Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [fukuoka_farming] Started reading Natural Farming BOOK

Expand Messages
  • Frank Stancato
    Ingrid Bauer / Jean-Claude, my father taught me a long time ago to put any organic matter from the house directly into the soil. At times this was a challenge,
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 18, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Ingrid Bauer / Jean-Claude, my father taught me a long time ago to put any
      organic matter from the house directly into the soil. At times this was a
      challenge, especially if it was hot or the ground was frozen, but the
      results were always fantastic.



      We always seemed to have the happiest garden in the area. Whether it was
      from the direct addition of organics to it or the fact that dad made wine
      and apple jack, putting all of the material into the garden (he did till the
      garden that time of year).



      He also went so far as to aerate the lawn, the plugs went into the mulch
      pile that was from the leaves and manure he would have delivered, always in
      the summer and always at the bottom of the driveway so I would have
      something to do. And the mature mulch would be racked over the lawn, filling
      the plug wholes.



      Frank



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • kikoricco
      Thanks everyone! It seems every person who answers and I understand a little bit more about natural farming. It really seems too good to be true. I guess I was
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 18, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks everyone! It seems every person who answers and I understand a
        little bit more about natural farming. It really seems too good to be
        true. I guess I was thrown off by the simplicity of it all. I cant
        wait to start.
      • Allan Balliett
        ... Kiko - Who signed the letter from Santa Cruz? WHo was it from? I assume everyone knows that the Alan Chadwick started the organic farming movement at
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 18, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          >And thats what they answered. Thanks for reading this whole post and
          >please answer a question or two.
          >thank you, Kiko

          Kiko - Who "signed" the letter from Santa Cruz? WHo was it from? I
          assume everyone knows that the Alan Chadwick started the organic
          farming movement at Santa Cruz back in the 70's. Deep hand tillage
          (double digging) was the key to his highly productive farming methods.

          Thanks for sharing this letter. For those who are critical of the
          Santa Cruz comments, I would point out that they have continued to
          evolve their methodology according to their observations of the piece
          of land that they actually husband.

          -Allan
        • Robert Monie
          Alan Chadwick s methods are charmingly (though I cannot verify how accurately) presented in a little book by Tom Cuthbertson, Alan Chadwick s Enchanted
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 18, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Alan Chadwick's methods are charmingly (though I cannot verify how accurately) presented in a little book by Tom Cuthbertson, "Alan Chadwick's Enchanted Garden," published in 1978 by the Institute for Man and Nature. Used copies are for sale on abebooks.com.

            Chadwick worked mostly in raised beds that were small enough for him to water and tend manually, not the larger experimental farm now run at Santa Cruz. Though he did not till, he did poke around in the soil with a triangular blade to loosen the compaction near the surface. (He freely admitted that watering from above often compacts the soil.) He was also both fussy and creative in dealing with "weeds." He transplanted some weeds, composted some, and thinned out others. He transplanted sow thistles and liked the tase of sonchus, allowed senecio and chicory to grow largely undisturbed but viewed convolvulus with great suspicion. People used to say that he "put on" his raised bed plant garden the same way that a drama director would stage a Shakespearian play (Chadwick was himself a classical actor).

            Chadwick's influence is felt today mostly though John Jeavons, who emulated him in practicing biointensive gardening

            Bob Monie
            New Orleans




            Allan Balliett <aballiett@...> wrote:
            >And thats what they answered. Thanks for reading this whole post and
            >please answer a question or two.
            >thank you, Kiko

            Kiko - Who "signed" the letter from Santa Cruz? WHo was it from? I
            assume everyone knows that the Alan Chadwick started the organic
            farming movement at Santa Cruz back in the 70's. Deep hand tillage
            (double digging) was the key to his highly productive farming methods.

            Thanks for sharing this letter. For those who are critical of the
            Santa Cruz comments, I would point out that they have continued to
            evolve their methodology according to their observations of the piece
            of land that they actually husband.

            -Allan





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • kikoricco
            The person who signed the letter was Jim Leap Farm Manager Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems University of California ... accurately)
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 18, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              The person who signed the letter was Jim Leap
              Farm Manager
              Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems
              University of California





              --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Robert Monie <bobm20001@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Alan Chadwick's methods are charmingly (though I cannot verify how
              accurately) presented in a little book by Tom Cuthbertson, "Alan
              Chadwick's Enchanted Garden," published in 1978 by the Institute for
              Man and Nature. Used copies are for sale on abebooks.com.
              >
              > Chadwick worked mostly in raised beds that were small enough for
              him to water and tend manually, not the larger experimental farm now
              run at Santa Cruz. Though he did not till, he did poke around in the
              soil with a triangular blade to loosen the compaction near the
              surface. (He freely admitted that watering from above often compacts
              the soil.) He was also both fussy and creative in dealing with
              "weeds." He transplanted some weeds, composted some, and thinned out
              others. He transplanted sow thistles and liked the tase of sonchus,
              allowed senecio and chicory to grow largely undisturbed but viewed
              convolvulus with great suspicion. People used to say that he "put on"
              his raised bed plant garden the same way that a drama director would
              stage a Shakespearian play (Chadwick was himself a classical actor).
              >
              > Chadwick's influence is felt today mostly though John Jeavons, who
              emulated him in practicing biointensive gardening
              >
              > Bob Monie
              > New Orleans
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Allan Balliett <aballiett@...> wrote:
              > >And thats what they answered. Thanks for reading this
              whole post and
              > >please answer a question or two.
              > >thank you, Kiko
              >
              > Kiko - Who "signed" the letter from Santa Cruz? WHo was it from? I
              > assume everyone knows that the Alan Chadwick started the organic
              > farming movement at Santa Cruz back in the 70's. Deep hand tillage
              > (double digging) was the key to his highly productive farming methods.
              >
              > Thanks for sharing this letter. For those who are critical of the
              > Santa Cruz comments, I would point out that they have continued to
              > evolve their methodology according to their observations of the piece
              > of land that they actually husband.
              >
              > -Allan
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Allan Balliett
              ... Another way of saying this is that Jeavons took Chadwick s intensive raised bed gardening methods, but stripped his garden of the spirituality that was so
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 18, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                >Chadwick's influence is felt today mostly though John Jeavons, who
                >emulated him in practicing biointensive gardening

                Another way of saying this is that Jeavons took Chadwick's intensive
                raised bed gardening methods, but stripped his garden of the
                spirituality that was so much part of Chadwick's legacy. -Allan
              • Tradingpost
                And Jeavons did much to popularize intensive beds, though a man named Peter Chan also put out a beautiful book on permanent raised bed growing, and Chan s work
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 18, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  And Jeavons did much to popularize intensive beds, though a man named Peter
                  Chan also put out a beautiful book on permanent raised bed growing, and
                  Chan's work was authentic, based on his heritage in Chinese village
                  gardening. Chan came from a career as professor of plant pathology in
                  China.

                  Better Vegetable Gardens the Chinese Way,
                  http://www.bookfinder.com/search/?ac=sl&st=sl&qi=SW2bEgW,VsMHiVGbl9GihnGf,Gg
                  _7758619146_2:2:7

                  paul tradingpost@...

                  Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes.
                  --Henry David Thoreau

                  *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

                  On 12/18/2006 at 8:00 PM Allan Balliett wrote:

                  >>Chadwick's influence is felt today mostly though John Jeavons, who
                  >>emulated him in practicing biointensive gardening
                  >
                  >Another way of saying this is that Jeavons took Chadwick's intensive
                  >raised bed gardening methods, but stripped his garden of the
                  >spirituality that was so much part of Chadwick's legacy. -Allan
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.