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For those who have made seedballs using oak acorns

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  • iker_pleyber
    Hi, I want to make seedballs with oak acorns. At the moment, I have collected many acorns, cleaned them in a pan with water, dry them and excluded those with a
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 4, 2006
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      Hi,

      I want to make seedballs with oak acorns. At the moment, I have
      collected many acorns, cleaned them in a pan with water, dry them and
      excluded those with a hole. After that, some worms remained so I
      decided to keep acorns in the fridge, in order to prevent worms from
      eating them. Do you think this is a good idea ? I would like to know
      what is the best place to stock acorns, since I won't have time to make
      seedballs until at least one month.

      My english is not very good so forgive my mistakes. Thank you for your
      comprehension and for your help.
    • Sylvain Picker
      The oly trick I have seen about planting nuts and that probably apply to acorns is to plant them by groups of three (thinning the 3 seedlings to 1 after on or
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 5, 2006
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        The oly trick I have seen about planting nuts and that probably apply to
        acorns is to plant them by groups of three (thinning the 3 seedlings to 1
        after on or two seasons) is to put a showel of fresh manure on top of the
        fall planted nut. This is done to protect the nut from squirrels. The manure
        decompose over the winter.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jeff
        HI Iker, While I don t have experience with seedballs using acorns, I have had much sucess with planting acorns directly. Depending on what type of oak you
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 6, 2006
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          HI Iker,

          While I don't have experience with seedballs using acorns,
          I have had much sucess with planting acorns directly.

          Depending on what type of oak you have, ... the treatment varies.
          According to my information, oaks from the Black/Red family must be
          stratified, while oaks from the white family do not. This does make
          sense in terms of the requirement to leach out some of the tanins in
          the Black/red family, but I'm not sure that white is completely free
          of the need for stratifying.

          There maybe scrub oaks that can stand drying out, the oaks around
          here atleast, cannot dry out or they lose they're fertility rapidly.
          They are meant to be buried by squirrels and the like immediately
          after falling to avoid this drying out.

          I store mine in the fridge in a bowl with a little bit of water
          about 1" (2cm). I roll it around to coat all the acorns every ten
          days or so.

          Acorns usually take a long time to sprout, as the water has to
          penetrate the outer shell and make it soft enough, and allow enough
          water for the acorn seed to germinate.

          Generally the first couple of weeks (2-3+) the acorn sends a tap
          root strait down (this is what gives oaks better drought protection
          than most other trees), This is the stage I like to plant them.
          After sprouting, before leaf out.
          There are two methods I've used for planting.
          The first is to spread them out, and cover with 2-4" of compost
          (leaf rich compost works better),
          the second involves using a stick or a dibble to punch a hole in the
          ground and dropping the acorn in that. then closing the hole up with
          the dibble.
          1"-2" is ideal planting depth.

          While I've never worked with seedballs for acorns, they present a
          couple of problems: the drying out, the lack of soil contact once
          the tap root breaks outside of the shell , this would leave the
          taproot vulnerable to sun, and drying out further.

          If you do go with seedballs, I would try a much larger variant,
          baseball size (3-4" diameter). Reduce the amount of clay, to just
          enough to hold the thing together.

          Good luck.

          Jeff
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