Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [fukuoka_farming] black locust & red clay

Expand Messages
  • Rex Teague
    ... Another very good website is: http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/pfaf/D_search.html There are US and Australian mirrors and you can search by uses. Three
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 21 1:56 PM
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      On 21 Apr 02, Robert Monie wrote:

      > A partial list of the world's nitrogen-fixing trees appears on the
      > following web site (from the University of Wisconsin Forestry
      > department, I believe):
      > http://treebiol.forest.wisc.edu/forestry415/TreeStructure/symbioses/NFTchar.htm

      Another very good website is:
      http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/pfaf/D_search.html
      There are US and Australian mirrors and you can search by uses.

      Three multi-purpose classics I've tried but they failed because of wet
      feet and note in parts of the world they are regarded as "noxious
      weeds":
      Chamaecytisus palmenis: Tagasaste or Tree lucerne
      Medicago arborea: Tree medic
      Teline monspessulana: Mountpelier broom

      I'm having better luck with an assortment of Alders (Alnus spp)
      particularly A. glutinosa.

      There are strong advocates of Robinia pseudoacacia and Paulownia
      tomentosa (or maybe it is P. elongata?) in New Zealand but they
      seem to be fussy and a lot of serious plantings have failed or are of
      indifferent performance... could be a lack of attention to root
      innoculants??

      The NZ native Sophora tetraptera (North Island Kowhai) is being
      pushed in some quarters as a multi-purpose farm tree ie nitrogen
      fixer (in the Leguminosaea family), timber, bee and bird nectar,
      attractive, stock proof, etc.

      Cheerio... Rex
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.