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Store Bought Seed vs Other Seed

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  • tykei2
    hi all, Im starting a small natural farm in a relatives back yard. Im going to try various techniques based on the Fukuoka method. I have no expectations
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 12, 2006
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      hi all,

      Im starting a small natural farm in a relatives back yard. Im going to
      try various techniques based on the Fukuoka method. I have no
      expectations except to learn and have fun.

      but I was wondering about seed? There are many seed types sold in
      stores, but Im not sure if those have been engineered or altered in
      some way? Most of the brands we have here are made by the Burpee
      brand. Is it OK to use this seed? (i.e.- will it be a strong fertile
      plant?) or if not, is there a place to get more natural seeds that are
      better?

      any help is appreciated, thanks!

      -Ty
    • Steve Gage
      ... Burpee seeds are likely to be hybrids, and thus you won t be able to gather seed from your crop to replant. I would highly recommend going with
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 12, 2006
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        tykei2 wrote:
        > hi all,
        >
        > Im starting a small natural farm in a relatives back yard. Im going to
        > try various techniques based on the Fukuoka method. I have no
        > expectations except to learn and have fun.
        >
        > but I was wondering about seed? There are many seed types sold in
        > stores, but Im not sure if those have been engineered or altered in
        > some way? Most of the brands we have here are made by the Burpee
        > brand. Is it OK to use this seed? (i.e.- will it be a strong fertile
        > plant?) or if not, is there a place to get more natural seeds that are
        > better?
        >
        > any help is appreciated, thanks!
        > -Ty
        >
        >
        >
        Burpee seeds are likely to be hybrids, and thus you won't be able to
        gather seed from your crop to replant. I would highly recommend going
        with open-pollinated varieties. There are plenty of excellent seed
        catalogs out there - try to find one nearby to where you will be
        growing. I am in New Hampshire, USA, and I use Fedco seeds
        (www.fedcoseeds.com). They are based in Maine, and have an excellent and
        comprehensive catalog of open-pollinated, heirloom, and organically
        produced seed that is appropriate for my region. But there are others...

        - Steve
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Tradingpost
        http://www.bountifulgardens.org/ http://www.seedstrust.com/ http://www.heirloomseeds.com/ http://www.appalachianseeds.com/ http://www.rareseeds.com/
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 12, 2006
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          http://www.bountifulgardens.org/
          http://www.seedstrust.com/
          http://www.heirloomseeds.com/
          http://www.appalachianseeds.com/
          http://www.rareseeds.com/
          http://www.seedswestgardenseeds.com/

          paul tradingpost@...

          *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

          On 11/12/2006 at 6:01 PM Steve Gage wrote:

          >tykei2 wrote:
          >> hi all,
          >>
          >> Im starting a small natural farm in a relatives back yard. Im going to
          >> try various techniques based on the Fukuoka method. I have no
          >> expectations except to learn and have fun.
          >>
          >> but I was wondering about seed? There are many seed types sold in
          >> stores, but Im not sure if those have been engineered or altered in
          >> some way? Most of the brands we have here are made by the Burpee
          >> brand. Is it OK to use this seed? (i.e.- will it be a strong fertile
          >> plant?) or if not, is there a place to get more natural seeds that are
          >> better?
          >>
          >> any help is appreciated, thanks!
          >> -Ty
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >Burpee seeds are likely to be hybrids, and thus you won't be able to
          >gather seed from your crop to replant. I would highly recommend going
          >with open-pollinated varieties. There are plenty of excellent seed
          >catalogs out there - try to find one nearby to where you will be
          >growing. I am in New Hampshire, USA, and I use Fedco seeds
          >(www.fedcoseeds.com). They are based in Maine, and have an excellent and
          >comprehensive catalog of open-pollinated, heirloom, and organically
          >produced seed that is appropriate for my region. But there are others...
          >
          >- Steve
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Yahoo! Groups Links
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
        • Forest Shomer
          Ty, If you are willing to order by mail, you have dozens of choices. See: http://homepage.tinet.ie/~merlyn/seedsaving.html Seed Saving Resources also:
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 13, 2006
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            Ty,

            If you are willing to order by mail, you have dozens of choices.

            See: http://homepage.tinet.ie/~merlyn/seedsaving.html
            "Seed Saving Resources"

            also: http://www.seedsavers.org/
            "Seed Savers Exchange"

            Assuming you are in the USA, there is probably a Whole Foods store
            somewhere nearby. They usually have a display rack with Seeds of
            Change, and sometimes, other labels that are non-hybrid in origin.

            Truly,

            Forest

            Inside Passage Seeds and Native Plant Services
            Forest Shomer, owner
            Port Townsend, WA, USA
            inspass@...
            http://www.insidepassageseeds.com



            >Sun Nov 12, 2006 2:52 pm (PST)
            >
            >hi all,
            >
            >Im starting a small natural farm in a relatives back yard. Im going to
            >try various techniques based on the Fukuoka method. I have no
            >expectations except to learn and have fun.
            >
            >but I was wondering about seed? There are many seed types sold in
            >stores, but Im not sure if those have been engineered or altered in
            >some way? Most of the brands we have here are made by the Burpee
            >brand. Is it OK to use this seed? (i.e.- will it be a strong fertile
            >plant?) or if not, is there a place to get more natural seeds that are
            >better?
            >
            >any help is appreciated, thanks!
            >
            >-Ty

            --


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Gloria C. Baikauskas
            I usually recommend two seed developers
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 13, 2006
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              I usually recommend two seed developers <who don't use GMO methods, but
              natural ones instead> who have been members of this list. George
              Stevens develops seeds in N. California. The URL for his website is
              http://www.synergyseeds.com

              The other seed developer is in Oregon, Tim Peters. His URL is

              http://www.pioneer-net.com/psr/index.html

              Gloria, Texas


              --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "tykei2" <tykei2@...> wrote:
              >
              > hi all,
              >
              > Im starting a small natural farm in a relatives back yard. Im going to
              > try various techniques based on the Fukuoka method. I have no
              > expectations except to learn and have fun.
              >
              > but I was wondering about seed? There are many seed types sold in
              > stores, but Im not sure if those have been engineered or altered in
              > some way? Most of the brands we have here are made by the Burpee
              > brand. Is it OK to use this seed? (i.e.- will it be a strong fertile
              > plant?) or if not, is there a place to get more natural seeds that are
              > better?
              >
              > any help is appreciated, thanks!
              >
              > -Ty
              >
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