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  • Carla OHarris
    Hello, My name is Carla O Harris and I am interested in Fukuoka s taoist farming techniques of working with nature permaculturally so it is very little work.
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 13, 2005
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      Hello,


      My name is Carla O'Harris and I am interested in Fukuoka's "taoist
      farming" techniques of working with nature permaculturally so it is
      very little work.

      I am an expert in the field of Norse Mythology, and am also a student
      of medieval heresies. The study of paradise narratives and their
      influence in history (including revolutionary narratives) is also
      very interesting to me.

      I just discovered a new word : "volunteer crop". What a fantastic
      word! A crop that wants to grow itself!! Isn't this in essence the
      idea behind Fukuoka's farming?




      Carla O'Harris
    • William Stocker
      Read seedballs.com William ... From: Carla OHarris To: Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2005 2:28 AM
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 13, 2005
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        Read seedballs.com
        William

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Carla OHarris" <beowulfrebel@...>
        To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2005 2:28 AM
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] intro


        >
        >
        >
        > Hello,
        >
        >
        > My name is Carla O'Harris and I am interested in Fukuoka's "taoist
        > farming" techniques of working with nature permaculturally so it is
        > very little work.
        >
        > I am an expert in the field of Norse Mythology, and am also a student
        > of medieval heresies. The study of paradise narratives and their
        > influence in history (including revolutionary narratives) is also
        > very interesting to me.
        >
        > I just discovered a new word : "volunteer crop". What a fantastic
        > word! A crop that wants to grow itself!! Isn't this in essence the
        > idea behind Fukuoka's farming?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Carla O'Harris
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • alice@am464.net
        Hi Carla, Welcome. I m a Quaker, we have a particular kind of paradise narrative - the traditional theological basis is that Christ has come again, and he
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 14, 2005
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          Hi Carla,

          Welcome. I'm a Quaker, we have a particular kind of paradise
          narrative - the traditional theological basis is that Christ has
          come again, and he leads us individually & collectively in
          building the Kingdom of Heaven, on earth - no "other" world.
          Quakers are related to other English Civil War (C17th) movements
          such as diggers and levellers who would plant commons for
          collective use etc.

          So Fukuoka's methods for me are part of building the heavenly
          abundance of food. I'm a PhD student in Environmental
          microbiology, and I am interested in the economics of inputs and
          outputs into farming systems: Fukuoka's methods seem very
          important in that respect.

          I agree about the volunteer crops. I'm just starting out with the
          Fukuoka method but I'm hoping that the seedballs I am putting
          down this year will set up a permanent garden, I plan to leave
          annuals to reseed themselves.

          I'm working with a small apple orchard plot. I have made
          seedballs with lots of edible plants in, everything that might
          grow in the climate (English Midlands) - lettuce & other greens,
          tomatoes, peas, beans, carrots, beet, courgettes, garlic, herbs
          and so on.

          Do you have a garden to learn with at the moment, Carla?

          Alice
        • Carla OHarris
          Hi Alice, I have always respected the Quakers, and am eager to learn more. The truth is I both do and don t have a garden to work in. I have some friends who
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 14, 2005
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            Hi Alice,

            I have always respected the Quakers, and am eager to learn more.

            The truth is I both do and don't have a garden to work in. I have
            some friends who let me use some of their land, but the problem is
            they hire 'gardeners' who come in and destroy most of what I do!
            Nevertheless, I have managed to get four avocado trees from seed to
            grow. They destroyed an apricot tree I got growing from seed, but I
            have another one growing where it's hard to get to. I was also
            pleased yesterday to see that carob seeds I had scattered years ago
            had begun to sprout -- there's a little, little carob tree growing! I
            also have a Valley Oak that's doing nicely.

            I had a "wild garden" going well for a while : fennel, potatoes,
            sorghum, millet, broccoli, pumpkin. It seemed to reseed itself well
            on its own -- all I did was dig up the soil at first (probably a
            mistake, interfering with the soil-organism), spread some mulch on
            it, and then scattered seed. It did well until the gardeners so
            habitually cut it back that the plants couldn't recover, and now it
            is all grass. The potatoes -- which I haven't harvested -- do seem to
            send up a sprout every year still, however. I wonder how long
            a "potato community" continues to grow on its own undisturbed.

            I am very interested in knowing how much acreage I would need to be
            self-sufficient to grow my own wheat, lentils, soybeans, and black
            beans. I am vegan, and so those grains/beans would be enough for me.
            Maybe some millet too.

            Does anyone here have any information on how much land that would
            take? It would be rad to envision grain/bean self-sufficiency. Is
            that possible using Fukuoka methods? I have a very small space, a
            little less than 1/3 of an acre.



            Carla O'Harris



            --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, alice@a... wrote:
            >
            > Hi Carla,
            >
            > Welcome. I'm a Quaker, we have a particular kind of paradise
            > narrative - the traditional theological basis is that Christ has
            > come again, and he leads us individually & collectively in
            > building the Kingdom of Heaven, on earth - no "other" world.
            > Quakers are related to other English Civil War (C17th) movements
            > such as diggers and levellers who would plant commons for
            > collective use etc.
            >
            > So Fukuoka's methods for me are part of building the heavenly
            > abundance of food. I'm a PhD student in Environmental
            > microbiology, and I am interested in the economics of inputs and
            > outputs into farming systems: Fukuoka's methods seem very
            > important in that respect.
            >
            > I agree about the volunteer crops. I'm just starting out with the
            > Fukuoka method but I'm hoping that the seedballs I am putting
            > down this year will set up a permanent garden, I plan to leave
            > annuals to reseed themselves.
            >
            > I'm working with a small apple orchard plot. I have made
            > seedballs with lots of edible plants in, everything that might
            > grow in the climate (English Midlands) - lettuce & other greens,
            > tomatoes, peas, beans, carrots, beet, courgettes, garlic, herbs
            > and so on.
            >
            > Do you have a garden to learn with at the moment, Carla?
            >
            > Alice
          • BT Benjaminson
            Carla, shalom from Israel, I am not yet so well versed in Fukuoka farming, I am just an ordinary permaculturist and sometime market gardener trying to grow
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 14, 2005
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              Carla, shalom from Israel,
              I am not yet so well versed in Fukuoka farming, I am just an ordinary
              permaculturist and sometime market gardener trying to grow food on a
              mountain.
              My short answer to your question about how much land it would take to feed
              yourself is: how's the soil? The deeper and more alive the soil, the less
              land you need.
              Other factors include the available water and the pattern of its
              availability, the available organic materials, patterns of sun and shade on
              the land, the temperatures, animal presence (both wild and domestic), your
              energies, the qualities of the seeds you have, etc.
              There is a book entitled "How to Grow more Vegetables on Less Land..." by
              John Jeavons. It covers biointensive growing that shares some
              characteristics with fukuoka. Forgive me if you already know about it.
              Anyway, because it hopes to enable people to eat well from less and less
              land, it includes some basic information on how much land it would take to
              feed a person. The growing of compost crops is included in the discussion so
              one could be enabled to become self sufficient for the ongoing fertility
              needs of the soil as well as for human food.
              I am interested in what you are posting. Please keep going. Your enthusiasm
              is very welcome!
              Bat-Tzion Benjaminson

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Carla OHarris" <beowulfrebel@...>
              To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 11:29 PM
              Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: intro


              >
              >
              >
              > Hi Alice,
              >
              > I have always respected the Quakers, and am eager to learn more.
              >
              > The truth is I both do and don't have a garden to work in. I have
              > some friends who let me use some of their land, but the problem is
              > they hire 'gardeners' who come in and destroy most of what I do!
              > Nevertheless, I have managed to get four avocado trees from seed to
              > grow. They destroyed an apricot tree I got growing from seed, but I
              > have another one growing where it's hard to get to. I was also
              > pleased yesterday to see that carob seeds I had scattered years ago
              > had begun to sprout -- there's a little, little carob tree growing! I
              > also have a Valley Oak that's doing nicely.
              >
              > I had a "wild garden" going well for a while : fennel, potatoes,
              > sorghum, millet, broccoli, pumpkin. It seemed to reseed itself well
              > on its own -- all I did was dig up the soil at first (probably a
              > mistake, interfering with the soil-organism), spread some mulch on
              > it, and then scattered seed. It did well until the gardeners so
              > habitually cut it back that the plants couldn't recover, and now it
              > is all grass. The potatoes -- which I haven't harvested -- do seem to
              > send up a sprout every year still, however. I wonder how long
              > a "potato community" continues to grow on its own undisturbed.
              >
              > I am very interested in knowing how much acreage I would need to be
              > self-sufficient to grow my own wheat, lentils, soybeans, and black
              > beans. I am vegan, and so those grains/beans would be enough for me.
              > Maybe some millet too.
              >
              > Does anyone here have any information on how much land that would
              > take? It would be rad to envision grain/bean self-sufficiency. Is
              > that possible using Fukuoka methods? I have a very small space, a
              > little less than 1/3 of an acre.
              >
              >
              >
              > Carla O'Harris
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, alice@a... wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Carla,
              > >
              > > Welcome. I'm a Quaker, we have a particular kind of paradise
              > > narrative - the traditional theological basis is that Christ has
              > > come again, and he leads us individually & collectively in
              > > building the Kingdom of Heaven, on earth - no "other" world.
              > > Quakers are related to other English Civil War (C17th) movements
              > > such as diggers and levellers who would plant commons for
              > > collective use etc.
              > >
              > > So Fukuoka's methods for me are part of building the heavenly
              > > abundance of food. I'm a PhD student in Environmental
              > > microbiology, and I am interested in the economics of inputs and
              > > outputs into farming systems: Fukuoka's methods seem very
              > > important in that respect.
              > >
              > > I agree about the volunteer crops. I'm just starting out with the
              > > Fukuoka method but I'm hoping that the seedballs I am putting
              > > down this year will set up a permanent garden, I plan to leave
              > > annuals to reseed themselves.
              > >
              > > I'm working with a small apple orchard plot. I have made
              > > seedballs with lots of edible plants in, everything that might
              > > grow in the climate (English Midlands) - lettuce & other greens,
              > > tomatoes, peas, beans, carrots, beet, courgettes, garlic, herbs
              > > and so on.
              > >
              > > Do you have a garden to learn with at the moment, Carla?
              > >
              > > Alice
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Carla OHarris
              Bat-Tzion Benjaminson, frith from Seattle, Thank you for your recommendation! I will check that book out! Carla ... ordinary ... to feed ... the less ... shade
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 15, 2005
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                Bat-Tzion Benjaminson, frith from Seattle,

                Thank you for your recommendation! I will check that book out!




                Carla




                --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, BT Benjaminson <btbenj@n...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Carla, shalom from Israel,
                > I am not yet so well versed in Fukuoka farming, I am just an
                ordinary
                > permaculturist and sometime market gardener trying to grow food on a
                > mountain.
                > My short answer to your question about how much land it would take
                to feed
                > yourself is: how's the soil? The deeper and more alive the soil,
                the less
                > land you need.
                > Other factors include the available water and the pattern of its
                > availability, the available organic materials, patterns of sun and
                shade on
                > the land, the temperatures, animal presence (both wild and
                domestic), your
                > energies, the qualities of the seeds you have, etc.
                > There is a book entitled "How to Grow more Vegetables on Less
                Land..." by
                > John Jeavons. It covers biointensive growing that shares some
                > characteristics with fukuoka. Forgive me if you already know about
                it.
                > Anyway, because it hopes to enable people to eat well from less and
                less
                > land, it includes some basic information on how much land it would
                take to
                > feed a person. The growing of compost crops is included in the
                discussion so
                > one could be enabled to become self sufficient for the ongoing
                fertility
                > needs of the soil as well as for human food.
                > I am interested in what you are posting. Please keep going. Your
                enthusiasm
                > is very welcome!
                > Bat-Tzion Benjaminson
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "Carla OHarris" <beowulfrebel@y...>
                > To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 11:29 PM
                > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: intro
                >
                >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Hi Alice,
                > >
                > > I have always respected the Quakers, and am eager to learn more.
                > >
                > > The truth is I both do and don't have a garden to work in. I have
                > > some friends who let me use some of their land, but the problem is
                > > they hire 'gardeners' who come in and destroy most of what I do!
                > > Nevertheless, I have managed to get four avocado trees from seed
                to
                > > grow. They destroyed an apricot tree I got growing from seed, but
                I
                > > have another one growing where it's hard to get to. I was also
                > > pleased yesterday to see that carob seeds I had scattered years
                ago
                > > had begun to sprout -- there's a little, little carob tree
                growing! I
                > > also have a Valley Oak that's doing nicely.
                > >
                > > I had a "wild garden" going well for a while : fennel, potatoes,
                > > sorghum, millet, broccoli, pumpkin. It seemed to reseed itself
                well
                > > on its own -- all I did was dig up the soil at first (probably a
                > > mistake, interfering with the soil-organism), spread some mulch on
                > > it, and then scattered seed. It did well until the gardeners so
                > > habitually cut it back that the plants couldn't recover, and now
                it
                > > is all grass. The potatoes -- which I haven't harvested -- do
                seem to
                > > send up a sprout every year still, however. I wonder how long
                > > a "potato community" continues to grow on its own undisturbed.
                > >
                > > I am very interested in knowing how much acreage I would need to
                be
                > > self-sufficient to grow my own wheat, lentils, soybeans, and black
                > > beans. I am vegan, and so those grains/beans would be enough for
                me.
                > > Maybe some millet too.
                > >
                > > Does anyone here have any information on how much land that would
                > > take? It would be rad to envision grain/bean self-sufficiency. Is
                > > that possible using Fukuoka methods? I have a very small space, a
                > > little less than 1/3 of an acre.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Carla O'Harris
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, alice@a... wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Hi Carla,
                > > >
                > > > Welcome. I'm a Quaker, we have a particular kind of paradise
                > > > narrative - the traditional theological basis is that Christ has
                > > > come again, and he leads us individually & collectively in
                > > > building the Kingdom of Heaven, on earth - no "other" world.
                > > > Quakers are related to other English Civil War (C17th) movements
                > > > such as diggers and levellers who would plant commons for
                > > > collective use etc.
                > > >
                > > > So Fukuoka's methods for me are part of building the heavenly
                > > > abundance of food. I'm a PhD student in Environmental
                > > > microbiology, and I am interested in the economics of inputs and
                > > > outputs into farming systems: Fukuoka's methods seem very
                > > > important in that respect.
                > > >
                > > > I agree about the volunteer crops. I'm just starting out with
                the
                > > > Fukuoka method but I'm hoping that the seedballs I am putting
                > > > down this year will set up a permanent garden, I plan to leave
                > > > annuals to reseed themselves.
                > > >
                > > > I'm working with a small apple orchard plot. I have made
                > > > seedballs with lots of edible plants in, everything that might
                > > > grow in the climate (English Midlands) - lettuce & other greens,
                > > > tomatoes, peas, beans, carrots, beet, courgettes, garlic, herbs
                > > > and so on.
                > > >
                > > > Do you have a garden to learn with at the moment, Carla?
                > > >
                > > > Alice
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
              • peladang2010
                hi! i m a city girl from kuala lumpur, capital city of malaysia and would like to eventually practice wholistic/organic farming. i was exposed to it more than
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 17, 2010
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                  hi! i'm a city girl from kuala lumpur, capital city of malaysia and would like to eventually practice wholistic/organic farming. i was exposed to it more than 15 years ago when i visited a farm in lamphun in chiangmai but have lost touch/contact with them. the farm was called bhan phun mai or thousand trees foundation. anyone who knows of this contact or can put me in contact with someone from msia or thailand who can help me would be much appreciated. thks!
                • James
                  Hello and welcome - the Rodale Institute has had a publication for over 30 years called the New Farm. You can find it online these days at:
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 18, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hello and welcome - the Rodale Institute has had a publication for over 30 years called the New Farm. You can find it online these days at:

                    http://www.rodaleinstitute.org/

                    There are many articles about natural and organic gardening/farming methods.

                    Another site has many links to useful information at:

                    http://attra.ncat.org/

                    Best wishes

                    Jim Snyder
                    Edmore, MI
                    http://farmersforasustainablefuture.ning.com/

                    --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "peladang2010" <cincailah@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > hi! i'm a city girl from kuala lumpur, capital city of malaysia and would like to eventually practice wholistic/organic farming. i was exposed to it more than 15 years ago when i visited a farm in lamphun in chiangmai but have lost touch/contact with them. the farm was called bhan phun mai or thousand trees foundation. anyone who knows of this contact or can put me in contact with someone from msia or thailand who can help me would be much appreciated. thks!
                    >
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