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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Digest Number 1020

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  • Thomas Younger
    Shane, With regards to wood coppicing poplars grow fairly fast and coppice well. There was an article in the Harrowsmith Reader2 which discussed using a
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 11, 2005
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      Shane,
      With regards to wood coppicing poplars grow fairly
      fast and coppice well. There was an article in the
      Harrowsmith Reader2 which discussed using a coppice at
      ground level of poplar every five years. One could
      heat a house sustainably on less than 5 acres. The
      idea behind the fast growing trees is that for a
      certain weight of wood the heat output is the same.
      In Ontario people favour the denser woods like Maple
      and Beech but weight for weight the woods give off the
      same heat. You would need to stoke your fire more
      with a less dense wood. A friend of mine has a Jotul
      cookstove which I admire because it is small and
      compact. Regards Tom

      --- fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com wrote:

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      >
      > There are 4 messages in this issue.
      >
      > Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. what would fukuoka do?
      > From: "witchessocks"
      > <witchessocks@...>
      > 2. Cooking with Wood, Coppicing
      > From: Shane Morkin <s_morkin@...>
      > 3. Re: Natural Farming
      > From: "karoubas" <karoubas@...>
      > 4. Re: Cooking with Wood, Coppicing
      > From: kemal pince
      > <kemal.pince@...>
      >
      >
      >
      ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Sun, 09 Oct 2005 16:43:51 -0000
      > From: "witchessocks" <witchessocks@...>
      > Subject: what would fukuoka do?
      >
      > thank you for your responses and your welcomes are
      > much appreciated!
      >
      > i feel honored to have the opportunity to wish you
      > a happy birthday,
      > gloria, and i hope you feel better soon. yes, a lot
      > of plants that i,
      > also, had planted either died, or didn't come up; it
      > was dry here too,
      > for a time. i guess we are left with the truly
      > strong, or luckily
      > situated plants now; oh well, that will save us some
      > work, perhaps.
      > nature does what she does perfect, right? nature
      > keeps cleaning
      > herself, one way or another, seemingly...it's all
      > good, ultimately!?
      > it is hard, though, on an individual note.
      >
      > napi, i think i do have some laurel. here is what
      > the tree looks like,
      > and the seedlings that have come up since i quit
      > mowing the "lawn"...
      >
      > http://aquat1.ifas.ufl.edu/cincam.pdf
      >
      > i haven't read much about serviceberries so far, but
      > i plan to
      > directly...do you suggest that i plant some? do you
      > have any? do deer
      > like this?
      >
      > meanwhile, i've still got this ailanthia...i can't
      > fathom paying a
      > tree service person to cut them down for 100 bucks a
      > tree (so, i'm
      > cheap!)...i think i remember reading a story (novel)
      > ages ago in which
      > a mother, who lived alone with her small children
      > needed to remove a
      > tree. she pulled it down, in pieces, with her bare
      > hands! i suppose
      > this was to describe her determination in the
      > absence of outside help
      > or large machinery. i feel like doing that myself...
      >
      > but then again, maybe the trees(ailanthia, or tree
      > of heaven) are
      > useful in a way that i can't understand. i know that
      > fukuoka wrote
      > about the acadia, and kudzu, both whom are
      > considered weeds in some
      > circles, as plants to be valued and used for their
      > fast growing
      > properties, their ability to improve the soil, fix
      > nitrogen, etc., and
      > he advocated control, as opposed to eradication. i
      > think ailanthia
      > does fix nitrogen, i'm pretty sure about that. i
      > could leave the big
      > trees, and only cut off the future seedlings when
      > they reach as
      > certain heights. but on the other hand, doesn't
      > ailanthia (sp?) give
      > off a noxious substance that is detremental to lots
      > of other plants? i
      > mean, i have enough toxins with the black walnut
      > trees! i don't know.
      > i can't bear to disrupt eco-systems, even invasive
      > ones! but i have
      > already cut down some of the smaller ones. i have a
      > lot of angst,
      > sometimes, i guess, about these things.
      >
      > how did mr. fukuoka-san take down tall trees when he
      > needed to clear a
      > place? maybe he just left them and studied them...i
      > know he wouldn't
      > have used cherry pickers or chain saws. would anyone
      > have some
      > knowledge or speculations about this? how did they
      > do this in the
      > olden days? any takers for these questions?!
      >
      > sincerely, robin, aka witchessocks <|:)
      >
      > Behind the iron Buddha's
      > straight back--
      > a cricket chirping.
      >
      > -michael p. garofalo
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 2
      > Date: Sun, 09 Oct 2005 22:10:37 +0200
      > From: Shane Morkin <s_morkin@...>
      > Subject: Cooking with Wood, Coppicing
      >
      > Dear Group,
      >
      > I¹m looking for information about wood stoves and
      > coppicing. Does anyone
      > out there cook their food with wood?
      >
      > Here in France (60km south of Paris) I am looking at
      > the model
      > ³L¹Emmanuelle² made by Wanders or ³C140² by
      > J.Corradi, anyone have an
      > opinion about either of them?
      >
      > In the videos I have watched about Mr Fukuoka¹s
      > life, the students cooked
      > their own meals over a small wood fire. As the iron
      > wood stoves are much
      > more efficient than an open fire I am hoping if I
      > plant a few willow trees
      > and coppice them they will provide ample fuel. I
      > purchased (sight-unseen) a
      > book called Home Grown Energy from Short-Rotation
      > Coppice, hoping it was a
      > ³how to² book. Instead it argued for harvesting
      > willow trees using
      > conventional agricultural methods to fuel large
      > power plants. If someone
      > can recommend a better book that tells you what
      > species of trees are good
      > for coppicing, how to raise them, and when to cut
      > them, that would be most
      > helpful.
      >
      >
      > Shane
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been
      > removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 3
      > Date: Mon, 10 Oct 2005 05:35:53 -0000
      > From: "karoubas" <karoubas@...>
      > Subject: Re: Natural Farming
      >
      > Hi Jean –Claude
      > I did not get a chance to see Panos, so I do not
      > have the answers to
      > your questions.
      > I have posted six new photos; I hope they help;
      > enjoy them.
      > Kostas
      >
      >
      === message truncated ===




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    • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
      . There was an article in the ... is it right? do you mean 5 acres of poplar plantation )that seem to be a lot of land required to just heat a house ( which
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 11, 2005
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        . There was an article in the
        > Harrowsmith Reader2 which discussed using a coppice at
        > ground level of poplar every five years. One could
        > heat a house sustainably on less than 5 acres.

        is it right? do you mean 5 acres of poplar plantation )that seem to be a lot
        of land required to just heat a house ( which climate?) the average volume
        of annual growth in north america in coniferous forests is 2,2 cubic meters
        per ha ( less than 1 cubic meter per acre ).i also found an other number
        that say the world volume of annual growth is one cubic metre per person.
        jean-claude
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