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cucurbaticin and compost

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  • Zack Domike
    Hello, This is not a pesticide, but a soil-booster. Emilia Hazelip would not have us distracted by these labor-intensive preparations, but Nettles, at least,
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 25, 2005
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      Hello,

      This is not a pesticide, but a soil-booster.

      Emilia Hazelip would not have us distracted by these
      labor-intensive preparations, but Nettles, at least,
      are much appreciated in the extremely labor-intensive
      Biodynamic Farming.

      Collect as many young nettles as you can, let them
      fade a little, then bury them in the ground. Isolate
      the plants from the soil with a layer of peat moss
      above and below. They must remain buried for one
      winter and summer. They are to be added in small
      amounts to the compost pile, Activated nettles affect
      silica processes . . . .

      Thanks to Rexresearch for the above.
      Zack
      Buffalo cucurbaticin on sqush summer
      From: "shebikes4" <shebikes4@...>
      > I would like to place a natural cucurbaticin on a
      > variety of different
      > crops this summer. Slam and Adios are impregnated
      > with buffalo gourd
      > root and carbaryl, but I think that I can grow or
      > find the buffalo
      > gourd and mix it up myself without the pesticide,
      > and apply it to
      > yellow lures every 10 meters in the field. Other
      > apparently good

      > Have you tried groing stinging nettles among the
      > curcurbitaes? It seems to work wonders over here in
      > Portugal at least. It keeps away any beetle and is
      > particularly efficient with cucumbers. We usually
      > also make a strong tea with the nettles when the
      > infestation is too strong.
      > Just a suggestion.
      > Good luck.
      > Elsa
      > http://www.mundo.iol.pt/monte.samoqueiro/beleza/
      ---------------------
      > stinging nettle sounds very interesting
      > also and fresh cut is very important.
      >
      > Les
      ------------------------

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    • Peter Legrove
      Hi!! Pollywog Thanks for the tip. --I just downloaded a copy of Franck s book, which is called Companion Planting , in english, from Soil and Health Library.
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 25, 2005
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        Hi!!
        Pollywog
        Thanks for the tip.
        --I just downloaded a copy of Franck's book, which is
        called
        "Companion Planting", in english, from Soil and Health
        Library. Lots of new material there,
        http://soilandhealth.org
        There is a lot of information about Nettles and how to
        make up the Nettle brew in this book, it is well worth
        a read.
        Peter

        --- Zack Domike <arcada888@...> wrote:
        > Hello,
        >
        > This is not a pesticide, but a soil-booster.
        >
        > Emilia Hazelip would not have us distracted by
        > these
        > labor-intensive preparations, but Nettles, at least,
        > are much appreciated in the extremely
        > labor-intensive
        > Biodynamic Farming.
        >
        > Collect as many young nettles as you can, let them
        > fade a little, then bury them in the ground. Isolate
        > the plants from the soil with a layer of peat moss
        > above and below. They must remain buried for one
        > winter and summer. They are to be added in small
        > amounts to the compost pile, Activated nettles
        > affect
        > silica processes . . . .
        >
        > Thanks to Rexresearch for the above.
        > Zack
        > Buffalo cucurbaticin on sqush summer
        > From: "shebikes4" <shebikes4@...>
        > > I would like to place a natural cucurbaticin on a
        > > variety of different
        > > crops this summer. Slam and Adios are impregnated
        > > with buffalo gourd
        > > root and carbaryl, but I think that I can grow or
        > > find the buffalo
        > > gourd and mix it up myself without the pesticide,
        > > and apply it to
        > > yellow lures every 10 meters in the field. Other
        > > apparently good
        >
        > > Have you tried groing stinging nettles among the
        > > curcurbitaes? It seems to work wonders over here
        > in
        > > Portugal at least. It keeps away any beetle and is
        > > particularly efficient with cucumbers. We usually
        > > also make a strong tea with the nettles when the
        > > infestation is too strong.
        > > Just a suggestion.
        > > Good luck.
        > > Elsa
        > > http://www.mundo.iol.pt/monte.samoqueiro/beleza/
        > ---------------------
        > > stinging nettle sounds very interesting
        > > also and fresh cut is very important.
        > >
        > > Les
        > ------------------------
        >
        > __________________________________________________
        > Do You Yahoo!?
        > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
        > protection around
        > http://mail.yahoo.com
        >



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      • pollywog
        ... Glad to have helped you find a good read! I feel indebted to Steve at Soil and Health, and to Keith at Journey to Forever, for all their work in keeping
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 26, 2005
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          ---
          Glad to have helped you find a good read! I feel indebted to Steve at
          Soil and Health, and to Keith at Journey to Forever, for all their
          work in keeping the good information easily available to us.

          I'm on my 3rd or 4th read of "Weeds, Gurdians of the Soil". I get more
          out of it each time I "crack" it. And, some of the material in the
          Social Critism library blows me right off my chair.

          I am utilizing nettle from all over the property here: eating it,
          drying some for medicine, putting plenty in the garden, chopping my
          nettle in place and leting it lie in situ. I do adore my nettle- and
          dock, and dandelion... <G>

          deb
          htt://www.intothecool.com

          In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Peter Legrove <plegrove@y...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi!!
          > Pollywog
          > Thanks for the tip.

          > There is a lot of information about Nettles and how to
          > make up the Nettle brew in this book, it is well worth
          > a read.
          > Peter
          >
          >
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