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Re: [fukuoka_farming] The Reality of biodiversity in the USA

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  • aaron comsia
    Mr. Zack, I wonder what you think about Fukuoka sensei s idea of planting daikon (japanese radish) in soil depleted areas, i.e. his experience in California
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 10, 2005
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      Mr. Zack,
      I wonder what you think about Fukuoka sensei's idea of
      planting daikon (japanese radish) in soil depleted
      areas, i.e. his experience in California (even though
      it is not a native species)?



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    • angela flynn
      Hello Everyone, Referring to Zack s concerns, I find this a difficult subject. I have been landscaping and organic farming for the last 15 years. Often I
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 13, 2005
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        Hello Everyone,

        Referring to Zack's concerns, I find this a difficult
        subject. I have been landscaping and organic farming
        for the last 15 years. Often I come across people who
        support native vs non natives. One of the arguments
        that I think JL Hudson espouses that makes sense to me
        is that humans are no different from other animals. A
        bird eats a seed and then disperses it. We are no
        different. On the other hand some plants are terribly
        invasive and there seems to be need for control. I
        hope that we are at the point where our knowledge can
        provide us with the insight to judge what should be
        controlled. Then again, on an entirely other hand,
        what may be considered an invasive unwanted plant may
        be a godsend (for lack of a better term) staring us in
        the face. In landscaping I find myself weeding out
        plants that are medicinal and nutritious to eat. If
        we were to start appreciating the use of invasive
        plants and start harvesting them for their use instead
        of tossing them into the compost pile maybe life might
        be a little easier. The craziest part of everything I
        see is that there is no time to do things right. I
        wonder where we ran out of time. I am in no way
        advocating the loss of native species. My topic is on
        the value of biodiverisity. I just wonder where our
        place is in the overalll scheme of things.

        ~ Angela Flynn


        Collective action accumulating from individual choices shapes the future. - Joe Sherman



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