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Re: Thank You Carol

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  • Jim Bones
    Thank you Carol, for sending us Wendell s thoughts. I hope those who think they are at the controls just now have a chance to see and meditate on them. With
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 19, 2001
      Thank you Carol, for sending us Wendell's thoughts. I hope those who
      think they are at the controls just now have a chance to see and
      meditate on them.

      With regard to Sensei's books, they are indeed all out of print. A few
      pirate editions printed in other countries without his permission are
      floating around. In a recent communication from someone knowledgeable
      about these things I was told he has recalled all of his books and is
      preparing one final book about Natural Farming, with special emphasis on
      using seed balls. He apparently feels his ideas are not being well
      understood and so people are carelessly breaking up the elements of
      Natural Farming and applying them piecemeal the way some mix and match
      other garden philosophies. If you are serious about practicing Natural
      Farming get a copy of The Natural Way Of Farming.

      I would like to offer the following personal observations. It may help
      to step back a little and see
      the current global political events unfolding in the context of world
      ecology and with a geological reference for time. We are in the midst
      of a major, mass species extinction. Thousands of ways of life are
      disappearing each day, most too small to merit our star struck
      preference for glamorous creatures in fur coats with beautiful teeth.
      But it is largely these "little people", the microbes, one celled and
      tiny multicelled creatures, that maintain the living cycles of the
      earth. They are taking big hits everywhere, everyday without letup,
      wherever we are "developing unused land". Watch out for the fast talk?
      Every place is already somebody's home.

      These extinction's are directly related to our exploding human
      population with all its attendant poisonous and environmentally
      disruptive activities. Loss of habitat is absolutely lethal. Political
      discord is directly related to overcrowding of less developed nations by
      powerful wealthy nations seeking to maintain a material status quo that
      is ecologically doomed. Gaining control of all world resources will not
      prevent their consumptive exhaustion nor the collapse of civilization.
      The oil will run out and chemical agriculture will fail. It may appear
      that those with the most oil and toys at the end of civilization might
      win some survival advantage. But war is unhealthy for all living
      beings.

      There will be no political winners in this one, only the earth as a
      whole. Mass species extinctions are not uncommon in the geologic
      record. Some geologists recognize as many as 25 or 30 in the last 1000
      million years. Three were particularly devastating to multicellular
      life and one, the great
      Permian/Triassic catastrophe, about 200 million years ago, extinguished
      95% of the species existing at the time. A bright note here, everything
      you see today results from the survivors of that and later mass
      extinctions, including the little Cretaceous/Tertiary one that ended the
      tottering dinosaurs. Life is tough and experienced and infinitely
      intelligent. It will probably survive this one too. We may not. The
      survival value of our kind of "intelligence" has yet to be fully
      demonstrated.

      Catastrophe seems to be a way of life on this planet, what with
      continents colliding and parting, volcanoes exploding and huge celestial
      objects regularly crashing in. It also seems that at times of "major
      planetary biomass overload" as a geologist friend puts it, such as those
      that come after long periods of stable conditions, biological collapse
      may occur from "within". It may be similar to the way old growth
      vegetational units are superseded by new waves of successional plants
      following natural, but relatively minor ecological disruptions such as
      fires, floods, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. It may be a way of
      opening up new avenues when evolutionary traffic is grid locked.

      The only constant tune in this universe is change and nature dances well
      to it. The changes sweeping over us just now are geologically immense
      and there is not a lot we can do about it. As conscious beings the best
      we can do is try to move with it and perhaps make contributions in small
      ways that will have lasting beneficial consequences.

      Something constructive we humans can do right now is to recognize the
      magnitude of these issues, especially the enormous population issues and
      focus attention on nonviolent ways of cooperatively dealing with them.
      Bluntly put, 6 billion-plus people cannot continue to consume the earth
      at the current rate. A lot of natural dying is near at hand no matter
      what we do. Extreme population crowding in many species leads to
      aberrant behavior including but not limited to, reproductive
      disruptions, violent conflicts and cannibalism. Some creatures even
      consume their own young and the young of others when times are tough.
      War is part of our conventional human animal response. We must step
      beyond the conventional at this point in time and behave like the
      intelligent beings we have the potential to become, or cease to be
      altogether.

      What we arrogantly call resources are finite, including living ones. No
      amount of spin rhetoric will change the truth of that. If we want to
      stay around as a species to see the next regeneration of life on earth,
      we will have to accept a lot of simplification in our ways and a
      willingness to participate in the simple renewable cycles and forgo the
      greedy fast tracks to wealth and power. All the little well meaning
      attempts at environmental and species protection are little more than
      feel good diversions or mass denials of the real problems which are
      beyond political control. No matter what your cause, it is already a
      lost cause unless it includes a clear view of human population dynamics.

      Realistically we are experiencing a disaster that demands the ecological
      equivalent of medical triage. The best we may be able to do at this
      point is determine and designate areas of the earth that stand a
      relatively good chance of retaining some biological diversity and
      concentrating our preservation and rehabilitation efforts there. Forget
      about the deceptive notion of "restoration" of environments. Too much
      is changing too fast to make that possible any longer. We can try to
      protect and preserve, but nature is in the process of selecting right
      now from the world gene pool who and what will survive. The greater the
      extent of wild and natural landscapes that continue to exist, the
      greater the diversity of possibilities life will have to work with in
      the next phase of evolution, the next act in the great play.

      Natural Farming is particularly appealing for this reason. Many of the
      popular organic approaches to agriculture today claim to make it
      possible to preserve more wild nature while continuing to feed unchecked
      numbers of people through intensive practices. I have seen too many
      extravagant, over designed and over dug gardens that fail to feed anyone
      or pay attention to the basic dignity and fundamental needs of nature.
      Unfortunately, everyone is leaving it to "someone" else to preserve wild
      nature while we go tilling ever more soil. This is the same "intensive"
      attitude that underlies conventional agriculture--the attitude of
      harvesting 100% of everything in nature for the perpetual unlimited
      benefit and growth of humans. Natural Farming is incorporated in
      nature, not the other way round. By practicing first the promotion and
      well being of nature and second our cooperative uses of nature we may
      finally be able to enter a beneficial and potentially long lasting
      relationship with life on this planet. If not, we are out of here for
      good. Extinct species never return!

      So plant gardens large and small with all species that may grow in your
      home region. Sow seeds and seed balls in all damaged and over worn
      places. Include the traditional seeds of foods, herbs and fibers that
      are also our living heritage. Teach children everywhere the simple ways
      of renewable agriculture which are so like the hunting and gathering
      ways of our ancestors. Finally, take solace in the fact that all life
      is really one being and so long as any thing lives on this earth we all
      continue to participate. With love and grace and green leaves, in time
      we may also all flourish.

      Sincerely.

      Jim Bones







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rex Teague
      Jim et al Like Larry your thoughtful post has stimulated a few observations from my neck of the woods too. 8
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 26, 2001
        Jim et al

        Like Larry your thoughtful post has stimulated a few observations
        from my neck of the woods too. 8<)

        On 19 Oct 01, Jim Bones wrote: (heavily snipped)

        > Thank you Carol, for sending us Wendell's thoughts. I hope those
        > who think they are at the controls just now have a chance to see
        > and meditate on them.

        Wendell Berry's writing appeals to me immensely and at the risk of
        stating the obvious he did write the preface to 'The One-Straw
        Revolution' as published by Rodale.

        > I would like to offer the following personal observations. It may
        > help to step back a little and see the current global political events
        > unfolding in the context of world ecology and with a geological
        > reference for time. We are in the midst of a major, mass species
        > extinction. Thousands of ways of life are disappearing each day, most
        > too small to merit our star struck preference for glamorous creatures
        > in fur coats with beautiful teeth. But it is largely these "little
        > people", the microbes, one celled and tiny multicelled creatures, that
        > maintain the living cycles of the earth. They are taking big hits
        > everywhere, everyday without letup, wherever we are "developing unused
        > land". Watch out for the fast talk? Every place is already somebody's
        > home.

        Have you considered the possibility of pleomorphism/polymorphism
        and 'intent'? A few suggestive snippets:

        From: http://www.explorepub.com/articles/enderlein3.html

        "The first and probably most disastrous error originates from
        Ferdinand Cohn, who in 1870 proclaimed that all microbes and
        bacteria have only one form (Monomorphism). This was also taught
        by Louis Pasteur. This teaching was opposed to the teaching of
        Antoine Bechamp who, roughly at the same time, could demonstrate
        that microbes can alter their form and appear as different germs
        (pleomorphism). Enderlein basically confirmed this and many other
        researchers after him."

        From: http://www.explorepub.com/articles/coyle_10_3.html

        Polymorphism is a fact, certainly in some species of microorganisms
        (especially fungal), and is clearly demonstrable microscopically with
        the proper equipment.

        And on 'intent' Yogananda speaks about Luther Burbank

        'When I met Luther Burbank, he showed me a walnut tree and said,
        "I took off more than 100 years from its usual period of growth. I
        grew that tree in 12 years." Burbank also made almomds have soft
        shells, made over the tomato, and created the shasta daisy from
        bulbs and the cactus without thorns. In primitive times the different
        animals used to eat the cactus, so the cactus developed protective
        thorns. When one life begins to hurt another, that life develops
        weapons of defense. Burbank told me that during his experiments in
        developing the spineless cactus, every day he went into the garden
        and talked to the barbed plants: "Please, beloved cactus, I am Luther
        Burbank, your friend. I am not going to hurt you at all, so why
        develop thorns?" And so the thornless cactus was developed. By
        talking, by attention, by thought force and knowledge of nature's
        laws, you can impress certain vibrations on protoplasm, and thus
        consciously guide and hasten the process of evolution.'

        I'm optimistic about the process of 'Nature' as exemplified by
        Fukuoka's 'not doing' wisdom.

        Cheers... Rex
      • Bargyla Rateaver
        Dear Rex Teague, at last at last I get somewhere. This must be what I was hunting for and could not find. Is there anywhere else I can get more of rhis
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 3, 2001
          Dear Rex Teague, at last at last I get somewhere. This must be what I was
          hunting for and could not find. Is there anywhere else I can get more of
          rhis information? Especially i want to know, have you seen that enormous
          fragment of the Rife microscope? Long ago I was taken to a small house where
          it is housed--that part of it not destroyed? I'd like to go again. Who could
          take me to it?

          I am glad I have found you again. Please tell me where I can find you again
          when I need you. Thanks.
          ==========================
          Rex Teague wrote:

          > Jim et al
          >
          > Like Larry your thoughtful post has stimulated a few observations
          > from my neck of the woods too. 8<)
          >
          > On 19 Oct 01, Jim Bones wrote: (heavily snipped)
          >
          > > Thank you Carol, for sending us Wendell's thoughts. I hope those
          > > who think they are at the controls just now have a chance to see
          > > and meditate on them.
          >
          > Wendell Berry's writing appeals to me immensely and at the risk of
          > stating the obvious he did write the preface to 'The One-Straw
          > Revolution' as published by Rodale.
          >
          > > I would like to offer the following personal observations. It may
          > > help to step back a little and see the current global political events
          > > unfolding in the context of world ecology and with a geological
          > > reference for time. We are in the midst of a major, mass species
          > > extinction. Thousands of ways of life are disappearing each day, most
          > > too small to merit our star struck preference for glamorous creatures
          > > in fur coats with beautiful teeth. But it is largely these "little
          > > people", the microbes, one celled and tiny multicelled creatures, that
          > > maintain the living cycles of the earth. They are taking big hits
          > > everywhere, everyday without letup, wherever we are "developing unused
          > > land". Watch out for the fast talk? Every place is already somebody's
          > > home.
          >
          > Have you considered the possibility of pleomorphism/polymorphism
          > and 'intent'? A few suggestive snippets:
          >
          > From: http://www.explorepub

          > com/articles/enderlein3.html
          >
          > "The first and probably most disastrous error originates from
          > Ferdinand Cohn, who in 1870 proclaimed that all microbes and
          > bacteria have only one form (Monomorphism). This was also taught
          > by Louis Pasteur. This teaching was opposed to the teaching of
          > Antoine Bechamp who, roughly at the same time, could demonstrate
          > that microbes can alter their form and appear as different germs
          > (pleomorphism). Enderlein basically confirmed this and many other
          > researchers after him."
          >
          > From: http://www.explorepub.com/articles/coyle_10_3.html
          >
          > Polymorphism is a fact, certainly in some species of microorganisms
          > (especially fungal), and is clearly demonstrable microscopically with
          > the proper equipment.
          >
          > And on 'intent' Yogananda speaks about Luther Burbank
          >
          > 'When I met Luther Burbank, he showed me a walnut tree and said,
          > "I took off more than 100 years from its usual period of growth. I
          > grew that tree in 12 years." Burbank also made almomds have soft
          > shells, made over the tomato, and created the shasta daisy from
          > bulbs and the cactus without thorns. In primitive times the different
          > animals used to eat the cactus, so the cactus developed protective
          > thorns. When one life begins to hurt another, that life develops
          > weapons of defense. Burbank told me that during his experiments in
          > developing the spineless cactus, every day he went into the garden
          > and talked to the barbed plants: "Please, beloved cactus, I am Luther
          > Burbank, your friend. I am not going to hurt you at all, so why
          > develop thorns?" And so the thornless cactus was developed. By
          > talking, by attention, by thought force and knowledge of nature's
          > laws, you can impress certain vibrations on protoplasm, and thus
          > consciously guide and hasten the process of evolution.'
          >
          > I'm optimistic about the process of 'Nature' as exemplified by
          > Fukuoka's 'not doing' wisdom.
          >
          > Cheers... Rex
          >
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

          --

          Bargyla Rateaver
          http://home.earthlink.net/~brateaver



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Rex Teague
          Hello Bargyla et al ... No I haven t seen any Rife microscope fragments but I share your curiosity about Rife s innovations. It is many years since I dropped
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 5, 2001
            Hello Bargyla et al

            On 4 Nov 01, Bargyla Rateaver wrote:
            > Dear Rex Teague, at last at last I get somewhere. This must be
            > what I was hunting for and could not find. Is there anywhere else I
            > can get more of rhis information? Especially i want to know, have
            > you seen that enormous fragment of the Rife microscope? Long ago I
            > was taken to a small house where it is housed--that part of it not
            > destroyed? I'd like to go again. Who could take me to it?

            No I haven't seen any Rife microscope fragments but I share your
            curiosity about Rife's innovations. It is many years since I dropped off
            the Bare/Rife list, a number of people were attempting to reproduce
            his microscope and other equipment. A potted history of the
            microscope is available at http://www.rife.de/mscope/mscope1.htm.
            There is a reference to the possibility of one in private ownership in
            the USA... maybe what you have seen?

            Gaston Naessens has developed a very powerful microscope which
            he uses for his live blood/somatid research http://www.cerbe.com

            Michael Coyle whom I quoted briefly in my previous post offers
            courses in dark-field microscopy: http://www.nulifesciences.com

            > I am glad I have found you again. Please tell me where I can find
            > you again when I need you. Thanks.

            I don't reside in the USA but I'm happy to discuss the topic further...
            off-list!? 8<)

            Cheers... Rex
          • Bargyla Rateaver
            Thank you so very much, Rex Teague. I am so pleased to see you here, have wanted for a long time to find you. Hope you don t disappear. Years ago I was
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 6, 2001
              Thank you so very much, Rex Teague. I am so pleased to see you here, have
              wanted for a long time to find you. Hope you don't disappear.
              Years ago I was privileged to see, in a cottage, part of the enormous
              microscope, of which part has disappeared. I think it was from Rife??? I
              shall ask someone tomorrow.
              ============
              Rex Teague wrote:

              > Jim et al
              >
              > Like Larry your thoughtful post has stimulated a few observations
              > from my neck of the woods too. 8<)
              >
              > On 19 Oct 01, Jim Bones wrote: (heavily snipped)
              >
              > > Thank you Carol, for sending us Wendell's thoughts. I hope those
              > > who think they are at the controls just now have a chance to see
              > > and meditate on them.
              >
              > Wendell Berry's writing appeals to me immensely and at the risk of
              > stating the obvious he did write the preface to 'The One-Straw
              > Revolution' as published by Rodale.
              >
              > > I would like to offer the following personal observations. It may
              > > help to step back a little and see the current global political events
              > > unfolding in the context of world ecology and with a geological
              > > reference for time. We are in the midst of a major, mass species
              > > extinction. Thousands of ways of life are disappearing each day, most
              > > too small to merit our star struck preference for glamorous creatures
              > > in fur coats with beautiful teeth. But it is largely these "little
              > > people", the microbes, one celled and tiny multicelled creatures, that
              > > maintain the living cycles of the earth. They are taking big hits
              > > everywhere, everyday without letup, wherever we are "developing unused
              > > land". Watch out for the fast talk? Every place is already somebody's
              > > home.
              >
              > Have you considered the possibility of pleomorphism/polymorphism
              > and 'intent'? A few suggestive snippets:
              >
              > From: http://www.explorepub.com/articles/enderlein3.html
              >
              > "The first and probably most disastrous error originates from
              > Ferdinand Cohn, who in 1870 proclaimed that all microbes and
              > bacteria have only one form (Monomorphism). This was also taught
              > by Louis Pasteur. This teaching was opposed to the teaching of
              > Antoine Bechamp who, roughly at the same time, could demonstrate
              > that microbes can alter their form and appear as different germs
              > (pleomorphism). Enderlein basically confirmed this and many other
              > researchers after him."
              >
              > From: http://www.explorepub.com/articles/coyle_10_3.html
              >
              > Polymorphism is a fact, certainly in some species of microorganisms
              > (especially fungal), and is clearly demonstrable microscopically with
              > the proper equipment.
              >
              > And on 'intent' Yogananda speaks about Luther Burbank
              >
              > 'When I met Luther Burbank, he showed me a walnut tree and said,
              > "I took off more than 100 years from its usual period of growth. I
              > grew that tree in 12 years." Burbank also made almomds have soft
              > shells, made over the tomato, and created the shasta daisy from
              > bulbs and the cactus without thorns. In primitive times the different
              > animals used to eat the cactus, so the cactus developed protective
              > thorns. When one life begins to hurt another, that life develops
              > weapons of defense. Burbank told me that during his experiments in
              > developing the spineless cactus, every day he went into the garden
              > and talked to the barbed plants: "Please, beloved cactus, I am Luther
              > Burbank, your friend. I am not going to hurt you at all, so why
              > develop thorns?" And so the thornless cactus was developed. By
              > talking, by attention, by thought force and knowledge of nature's
              > laws, you can impress certain vibrations on protoplasm, and thus
              > consciously guide and hasten the process of evolution.'
              >
              > I'm optimistic about the process of 'Nature' as exemplified by
              > Fukuoka's 'not doing' wisdom.
              >
              > Cheers... Rex
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

              --

              Bargyla Rateaver
              http://home.earthlink.net/~brateaver
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