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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pruning + BD comment

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  • emilia
    hi sal & all, when branches from a tree are amputated an equivalent rootmasss die... pruning becomes a necessity if trees have been planted so close together
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 1, 2002
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      hi sal & all,
      when branches from a tree are amputated an equivalent rootmasss die...
      pruning becomes a necessity if trees have been planted so close together
      that the poor things have no choice but to grow in a vertical-narrow way
      looking for the sun, some trees will handle amputations "better" than
      others, but all suffer from this, since it reduces their main nutrition
      source (light & gasses) & each cut is an open door to infection & the passed
      on formula of covering the wund (with whatever recepee) is removing to the
      tree the one chance to desinfect itself wich is oxygen...

      if one has trees that had been pruned it is possible to modify the pruning
      (there are many fantaisistic cuts that expose the tree tronc to the sun
      which trees don't like it at all, giving them stress & fragilizing them to
      diseases) so u can progressivily remove less & less vegetation & allowding
      the branches to regain a hemispheric shape (or for the pear tree a bit
      pyramidal), giving time for the roots to develop proportionnally to the
      aerial mass.
      but if u have the trees too close together they won't ever develop their
      potential form...
      and the best time for pruning...if it has to be done: is while the
      vegetation is still growing, while is still green, before it becomes hard
      wood so that the circulating sap may heal quickly the cutted surface, why
      wait to let it to become wood if one already knows it's going to be removed?

      one of the various things that bother me about biodynamics is the negative
      moral value that has been given to human feces...i don't believe that
      composted human manure -once bacteorologically has been made safe-is going
      to harm the spiritual development of the people eating the food grown with
      that compost (for those that use compost still in their gardens...)
      another thing that perhaps could pass in the 19 century but not any longer,
      is the relating to the earth as the "passive-female-mother" that needs the
      energetic wakening up by the etheric-actif-male-force (thanks to plowing)...
      i feel that act more like a forceful rape than an understanding of soil's
      fertility.




      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "sal" <sals3@...>
      To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2002 11:02 PM
      Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] Pruning


      > Is there any way to prune a tree that has been pruned for years back to
      > a natural shape so u can stop pruning?
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: burt levy [mailto:redbudburt@...]
      > Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2002 8:15 AM
      > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pruning
      >
      >
      >
      > -I believe that Mr. Fukuoka would rather not prune,
      > and let the trees grow naturally. He believes that
      > trees left alone will only grow branches that are
      > needed and in a shape that is useful. I know that he
      > believes that once you prune a tree, that it throws
      > the tree out into a confused state. However if a tree
      > gets branches broken, and the tree starts to grow in
      > an unnatural condition, he then recomends pruning it
      > back into a natural shape.However isn't natural for
      > branches to break in the wild? In which case trees
      > have been responding to injuries since the begining.
      > In short the natural way may be to leave the trees
      > alone, unless an injury started a tree growing crossed branches, or
      > watersprouts and suckers etc.Rex Teague <DibbleGardens@...>
      > wrote:
      > > On 26 Feb 02, GLORIA BAIKAUSKAS wrote:
      > >
      > > > On one of my gardening lists we got into a
      > > discussion of pruning.
      > > > Where does Fukuoka stand on the issue of pruning?
      > > I would imagine he
      > > > would say to leave well enough alone.....do
      > > nothing principle. Please
      > > > comment here. Gloria
      > >
      > > My understanding is Fukuoka prunes initially for
      > > 'natural form' then
      > > lets it be. He discusses this extensively in "The
      > > Natural Way of
      > > Farming".
      > >
      > > Cheerio... Rex
      > >
      >
      >
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    • Rex Teague
      ... Just to clarify... for similar reasons I m not sufficiently uplifted by Steiner s concepts to call myself a biodynamic farmer/gardener. What I enjoy about
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 7, 2002
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        On 1 Mar 02, emilia wrote:

        > one of the various things that bother me about biodynamics is the
        > negative moral value that has been given to human feces...i don't
        > believe that composted human manure -once bacteorologically has been
        > made safe-is going to harm the spiritual development of the people
        > eating the food grown with that compost (for those that use compost
        > still in their gardens...) another thing that perhaps could pass in
        > the 19 century but not any longer, is the relating to the earth as the
        > "passive-female-mother" that needs the energetic wakening up by the
        > etheric-actif-male-force (thanks to plowing)... i feel that act more
        > like a forceful rape than an understanding of soil's fertility.

        Just to clarify... for similar reasons I'm not sufficiently uplifted by
        Steiner's concepts to call myself a biodynamic farmer/gardener. What
        I enjoy about the BDNow List is the eclectic range of topics discussed
        there, beyond the conservative interpretation of BD. For example
        agricultural radionics and recently Schauberger inspired copper/bronze
        garden tools:

        http://www.implementations.co.uk
        http://www.kupferspuren.at

        Cheerio... Rex
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