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  • irene@trilliumwoods.com
    Hello, All -- I have recently joined this group in hopes of learning more about Fukuoka s farming methods. I read about him many years ago but don t remember
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 28, 2005
      Hello, All --

      I have recently joined this group in hopes of learning more about
      Fukuoka's farming methods. I read about him many years ago but don't
      remember much of anything specific about his methods. Do I remember
      rightly that he uses a no-till method and seed directly into fields of
      clover?

      I'm not a farmer, just a home gardener, but as a near-vegan I am eager
      to grow as much high-quality food as I can. I'd be grateful for any
      links anyone could point me to.

      Many thanks,

      irene bensinger, in rural western washington state, usa



      Luminous beings are we.
      -- Yoda
    • John Warner
      Hello Irene, Welcome to the list. You are correct about no-till and he does seed directly into the sutbble of the previous crop. You may be interested in my
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 28, 2005
        Hello Irene,

        Welcome to the list. You are correct about no-till and he does seed directly into the sutbble of the previous crop. You may be interested in my website, www.wholesystemsag.org, where I mention Mr. Fukuoka at least a couple of times but it would be a very, very big stretch to say I used much of his methodology. What I like is his philosophy particularly as overstated in his urgings that we become "know-nothing, do-nothing farmers". More of the latter is addressed on my website.

        What I do does have some resemblence to what Emelia Hazlip [sp?] was doing but I heard that Fukuoka, after seeing a vidio of her work [or perhaps he visited her when he went to Europe], was astonished that she claimed to be a follower of his. [She apprenticed with him in Japan].

        Our little farm, using hand-scale no-tillage methods, has completely supported two adults for nearly 10 years and has added substantially to the income of an extended family. I think that few could match that claim.

        Please enjoy our Whole Systems Agriculture website and very good wishes to you and everyone on the Fukuoka list.

        John Warner, Madera Whole Systems Agriculture near Fresno, California
        Market growers of flowers and vegetables since 1996
        www.wholesystemsag.org


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: irene@...
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2005 8:51 AM
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Intro


        Hello, All --

        I have recently joined this group in hopes of learning more about
        Fukuoka's farming methods. I read about him many years ago but don't
        remember much of anything specific about his methods. Do I remember
        rightly that he uses a no-till method and seed directly into fields of
        clover?

        I'm not a farmer, just a home gardener, but as a near-vegan I am eager
        to grow as much high-quality food as I can. I'd be grateful for any
        links anyone could point me to.

        Many thanks,

        irene bensinger, in rural western washington state, usa



        Luminous beings are we.
        -- Yoda





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      • Malika
        Hi Irene, welcome! did you discover the Fukuoka Farming website yet? You can find it at Also the archives and files section of this
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 28, 2005
          Hi Irene, welcome!

          did you discover the Fukuoka Farming website yet?
          You can find it at <www.larryhaftl.com/ffo>

          Also the archives and files section of this yahoo-group are a good
          source of information.

          Happy reading, & happy gardening,
          Malika, in The Netherlands
        • irene@trilliumwoods.com
          ... Hello, John, and thank you for the welcome. I have been reading your website with great interest and find that my gardening techniques are not very
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 28, 2005
            John Warner wrote:

            > Hello Irene,
            >
            > Welcome to the list.  You are correct about no-till and he does seed
            > directly into the stubble of the previous crop.  You may be interested
            > in my website, www.wholesystemsag.org

            Hello, John, and thank you for the welcome. I have been reading your
            website with great interest and find that my gardening techniques are
            not very different from yours. A major difference is our respective
            climates: your Mediterranean environment vs my almost-rain-forest
            conditions.

            Until I moved here I always mulched heavily, having read Ruth Stout
            years ago. But here mulch creates ideal habitat for the several
            varieties of slugs which infest the woods surrounding our homestead and
            which can and will mow down a complete bed of seedlings/transplants
            overnight. I use non-toxic slug bait which works well, but isn't 100%
            effective, so I usually only apply mulch once our warm, rainless summer
            months (mid-June to mid-September) have arrived. The slugs are also the
            reason why direct seeding is so iffy. A tiny emerging seedling hasn't a
            chance against a hungry slug.

            I tilled just once in order to make forming the mounds possible, but
            now only use a U-bar or a spading fork to loosen the soil if it has
            become glazed or compacted. I know a permanent mulch would make even
            this amount of soil strata disruption unnecessary, but there just isn't
            any getting around the problem of the slugs. They are also the reason
            that it isn't possible to put all the spent garden material into the
            'alleys'. So instead I grow yellow clover in the paths among my raised
            mound planting beds and harvest it frequently to feed to the hens and
            the compost bins until it's time to start putting it under the
            plantings. I also have alfalfa growing at the corners of several mounds
            and harvest it frequently.

            I fertilize with rock powders, compost, kelp meal, and manure from our
            farm animals. I compost some of the manure, but don't hesistate to put
            uncomposted llama or sheep manure directly on the beds planted to green
            manure crops to overwinter. We compost large piles of donkey manure
            mixed with shredded bark and use it around landscaping plants.

            I've recently discovered that bindweed has crept in under cover of
            sheet composting in a new garden area and I'm desperate to get it all
            out before it takes over. Do you think that growing it up a stick and
            then 'petting' it with a rubber gloved hand dipped in Roundup would
            kill it to the root?

            Thank you for taking the time to read all the way through this, and
            thank you for all the excellent material on your website.

            irene
          • Gloria C. Baikauskas
            I did some experimenting with slugs and pillbugs which will both voraciously eat new plants. I found that by sheet composting on top of the mulch I had no
            Message 5 of 12 , Jul 29, 2005
              I did some experimenting with slugs and pillbugs which will both
              voraciously eat new plants. I found that by sheet composting on top
              of the mulch I had no problems with them eating my plants. I used
              cabbage plants as bait, too. In one place I didn't sheet compost my
              kitchen scraps...in the other I did. Where I used the sheet
              composting...no problems whatsoever. Where I didn't...it was
              curtains for the cabbage plants. That continued to be so as the
              cabbage matured.

              On a sunny day 10% vinegar would work with a Tablespoon of orange, or
              citrus oil in it. You should have no need of RoundUp. That stuff
              will be a nightmare far into our future. Pulling it would
              work...though constantly cutting it off at the soil level...without a
              stub.....may also work. I am thinking that like most such weeds
              eventually...after a few times of cutting off its source of
              photosynthesis....it should give up and die.

              Gloria, Texas

              --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, irene@t... wrote:
              > John Warner wrote:
              >
              > > Hello Irene,
              > >
              > > Welcome to the list.  You are correct about no-till and he does
              seed
              > > directly into the stubble of the previous crop.  You may be
              interested
              > > in my website, www.wholesystemsag.org
              >
              > Hello, John, and thank you for the welcome. I have been reading
              your
              > website with great interest and find that my gardening techniques
              are
              > not very different from yours. A major difference is our respective
              > climates: your Mediterranean environment vs my almost-rain-forest
              > conditions.
              >
              > Until I moved here I always mulched heavily, having read Ruth Stout
              > years ago. But here mulch creates ideal habitat for the several
              > varieties of slugs which infest the woods surrounding our homestead
              and
              > which can and will mow down a complete bed of seedlings/transplants
              > overnight. I use non-toxic slug bait which works well, but isn't
              100%
              > effective, so I usually only apply mulch once our warm, rainless
              summer
              > months (mid-June to mid-September) have arrived. The slugs are also
              the
              > reason why direct seeding is so iffy. A tiny emerging seedling
              hasn't a
              > chance against a hungry slug.
              >
              > I tilled just once in order to make forming the mounds possible,
              but
              > now only use a U-bar or a spading fork to loosen the soil if it has
              > become glazed or compacted. I know a permanent mulch would make
              even
              > this amount of soil strata disruption unnecessary, but there just
              isn't
              > any getting around the problem of the slugs. They are also the
              reason
              > that it isn't possible to put all the spent garden material into
              the
              > 'alleys'. So instead I grow yellow clover in the paths among my
              raised
              > mound planting beds and harvest it frequently to feed to the hens
              and
              > the compost bins until it's time to start putting it under the
              > plantings. I also have alfalfa growing at the corners of several
              mounds
              > and harvest it frequently.
              >
              > I fertilize with rock powders, compost, kelp meal, and manure from
              our
              > farm animals. I compost some of the manure, but don't hesistate to
              put
              > uncomposted llama or sheep manure directly on the beds planted to
              green
              > manure crops to overwinter. We compost large piles of donkey manure
              > mixed with shredded bark and use it around landscaping plants.
              >
              > I've recently discovered that bindweed has crept in under cover of
              > sheet composting in a new garden area and I'm desperate to get it
              all
              > out before it takes over. Do you think that growing it up a stick
              and
              > then 'petting' it with a rubber gloved hand dipped in Roundup would
              > kill it to the root?
              >
              > Thank you for taking the time to read all the way through this, and
              > thank you for all the excellent material on your website.
              >
              > irene
            • irene@trilliumwoods.com
              Here s a pdf file http://www.pesticide.org/bindweed.html from Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides which details strategies for dealing with
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 4, 2005
                Here's a pdf file

                http://www.pesticide.org/bindweed.html

                from Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides which details
                strategies for dealing with Field Bindweed. I'm going to try all the
                suggested methods because I have never used any chemicals in my gardens
                and really DON'T want to use Roundup if there is any hope of another
                solution.

                irene
              • les landeck
                Hi Irene, Good site info. this Saturday we are going after a small but agresive stand of burmuda grass, talked about it today and will use carpet to break it
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 4, 2005
                  Hi Irene,

                  Good site info. this Saturday we are going after a small but agresive stand of burmuda grass, talked about it today and will use carpet to break it down will get some before and after pictures and send then to the site. i want you all to see the life that abounds and how their activity regenerates the soil, and restructures the soil. this is a long turm project may take a year or more allowing for germanation of as much seed as we can and recovering. it will be fun.

                  Les






                  irene@... wrote:Here's a pdf file

                  http://www.pesticide.org/bindweed.html

                  from Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides which details
                  strategies for dealing with Field Bindweed. I'm going to try all the
                  suggested methods because I have never used any chemicals in my gardens
                  and really DON'T want to use Roundup if there is any hope of another
                  solution.

                  irene





                  SPONSORED LINKS
                  Organic gardening Organic gardening magazine Organic gardening pest control Organic gardening supply Organic vegetable gardening Organic farming

                  ---------------------------------
                  YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


                  Visit your group "fukuoka_farming" on the web.

                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                  ---------------------------------





                  ---------------------------------
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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • michael
                  Make a pond of any size. Toads will come the year after. Thousands of tadpoles will mature in tiny toads. Tiny toads will spread through the area and become
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 23, 2005
                    Make a pond of any size. Toads will come the year after. Thousands of
                    tadpoles will mature in tiny toads. Tiny toads will spread through the
                    area and become big toads by eating slugs. It works. I did so 25 years
                    ago and still benefit. I occasionally find a tiny toad in our distant
                    prairie, looking for edible bugs.

                    On Jul 28, 2005, at 3:07 PM, irene@... wrote:

                    > but there just isn't
                    > any getting around the problem of the slugs.
                  • earthworks111
                    Hello to all, We have a small vineyard/nursery in upstate NY, US. We are gradually improving the soil using Fukuoka s methods for the most part. When I am
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jun 24 9:10 AM
                      Hello to all,

                      We have a small vineyard/nursery in upstate NY, US. We are gradually
                      improving the soil using Fukuoka's methods for the most part.

                      When I am mowing I leave the white Dutch and Crimson clovers to go to seed, they are rapidly gaining ground. The goal is to let them
                      basically take over as a ground cover and ultimately have the soil be self sustaining. I'm looking forward to parking the mower permanently.

                      Couple of questions.
                      (1) Do you folks have a supplier that you could recommend for White Dutch clover seed that isn't to expensive in larger quantities?

                      (2) Would anybody have a method that they could recommend for
                      harvesting seed from existing clover that is ready? I was wondering if there might be some kind of comb/rake thingy available somewhere.

                      That's about it for now. Very pleased to be here.

                      Peace to all,
                      David
                    • abhijit_100
                      Hello Friends, My name is Abhijit Deshpande from Pune, India. I am a small entrepreneur and currently run a small software company. I say currently because
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 27, 2012
                        Hello Friends,
                        My name is Abhijit Deshpande from Pune, India.
                        I am a small entrepreneur and 'currently' run a small software company. I say 'currently' because I have been doing a lot of things.
                        From 2008 to 2011 I had taken a sabbatical to pursue natural farming and have immensely enjoyed 3 years living with my wife and son on the farm.
                        We tried everything from natural enemies to bokashi to carborized rice hull.
                        With my first hand experience I would like to share my experiences and thoughts with all of you in natural and sustainable farming.

                        Regards
                        Abhijit D.
                      • Nandan Palaparambil
                        Welcome Abhijit.. Yes, would like to hear from you about your natural farming/living experiences Regards, Nandan ... From: abhijit_100
                        Message 11 of 12 , Dec 28, 2012
                          Welcome Abhijit..

                          Yes, would like to hear from you about your natural farming/living experiences

                          Regards,
                          Nandan

                          --- On Fri, 12/28/12, abhijit_100 <abhijit_100@...> wrote:

                          From: abhijit_100 <abhijit_100@...>
                          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Intro
                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Friday, December 28, 2012, 1:20 PM








                           









                          Hello Friends,

                          My name is Abhijit Deshpande from Pune, India.

                          I am a small entrepreneur and 'currently' run a small software company. I say 'currently' because I have been doing a lot of things.

                          From 2008 to 2011 I had taken a sabbatical to pursue natural farming and have immensely enjoyed 3 years living with my wife and son on the farm.

                          We tried everything from natural enemies to bokashi to carborized rice hull.

                          With my first hand experience I would like to share my experiences and thoughts with all of you in natural and sustainable farming.



                          Regards

                          Abhijit D.






















                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Marcos G.
                          ... Yeah, tell us more! -- Marcos Guglielmetti ▲ ... ▼ ((*J*)) www.musix.org.ar www.ovejafm.com www.softwarelibre.org.ar
                          Message 12 of 12 , Dec 28, 2012
                            On Friday 28 December 2012 04:50:20 abhijit_100 wrote:
                            > Hello Friends,
                            > My name is Abhijit Deshpande from Pune, India.
                            > I am a small entrepreneur and 'currently' run a small software company. I
                            > say 'currently' because I have been doing a lot of things. From 2008 to
                            > 2011 I had taken a sabbatical to pursue natural farming and have immensely
                            > enjoyed 3 years living with my wife and son on the farm. We tried
                            > everything from natural enemies to bokashi to carborized rice hull. With my
                            > first hand experience I would like to share my experiences and thoughts
                            > with all of you in natural and sustainable farming.
                            >
                            > Regards
                            > Abhijit D.

                            Yeah, tell us more!

                            --
                            Marcos Guglielmetti

                            :::::::::::::::::: M U S I X :::::::::::::::::::::

                            ((*J*))
                            www.musix.org.ar
                            www.ovejafm.com
                            www.softwarelibre.org.ar
                            _______________________________________________
                            Para encontrarte con activistas del movimiento social del software libre:
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                            "The beginning of the mistake is from growing meat for the king and wine for the church."
                            http://www.context.org/ICLIB/IC14/Fukuoka.htm
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