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Re: more accidents

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  • pollywog
    ... I live in South Central Iowa, just a few miles from the Missouri line. Absolutely: corn, beans, tomatoes, all kinds of plants volunteer. I had one great
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 16, 2005
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      ---Hello, Forest! Great information in your post!

      I live in South Central Iowa, just a few miles from the Missouri line.
      Absolutely: corn, beans, tomatoes, all kinds of plants volunteer. I
      had one great summer with 5 brandywine tomatoes growing on the
      perimeter of my compost pile. Lovely plants, great 'maters! Scarlet
      Runner beans from a previous year's harvest grew all over a bronze
      fennel, and where I have fed escaped chukars their corn and black seed
      sunflower, we get quite a nice jungle. I have black seed Simpson
      lettuce outside my front door, and kale at the north corner of the house.

      Funny, the kale isn't spreading as much as I expected it too. It's
      pretty much got it's own little area, and doesn't stray from it's
      original planting spot very far at all. In three years, I'd say it's
      expansion isn't more than a foot or so in any direction. I found one
      plant about 15 feet away at the wood's edge one year, but it was
      critter-eaten before it got far past seedling stage.

      There is no "mulch" or protection where the birds are fed, I move each
      year's feeding area to bare ground. But, I believe the scratching,
      pecking, and "dirtbath" activity of the chukars certainly supplies any
      needed "tilling", for the seeds' purposes. <G>

      So, yes. In Iowa, there is certainly plenty of "volunteerism" in the
      plant world. <G> Glad to hear from you in this forum, btw. deb
      http://www.intothecool.com


      In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Forest Shomer <ziraat@o...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm told that in Iowa, even corn and beans will sometimes volunteer.
      > The pods or ears that land in some debris or mulch enjoy some
      > protection from winter freezing (the ones in the soil will rot), and
      > then sprout in spring when there is tilling or disturbance.
      >
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