two
          > popular nitrogen-fixing trees--the Mimosa (Albizzia
          > julibrissin) and the Black Locust (Robinia
          > pseudoacacia) to the very bottom of the list with a
          > "Rating 4 (Poor)" category. In their experience,
          > these two trees are problematic in New Orleans for one
          > or more of the following 5 reasons: poor life
          > expectancy, poor aesthetic qualities, susceptibility
          > to insect and disease problems, lack of adaptability
          > to climate and urban conditions, and amount of
          > maintenance required. They are no more specific than
          > this, but they
          > dislike these two trees for our ecology and climate.
          >
          > I'm wondering if we would do better in Southern
          > Louisiana with shrub-like nitrogen-fixing plants
          > rather than nitrogen-fixing trees. The Amorpha
          > fruitcosa or "false indigo" is a likely prospect.
          >
          > Any comments would be appreciated.
          >
          >
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          > Do You Yahoo!?
          > Yahoo! Shopping - Mother's Day is May 12th!
          > http://shopping.yahoo.com
          >
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >


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          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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