Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

anyone here familiar with allelotropes/allelopathic properties?

Expand Messages
  • jimgerhold
    Hello everyone, In my research of greening already green pastures with crops...I m a little concerned with allelopathic properties of existing grasses like
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 14, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello everyone,
      In my research of greening already green pastures with crops...I'm a
      little concerned with allelopathic properties of existing grasses
      like fescue. I've read about rye:

      (It has been widely reported that residues of fall-planted, spring-
      killed rye reduces total weed biomass by 60% to 95% when compared to
      controls with no residue. Rye residue which remains at the soil
      surface can potentially modify the physical and chemical environment
      during seed germination and plant growth.)

      Are these substances usually minimized during periods of rain when
      my seedballs will be sprouting? I imagine the seedballs will allow
      the spouting seeds to get off to a good start since they lay above
      the ground. I imagine it'll be easier the second season around after
      there has been straw from these planted crops to leave their own
      allelopathic residues behind. Am I just worrying too much?

      My only experience with allelotropes is with aquatic plants that I've
      grown in fresh water aquariums...it boggled the mind how I could only
      have one type of grass grow well depending on which one was well
      established first in any one aquarium. However...if I did frequent
      water changes to "water down" these allelotropes...I could
      successfully grow these competing species together.

      Any advice would be gladly appreciated...especially if it applies to
      establishing crops in pasture in(US) zones 7-8, North Carolina. I'm
      completely against using any form of chemicals such as glyphosate,
      etc. Thanks!

      James
    • JSENT
      Studied and used winter rye last season. Will be trying winter rye again ahead of tomato, pepper and eggplant transplants for allelopathic weed suppression.
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 16, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Studied and used winter rye last season. Will be trying winter rye again ahead of tomato, pepper and eggplant transplants for allelopathic weed suppression.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • poppyandeve
        ... tomato, pepper and eggplant transplants for allelopathic weed suppression. ... Have a word with Pankaj Oudhia in India. He has worked a lot with this -
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 17, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, JSENT <wegrow4@...> wrote:
          >
          > Studied and used winter rye last season. Will be trying winter rye again ahead of
          tomato, pepper and eggplant transplants for allelopathic weed suppression.
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >

          Have a word with Pankaj Oudhia in India. He has worked a lot with this - and with
          homeopathy for plants etc. Worth dropping in at - for example - http://botanical.com/
          site/column_poudhia/publish/journal.cgi?folder=journal&next=outline
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.