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Fukuoka's Albert Howard Memorial Lecture

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  • Allan Balliett
    Does anyone have access to a transcript of this presentation? It must have occurred around 2001. Thanks -Allan igg@igg.com Organic farming need of the hour:
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 5, 2006
      Does anyone have access to a transcript of this presentation? It
      must have occurred around 2001. Thanks -Allan igg@...

      Organic farming need of the hour: Fukuoka
      NEW DELHI, Oct 6: The world renowned author of "one straw
      revolution", Masanobu Fukuoka has called for a world wide effort to
      popularise organic farming so that harmony with nature is maintained.
      Delivering the third albert howard memorial lecture on "the greatest
      mistakes of mankind" here on Wednesday, Fukuoka said the land is
      losing its fertility due to the extensive use of chemical fertilisers
      and genetically-modified seeds land all over the world.
      "Where ever I have gone to study agricultural patterns, the biggest
      threat to farmers is from chemical fertilisers and genetically
      modified seeds which can degenerate the land in the long -run," he
      said.
      "Already 40-45 per cent of the total agricultural production in the
      world is by genetically-modified seeds which can spell doom for
      agriculture," he observed.
      In Japan, he said, 40 years ago one straw produced 100 grains while
      today due to the so-called chemical farming or mechanised farming
      that yield has gone down to just 70-80 grains in one straw.
      Fukuoka, whose book "one straw revolution" is revered by many as
      being one of the most authentic books on organic farming said the
      book, which he had written at the age of only 25 was meant to achieve
      the objective of creating awareness among the farming community on
      the threats they face from big multinationals companies in the years
      to come, has failed to achieve its goal.
      "My book was a foolish idea because I never realised that farmers too
      will take so many years to realise the ill effects of using excessive
      fertisers and genetically-modified seeds," he said.
      Terming India's growth in agriculture as a journey with numerous
      pitfalls, Fukuoka said in all these years india may have become
      self-sufficient in agriculture and grown in the field of information
      technology but it has lost the wisdom of the great leaders and
      thinkers like Mahatma Gandhi and Gautam Buddha.
      "Information Technology is in fact 'intellectual profit' whose sole
      aim is to generate wealth and earn profit without caring for the
      environment as well as for the people," he said.
      He, however, was full of praise for the increase in awareness level
      about environmental issues in India.
      "Indians have shown that awareness about one's environment can really
      make a difference in the way we think and also in the way we act," he
      said. Fukuoka whose contribution to agriculture is no less than that
      of any scientist, also revealed to the Indian farmers his
      self-developed variety of rice named after him,"Fukuoka rice". The
      rice which can give a yield two times more than the best genetically
      modified rice has been prepared by natural breeding and use of
      organic materials.
      "I have experimented with sowing this rice variety in the coldest
      places all over the world and there has been no difference in their
      yield, whereas no other crop variety, even the best
      genetically-modified ones can claim that it can grow in any kind of
      climate," he said.
      Fukuoka added his rice variety which was developed some 25 years ago
      was kept away from the world because he never wanted anyone else
      other than the poor farmers to know about his discovery.
      "In southern India, this rice can give a yield three times more than
      the present varieties, which can go a long way in solving the food
      problems of this country," Fukuoka said.
      He called upon farmers in India to take full advantage of his rice
      variety so that they can earn more without harming the environment.
      Environment Minister of Ethiopia, Dr Tewolde Egziaber, who chaired
      the lecture, said the recently held World Summit on Sustainable
      Development (WSSD) had given something to the pro-environment lobby
      as it has managed to delete clauses which would have given precedence
      to wto laws over local environmental laws.
      Tewolde, who was the chief negotiator for African nations in WSSD
      said, "though we have an uphill task in our hand, because we have
      started late, but slowly this realisation is dawning upon the trade
      organisations that environmental issues cannot be skirted for long."
      He regretted that United Nations has not been forthcoming in
      supporting the cause of the environmentalists.
      Noted environmentalists from India, Dr Vandana Shiva, who organised
      the lecture announced the Gandhi award for contribution to
      preservation of the environment.
      Activist Pushpa Bhargava and Khadi and Village Industries Corporation
      have won the award this year for promotion of nature friendly
      techniques of agriculture. (UNI)
    • Allan Balliett
      Someone help me here, if you can. Is my request really that obscure? I d think that everyone would know about this lecture or be looking for it. This is the
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 9, 2006
        Someone help me here, if you can. Is my request really that obscure?
        I'd think that everyone would know about this lecture or be looking
        for it. This is the reason he went to India a few years back. Thanks
        for your thoughts. -Allan

        >Does anyone have access to a transcript of this presentation? It
        >must have occurred around 2001. Thanks -Allan igg@...
        >
        >Organic farming need of the hour: Fukuoka
        >NEW DELHI, Oct 6: The world renowned author of "one straw
        >revolution", Masanobu Fukuoka has called for a world wide effort to
        >popularise organic farming so that harmony with nature is maintained.
        >Delivering the third albert howard memorial lecture on "the greatest
        >mistakes of mankind" here on Wednesday, Fukuoka said the land is
        >losing its fertility due to the extensive use of chemical fertilisers
        >and genetically-modified seeds land all over the world.
        >"Where ever I have gone to study agricultural patterns, the biggest
        >threat to farmers is from chemical fertilisers and genetically
        >modified seeds which can degenerate the land in the long -run," he
        >said.
        >"Already 40-45 per cent of the total agricultural production in the
        >world is by genetically-modified seeds which can spell doom for
        >agriculture," he observed.
        >In Japan, he said, 40 years ago one straw produced 100 grains while
        >today due to the so-called chemical farming or mechanised farming
        >that yield has gone down to just 70-80 grains in one straw.
        >Fukuoka, whose book "one straw revolution" is revered by many as
        >being one of the most authentic books on organic farming said the
        >book, which he had written at the age of only 25 was meant to achieve
        >the objective of creating awareness among the farming community on
        >the threats they face from big multinationals companies in the years
        >to come, has failed to achieve its goal.
        >"My book was a foolish idea because I never realised that farmers too
        >will take so many years to realise the ill effects of using excessive
        >fertisers and genetically-modified seeds," he said.
        >Terming India's growth in agriculture as a journey with numerous
        >pitfalls, Fukuoka said in all these years india may have become
        >self-sufficient in agriculture and grown in the field of information
        >technology but it has lost the wisdom of the great leaders and
        >thinkers like Mahatma Gandhi and Gautam Buddha.
        >"Information Technology is in fact 'intellectual profit' whose sole
        >aim is to generate wealth and earn profit without caring for the
        >environment as well as for the people," he said.
        >He, however, was full of praise for the increase in awareness level
        >about environmental issues in India.
        >"Indians have shown that awareness about one's environment can really
        >make a difference in the way we think and also in the way we act," he
        >said. Fukuoka whose contribution to agriculture is no less than that
        >of any scientist, also revealed to the Indian farmers his
        >self-developed variety of rice named after him,"Fukuoka rice". The
        >rice which can give a yield two times more than the best genetically
        >modified rice has been prepared by natural breeding and use of
        >organic materials.
        >"I have experimented with sowing this rice variety in the coldest
        >places all over the world and there has been no difference in their
        >yield, whereas no other crop variety, even the best
        >genetically-modified ones can claim that it can grow in any kind of
        >climate," he said.
        >Fukuoka added his rice variety which was developed some 25 years ago
        >was kept away from the world because he never wanted anyone else
        >other than the poor farmers to know about his discovery.
        >"In southern India, this rice can give a yield three times more than
        >the present varieties, which can go a long way in solving the food
        >problems of this country," Fukuoka said.
        >He called upon farmers in India to take full advantage of his rice
        >variety so that they can earn more without harming the environment.
        >Environment Minister of Ethiopia, Dr Tewolde Egziaber, who chaired
        >the lecture, said the recently held World Summit on Sustainable
        >Development (WSSD) had given something to the pro-environment lobby
        >as it has managed to delete clauses which would have given precedence
        >to wto laws over local environmental laws.
        >Tewolde, who was the chief negotiator for African nations in WSSD
        >said, "though we have an uphill task in our hand, because we have
        >started late, but slowly this realisation is dawning upon the trade
        >organisations that environmental issues cannot be skirted for long."
        >He regretted that United Nations has not been forthcoming in
        >supporting the cause of the environmentalists.
        >Noted environmentalists from India, Dr Vandana Shiva, who organised
        >the lecture announced the Gandhi award for contribution to
        >preservation of the environment.
        >Activist Pushpa Bhargava and Khadi and Village Industries Corporation
        >have won the award this year for promotion of nature friendly
        >techniques of agriculture. (UNI)
        >
        >
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Royal A. Purdy
        Allan, Check with Vital Speeches of the Day (www.votd.com) They may be able to help you. They may or may not have it on file, but if you email them your
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 9, 2006
          Allan,

          Check with "Vital Speeches of the Day" (www.votd.com) They may be able
          to help you. They may or may not have it on file, but if you email
          them your request they may be able to help find it.

          Good luck. Be safe. Sincerely,

          Royal Purdy


          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Allan Balliett <igg@...> wrote:
          >
          > Someone help me here, if you can. Is my request really that obscure?
          > I'd think that everyone would know about this lecture or be looking
          > for it. This is the reason he went to India a few years back. Thanks
          > for your thoughts. -Allan
          >
        • rajutitus lal
          Dear friend, We are practising and preaching natural way of farming since about two decades.I met fukuoka two times in India ,first when he was invited by
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 11, 2006
            Dear friend,
            We are practising and preaching natural way of farming since about two decades.I met
            fukuoka two times in India ,first when he was invited by govt. of india to present paper
            in science congress.At that time he also visited our farm. We spant 3days with him.Second time we met him in Verdha (Gandhi ashram).In 1988 january when he visited our farm.He gave no one to our farm in the over all those farms who he visited in his world tour.We never read or heard from him in the favour of any thing about Organic way of Farming.In Verdha (Gandhi ashram) he told that organic way of farming is also a scientific way of farming and is not sustainable at all because of Tilling.
            In India so many N.G.O."s are getting fund to promote organic wayof farming.They are mixing Natural in to organic farming and using fukuoka"s name this is not good .We are very humbly want say that we are not against the theory of organic farming.If people wants to use fukuokas name with any method they must stop tilling.
            Now a days zero tillage agriculture is spreading very fast in India.Even
            Indian scientific reaserch institute is promoting zero Tillage it means farmers are comming close to nature.More than 2o thousnds hactare land in wheat is under zero Tillage agricultuer in India.Tilling is very harmful to land ,although farmers those using this method they are using zero tillage seed drill and chemical ferteliser .They are saying that they are reducing chemicals because due to zero tillage the fertelity and water holding capacity of the field is improving.Now they are not burning and removing straws from thier field.According to our experiance there is no need of any fertelizer in the zero tillage system of agricultuer and no use of insecticide and pesticide.
            Tilling is killing .The demand of fertelizers,weedicites,insecticides/pesticides is only
            in dying fields.This is wrong idia that instead of inorganic ,use of organics can solve this problem.If we stop tilling we can easily get out of so many things.
            We found lot of problems in understanding what fukuoka wants to say due to wrong
            translation but luckeily we got translation direct japani to Hindi.I do not know in what
            interest you are demanding copy of this speach.I personally feels that this speech was used in some personal interest because in this speech there is not a single word about Tilling. Thanks-Raju_(I am not good in English)


            Allan Balliett <igg@...> wrote:
            Does anyone have access to a transcript of this presentation? It
            must have occurred around 2001. Thanks -Allan igg@...

            Organic farming need of the hour: Fukuoka
            NEW DELHI, Oct 6: The world renowned author of "one straw
            revolution", Masanobu Fukuoka has called for a world wide effort to
            popularise organic farming so that harmony with nature is maintained.
            Delivering the third albert howard memorial lecture on "the greatest
            mistakes of mankind" here on Wednesday, Fukuoka said the land is
            losing its fertility due to the extensive use of chemical fertilisers
            and genetically-modified seeds land all over the world.
            "Where ever I have gone to study agricultural patterns, the biggest
            threat to farmers is from chemical fertilisers and genetically
            modified seeds which can degenerate the land in the long -run," he
            said.
            "Already 40-45 per cent of the total agricultural production in the
            world is by genetically-modified seeds which can spell doom for
            agriculture," he observed.
            In Japan, he said, 40 years ago one straw produced 100 grains while
            today due to the so-called chemical farming or mechanised farming
            that yield has gone down to just 70-80 grains in one straw.
            Fukuoka, whose book "one straw revolution" is revered by many as
            being one of the most authentic books on organic farming said the
            book, which he had written at the age of only 25 was meant to achieve
            the objective of creating awareness among the farming community on
            the threats they face from big multinationals companies in the years
            to come, has failed to achieve its goal.
            "My book was a foolish idea because I never realised that farmers too
            will take so many years to realise the ill effects of using excessive
            fertisers and genetically-modified seeds," he said.
            Terming India's growth in agriculture as a journey with numerous
            pitfalls, Fukuoka said in all these years india may have become
            self-sufficient in agriculture and grown in the field of information
            technology but it has lost the wisdom of the great leaders and
            thinkers like Mahatma Gandhi and Gautam Buddha.
            "Information Technology is in fact 'intellectual profit' whose sole
            aim is to generate wealth and earn profit without caring for the
            environment as well as for the people," he said.
            He, however, was full of praise for the increase in awareness level
            about environmental issues in India.
            "Indians have shown that awareness about one's environment can really
            make a difference in the way we think and also in the way we act," he
            said. Fukuoka whose contribution to agriculture is no less than that
            of any scientist, also revealed to the Indian farmers his
            self-developed variety of rice named after him,"Fukuoka rice". The
            rice which can give a yield two times more than the best genetically
            modified rice has been prepared by natural breeding and use of
            organic materials.
            "I have experimented with sowing this rice variety in the coldest
            places all over the world and there has been no difference in their
            yield, whereas no other crop variety, even the best
            genetically-modified ones can claim that it can grow in any kind of
            climate," he said.
            Fukuoka added his rice variety which was developed some 25 years ago
            was kept away from the world because he never wanted anyone else
            other than the poor farmers to know about his discovery.
            "In southern India, this rice can give a yield three times more than
            the present varieties, which can go a long way in solving the food
            problems of this country," Fukuoka said.
            He called upon farmers in India to take full advantage of his rice
            variety so that they can earn more without harming the environment.
            Environment Minister of Ethiopia, Dr Tewolde Egziaber, who chaired
            the lecture, said the recently held World Summit on Sustainable
            Development (WSSD) had given something to the pro-environment lobby
            as it has managed to delete clauses which would have given precedence
            to wto laws over local environmental laws.
            Tewolde, who was the chief negotiator for African nations in WSSD
            said, "though we have an uphill task in our hand, because we have
            started late, but slowly this realisation is dawning upon the trade
            organisations that environmental issues cannot be skirted for long."
            He regretted that United Nations has not been forthcoming in
            supporting the cause of the environmentalists.
            Noted environmentalists from India, Dr Vandana Shiva, who organised
            the lecture announced the Gandhi award for contribution to
            preservation of the environment.
            Activist Pushpa Bhargava and Khadi and Village Industries Corporation
            have won the award this year for promotion of nature friendly
            techniques of agriculture. (UNI)


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          • Allan Balliett
            ... Raju - Thanks for your good and illuminating post. I am asking for the Albert Howard lecture because I want to know what Mr Fukuoka s positions are in this
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 11, 2006
              > interest you are demanding copy of this speach.I personally feels
              >that this speech was used in some personal interest because in this
              >speech there is not a single word about Tilling. Thanks-Raju_(I am
              >not good in English)

              Raju - Thanks for your good and illuminating post. I am asking for
              the Albert Howard lecture because I want to know what Mr Fukuoka's
              positions are in this millenium and I am very concerned as to why
              this presentation seems to have 'disappeared.'

              Thanks again for sharing your experience.

              To Raju and anyone: how do you handle a commercial annual vegetable
              farm no-till?

              -Allan Balliett
              West Virginia
              USA
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