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ripening and fungal problems

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  • Anders Skarlind
    Hi folks In my intro I forgot to tell that since two years I am going BD (which do not exclude other approaches). The problems with ripening as well as fungal
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 15, 2005
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      Hi folks
      In my intro I forgot to tell that since two years I am going BD (which do
      not exclude other approaches).

      The problems with ripening as well as fungal problems have been discussed
      on Bdnow! ( Biodynamic Food and Farming Discussion,
      http://lists.envirolink.org/mailman/listinfo/bdnow ) for a while. Here are
      some excerpts, to help widen the perspective on this issue.
      Anders


      === Starting posts ===

      Is this "blossom end rot"? Is it on the first tomatoes of the vine?
      If so, it will probably go away. If not, it's a calcium deficiency.

      If it's not blossom end rot, then it's a fungal problem that's come
      to this valley this year, as well.

      I think you've all heard my laments about how 'everything is
      melting.' Brassicas are the hardest hit for me. Just rotting.
      Kholrabi like balls of puss, beets and chard blackened, heads of
      broccoli discolored, etc etc etc.

      I went down to the feed/seed store this week. Turns out that everyone
      who still grows food around here is having similar problems.

      I didn't mention: my tomatoes are ripening to ORANGE, not red, in most cases.

      This is happening to other farmers, as well, only their tomatoes
      taste like shit. Ours ripen to orange and still taste great! But it
      scares the hell out of me. Why a fruit ripening to a different color?
      Variety after variety.

      Along with this comes 'black flecks of the skin that are black rot
      1/2 inch long into the fruit.' We don't have this, but it seems like
      everyone else does.

      Enough about fruit and vegetables, though. Another thing that
      'everyone' was saying was that the sun isn't like it was as recently
      as a year ago. Now it is hotter. Now it heats you below your skin (IT
      DOES!!) Now direct sun at any air temperature is almost too much to
      bear.

      And this one, several grown men said to me "I put on a tan early in
      the season and never have trouble with the sun. During this heat
      wave, I get SUNBURNED through my tan, everytime I go outside.' Think
      about it. Sunburn 'through tan.' If it's doing that to a man, what is
      the produce dealing with?

      -Allan
      Sheplherdstown, WV

      >....never had these black spots on the bottom of tomatoes before.
      >We've had only one rain in 5 weeks, but watered by pail fairly
      >regularly. Any clues, anyone?...thanks,....manfred


      ==== on the intense sunlight and increasing UV radiation coming through ====

      Our last posting from Aurora Farm in British Columbia, 49N0350 Latutude,
      where for the last two summers [we've had no garden this year, preparing to
      sell and move] NONE of our tomatoes really ripened on the plant, even
      though, last year, our first frost was in mid-October. The sun--who can not
      have noticed this?--is intense, intense. I, who was born below the
      Mason-Dixon line, who have gardened in Arizona and Florida, have never
      experienced the sunshine this way--I go outside and in ten minutes I am
      reeling from the effects...and I will not believe this is "only" that I'm
      getting older. Great compassion from here to those whose livelihood
      depends on production of fruit crops this year. It's all we can do to
      survive in this intensity of heat [100F+ every day the past week] and
      light. It is not just heat, but also the LIGHT which is different....more
      *aggressive* perhaps?
      Woody and Barbara

      >Hi! Harold & Dylan,
      >You should try living where I do at 135degrees East by 36degrees South,
      >near Port Lincoln in South Australia. For much of our winter and each year
      >longer, the hole in the Ozone Layer expands to cover our area. When going
      >out doors, even on cold days, you can feel the strength of heat from the
      >sun. It can be like walking in front of an open baker's oven. We have the
      >highest level of skin cancer in Australia in my post code of 5606, not
      >something we enjoy. Each year we fair skinned Celts go to our GP for
      >inspection and having bits burnt off or cut out. We all know many who have
      >died from not having them removed in time. Although we live in a sparsely
      >populated area, we reap the end product of other populations releasing
      >Ozone destroying gases.
      >
      >Gil
      >Oz
      >
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>The Sun is harsher these days because he is getting p----d o-- about
      >>what we have done to the planet..... ;-)
      >>
      >>Best Regards Harold


      === Fungus problems as relates to the moon ===
      Hi Alan,
      It would be expected that you would be having major effects in the Northern
      Hemisphere over this summer growing season. We have noted on our planting
      calendars that the Full Moon, Moon Perigee (Moon close to earth) and Peak
      descension are all occuring together or very close in June, July and August
      this year. This would mean a massive impulse of Moon forces or moisture to
      the atmosphere, meaning an increase in fungal disease. EAch year it moves
      ahead one month, it can be easily seen on Brian Keats calendars - northern
      and southern hemispheres. Luckily for some of us in the southern hem. it is
      winter, and so is not as serious as it is for you. But our growers in
      Northern tropical areas are still having fungal problems.
      When I was in the USA last year, I noticed that all the cherry crops had
      brown rot and most were left on the trees unpicked and that you had more
      rain in June July than usual and crops were suffering.

      For 2006, this pattern of Full Moons, perigees and peak ascension or
      descension will occur in July, Ausg and Sept, so you will still need to have
      all your strength built up in your plants and soil prior to midsummer.

      This is where we can use precautionary and protection sprays with the BD
      preps as the plants are growing to prevent succumbing to the mildews and
      fungal diseases.

      Our Association recommends that our growers use the full set of BD preps -
      Soil Sprays - 500, Manure Concentrate (Barrel compost) Winter Horn clay and
      Equisetum 508 Fermented all mixed one hour and sprayed in droplet form to
      the soil late afternoon , followed next am with the Atmospheric sparys, 501,
      summer horn clay and Equisetum 508 fresh teas stirred at sunrise and sprayed
      as a mist into the air over the crops.

      We recommend that these sprays be done prior to planting and followed
      monthly throughout the crop, finishing with the 501 alone near to harvest.
      If fungal diseases do show up, the 501and 508 fresh can be sprayed more
      frequently. The BD Seaweed spray also helps support the plant through these
      stressful times.and is used weekly as well.The use of the BD Compost preps
      502-507 in the seaweed tea and Manure Concentrate increases their important
      influence into the soil and atmosphere.

      The use of Biodynamic compost and green manures as part of the soil
      preparation are also of great benefit to bringing the whole market garden
      into balance and optimum production.

      Cheryl Kemp
      Biodynamic Agriculture Australia


      === approaching magnetic pool shift? ===

      Fellers,
      we had yellow shitty tomatoes last year and fungus did not 'read' to be
      the primary cause.
      Radiation did. I was changing farms and put next to zero time in on -
      though I had been moved to find a new farm because of some of those
      energies where uncomfortable - but thats not a tomato story.

      Your observation that the sunshine is effectively different may not
      have to do with the sun or the atmosphere but the earth's magnetic
      fields there on the east coast.
      In academia there is a debate over whether we are rapidly approaching a
      magnetic reversal and whether the over all field is changing or failing
      or just chopped up and moving rapidly all over.
      The strength at the poles has decline ~7% for a hundred plus years.
      The point being in terms of solar radiation is that there are pools of
      magnetic flux moving around the planet more and more. These pools repel
      or attract the solar particles i.e. radiations.

      Now not to be overly reductionist we can add atmosphere thinning from
      the UV spectrum's view. As well as noting that Sol is under going a
      very rapid evolutionary phase and in doing so has been adding rather
      heavier particles to the heliosphere.

      Ah the Joys of an active universe!
      Life is interesting and I'm full of it!

      In Love & Light
      Markess

      > Allan,
      > As far as I know, we have the first ripe tomatoes in this area
      > (Western Long Island), and as we ate tomato sandwiches for lunch
      > today, I
      > commented to m'lady that the tomatoes were orange! (on the outside, red
      > within). Only exception are the Cherokee Blacks which are as peculiar
      > looking as usual.
      > And as a gardener for thirty five years, I've been saying for
      > at
      > least the last ten that the sun is different. It is unforgiving, and
      > this
      > year is harsher than ever. Even plants with damp feet, well-mulched and
      > growing in soil rich with organic material, wilt down during the day
      > and
      > revive at dusk. One tomato plant inexplicably wilted entirely away
      > one day
      > in a few hours and never got over it.
      > It's creepy. dylan
      >
      >
      >> I didn't mention: my tomatoes are ripening to ORANGE, not red, in most
      > cases.
      >>
      >> This is happening to other farmers, as well, only their tomatoes
      >> taste like shit.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gloria C. Baikauskas
      Two things: The problem with the brassicas is most likely a boron deficiency. Tomatoes in their natural habitat grow in the shade. They also tend to ripen in
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 15, 2005
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        Two things: The problem with the brassicas is most likely a boron
        deficiency.

        Tomatoes in their natural habitat grow in the shade. They also tend to
        ripen in the dark. Maybe tomatoes having this problem will benefit
        from some sunshade...like the camouflage netting found sometimes in
        what here in the US are Army/Navy stores. I am using an old sun
        umbrella from my old picnic table for mine at the moment. I only
        planted 3 plants this year because I knew it was going to be a problem
        here with what I felt was going to be a drought year...which turned out
        to be correct.

        Gloria, Texas
      • Anders Skarlind
        Gloria, similar views were raised on bdnow too. I just wanted to forward a perspective not too common on this list. There is no consensus on bdnow presently on
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 15, 2005
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          Gloria,
          similar views were raised on bdnow too. I just wanted to forward a
          perspective not too common on this list. There is no consensus on bdnow
          presently on these issues.
          However that growing in the shades is natural for tomatoes may not have
          been mentioned and that is interesting. I will forward your post.
          Here in Sweden tomatoes need sun, or maybe rather they need heat, or rather
          they are not natural here. I don't grow tomatoes. Might start to grow a few
          plants again sometime. However sunripened tomatoes is considered quality here.
          Anders

          At 19:37 2005-08-15, you wrote:
          >Two things: The problem with the brassicas is most likely a boron
          >deficiency.
          >
          >Tomatoes in their natural habitat grow in the shade. They also tend to
          >ripen in the dark. Maybe tomatoes having this problem will benefit
          >from some sunshade...like the camouflage netting found sometimes in
          >what here in the US are Army/Navy stores. I am using an old sun
          >umbrella from my old picnic table for mine at the moment. I only
          >planted 3 plants this year because I knew it was going to be a problem
          >here with what I felt was going to be a drought year...which turned out
          >to be correct.
          >
          >Gloria, Texas
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
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