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what would fukuoka do?

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  • witchessocks
    thank you for your responses and your welcomes are much appreciated! i feel honored to have the opportunity to wish you a happy birthday, gloria, and i hope
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 9, 2005
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      thank you for your responses and your welcomes are much appreciated!

      i feel honored to have the opportunity to wish you a happy birthday,
      gloria, and i hope you feel better soon. yes, a lot of plants that i,
      also, had planted either died, or didn't come up; it was dry here too,
      for a time. i guess we are left with the truly strong, or luckily
      situated plants now; oh well, that will save us some work, perhaps.
      nature does what she does perfect, right? nature keeps cleaning
      herself, one way or another, seemingly...it's all good, ultimately!?
      it is hard, though, on an individual note.

      napi, i think i do have some laurel. here is what the tree looks like,
      and the seedlings that have come up since i quit mowing the "lawn"...

      http://aquat1.ifas.ufl.edu/cincam.pdf

      i haven't read much about serviceberries so far, but i plan to
      directly...do you suggest that i plant some? do you have any? do deer
      like this?

      meanwhile, i've still got this ailanthia...i can't fathom paying a
      tree service person to cut them down for 100 bucks a tree (so, i'm
      cheap!)...i think i remember reading a story (novel) ages ago in which
      a mother, who lived alone with her small children needed to remove a
      tree. she pulled it down, in pieces, with her bare hands! i suppose
      this was to describe her determination in the absence of outside help
      or large machinery. i feel like doing that myself...

      but then again, maybe the trees(ailanthia, or tree of heaven) are
      useful in a way that i can't understand. i know that fukuoka wrote
      about the acadia, and kudzu, both whom are considered weeds in some
      circles, as plants to be valued and used for their fast growing
      properties, their ability to improve the soil, fix nitrogen, etc., and
      he advocated control, as opposed to eradication. i think ailanthia
      does fix nitrogen, i'm pretty sure about that. i could leave the big
      trees, and only cut off the future seedlings when they reach as
      certain heights. but on the other hand, doesn't ailanthia (sp?) give
      off a noxious substance that is detremental to lots of other plants? i
      mean, i have enough toxins with the black walnut trees! i don't know.
      i can't bear to disrupt eco-systems, even invasive ones! but i have
      already cut down some of the smaller ones. i have a lot of angst,
      sometimes, i guess, about these things.

      how did mr. fukuoka-san take down tall trees when he needed to clear a
      place? maybe he just left them and studied them...i know he wouldn't
      have used cherry pickers or chain saws. would anyone have some
      knowledge or speculations about this? how did they do this in the
      olden days? any takers for these questions?!

      sincerely, robin, aka witchessocks <|:)

      Behind the iron Buddha's
      straight back--
      a cricket chirping.

      -michael p. garofalo
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