Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [fukuoka_farming] Morishima Acacia

Expand Messages
  • emilia
    hi finefroc, it seems that there is an spelling mistake & that it is actually the acacia mollissima , (Acacia mearnsii, de Wild), also known as acacia
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 17, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      hi finefroc,
      it seems that there is an spelling mistake & that it is actually the acacia
      "mollissima", (Acacia mearnsii, de Wild), also known as acacia decurrens or
      "black wattle", as it is with all true acacias it wont stand cold climate
      although it has more tolerence to cool winters than others & can even stand
      moderately mild frosts (-3°C), it needs neutral to acid soils & is not
      tolerant to alkaline or calcareous soils.
      rather than copying "literally" Fukuoka, try to find the nitrogen fixing
      trees that best corresponds to ur climatic & soil conditions...
      2 leguminous trees -so far- are known not to fix nitrogen: the Gleditschia
      triacanthos & Ceratonia siliqua edulis..
      best wishes! emilia

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "finefroc" <finefroc@...>
      To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, April 17, 2002 4:28 AM
      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Morishima Acacia


      > Does anybody know the Botanical name of the Morishma Acacia named in
      > THE ONE STRAW REVOLUTON?
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    • Jack Finefroc
      Wow! Thanks so much. Any opinion on the Black Locust as a nitrogen fixing substitute? Finefroc ... ADVERTISEMENT [Click Here!] ... [Non-text portions of this
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 17, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Wow! Thanks so much. Any opinion on the Black Locust as a nitrogen
        fixing substitute? Finefroc

        emilia wrote:

        > hi finefroc,
        > it seems that there is an spelling mistake & that it is actually the
        > acacia
        > "mollissima", (Acacia mearnsii, de Wild), also known as acacia
        > decurrens or
        > "black wattle", as it is with all true acacias it wont stand cold
        > climate
        > although it has more tolerence to cool winters than others & can even
        > stand
        > moderately mild frosts (-3°C), it needs neutral to acid soils & is not
        >
        > tolerant to alkaline or calcareous soils.
        > rather than copying "literally" Fukuoka, try to find the nitrogen
        > fixing
        > trees that best corresponds to ur climatic & soil conditions...
        > 2 leguminous trees -so far- are known not to fix nitrogen: the
        > Gleditschia
        > triacanthos & Ceratonia siliqua edulis..
        > best wishes! emilia
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "finefroc" <finefroc@...>
        > To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Wednesday, April 17, 2002 4:28 AM
        > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Morishima Acacia
        >
        >
        > > Does anybody know the Botanical name of the Morishma Acacia named in
        >
        > > THE ONE STRAW REVOLUTON?
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
        ADVERTISEMENT
        [Click Here!]

        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • barleymalt_spoon
        Gday from Tasmania. The black wattle is endemic to Tasmania, particularly the dryer areas (300-700mm/year). The tree is very responsive to fire (indeed any
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 3, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Gday from Tasmania.

          The black wattle is endemic to Tasmania, particularly the dryer areas
          (300-700mm/year). The tree is very responsive to fire (indeed any
          form of root damage) and produces suckers (as well as seed) liberally.

          A magnificent tree, however, I agree with Emilia to be careful with
          shifting species across continents (especially in the case of pioneer
          species). Black wattle can become very weedlike which in its native
          habitat is its greatest asset, but the rest of the world over is
          still locked in the mindset that weeds must die, and poisons,
          bulldozers etc are the result of nature greening itself.

          There are at least a dozen endemic acacias to Tasmania (and hundreds
          across australia) - all are spedific in their site prefence and also
          their biological succession values. I suspect that most bio regions
          across the globe will have a nitrogen fixer (or other forms of
          pioneer species, site specific) that can assume the regenerative role
          in the forest ecosystem. Be careful when you engage your mind (ie
          choosing to shift species at will)- and take full responsibility for
          your actions.

          Good luck with Greening

          Scott Bazely
          Tasmania


          --- In fukuoka_farming@y..., "emilia" <emhaz@l...> wrote:
          > hi finefroc,
          > it seems that there is an spelling mistake & that it is actually
          the acacia
          > "mollissima", (Acacia mearnsii, de Wild), also known as acacia
          decurrens or
          > "black wattle", as it is with all true acacias it wont stand cold
          climate
          > although it has more tolerence to cool winters than others & can
          even stand
          > moderately mild frosts (-3°C), it needs neutral to acid soils & is
          not
          > tolerant to alkaline or calcareous soils.
          > rather than copying "literally" Fukuoka, try to find the nitrogen
          fixing
          > trees that best corresponds to ur climatic & soil conditions...
          > 2 leguminous trees -so far- are known not to fix nitrogen: the
          Gleditschia
          > triacanthos & Ceratonia siliqua edulis..
          > best wishes! emilia
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.