Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pruning

Expand Messages
  • Jenny & Bob
    Can you tell us what kind of tree??..this would be important to know. Trees don t all have the same ways of growing and/or responding to pruning. jenny harris
    Message 1 of 19 , Feb 28 5:39 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Can you tell us what kind of tree??..this would be important to know.
      Trees don't all have the same ways of growing and/or responding to pruning.

      jenny harris


      > Is there any way to prune a tree that has been pruned for years back to
      > a natural shape so u can stop pruning?
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: burt levy [mailto:redbudburt@...]
      > Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2002 8:15 AM
      > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pruning
      >
      >
      >
      > -I believe that Mr. Fukuoka would rather not prune,
      > and let the trees grow naturally. He believes that
      > trees left alone will only grow branches that are
      > needed and in a shape that is useful. I know that he
      > believes that once you prune a tree, that it throws
      > the tree out into a confused state. However if a tree
      > gets branches broken, and the tree starts to grow in
      > an unnatural condition, he then recomends pruning it
      > back into a natural shape.However isn't natural for
      > branches to break in the wild? In which case trees
      > have been responding to injuries since the begining.
      > In short the natural way may be to leave the trees
      > alone, unless an injury started a tree growing crossed branches, or
      > watersprouts and suckers etc.Rex Teague <DibbleGardens@...>
      > wrote:
      >> On 26 Feb 02, GLORIA BAIKAUSKAS wrote:
      >>
      >> > On one of my gardening lists we got into a
      >> discussion of pruning.
      >> > Where does Fukuoka stand on the issue of pruning?
      >> I would imagine he
      >> > would say to leave well enough alone.....do
      >> nothing principle. Please
      >> > comment here. Gloria
      >>
      >> My understanding is Fukuoka prunes initially for
      >> 'natural form' then
      >> lets it be. He discusses this extensively in "The
      >> Natural Way of
      >> Farming".
      >>
      >> Cheerio... Rex
      >>
      >
      >
      > __________________________________________________
      > Do You Yahoo!?
      > Yahoo! Greetings - Send FREE e-cards for every occasion!
      > http://greetings.yahoo.com
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
    • Yugandhar S
      Fukuoka san writes about pruning and the natural form of trees in his books. To quote from the OSR: If a single new bud is snipped off a fruit tree with a
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Fukuoka san writes about pruning and the natural form of trees in his books.
        To quote from the OSR:

        "If a single new bud is snipped off a fruit tree with a pair of scissors,
        that may bring about disorder which cannot be undone. When growing according
        to the natural form, branches spread alternately from the trunk and the
        leaves receive sunlight uniformly. If this sequence is disrupted the
        branches come into conflict, lie one upon another and become tangled, and
        the leaves wither in the places where the sun cannot penetrate. Insect
        damage develops. If the tree is not pruned the following year more withered
        branches will appear."

        When animals in a forest break the branches intentionally for food like the
        elephant or unintentionally like a jumping monkey, will that also result in
        the unnatural forms and resultant problems? But, animals except man are
        assumed to behave according to natural laws and act in compliance. Then how
        do these acts of altering natural forms confirm to nature? Any thing or
        place untouched by humans seems so perfectly in balance for millions of
        years. I am missing something here.

        Just some passing thoughts. Comments welcome.

        Regards
        Yugandhar


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ruthie Aquino
        You have a point I I also thought the same thing when I first read it. You know I live in a country where pruning is as natural as breathing. Why not try
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          You have a point I I also thought the same thing when I first read it. You
          know I live in a country where pruning is as natural as breathing. Why not
          try pruning as if we were elephants or monkeys? Those animals rarely go
          around with a saw or secateurs. Just a thought. And no, I am not joking.
          best
          RUTHIE

          2011/6/23 Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...>

          > **
          >
          >
          > Fukuoka san writes about pruning and the natural form of trees in his
          > books.
          > To quote from the OSR:
          >
          > "If a single new bud is snipped off a fruit tree with a pair of scissors,
          > that may bring about disorder which cannot be undone. When growing
          > according
          > to the natural form, branches spread alternately from the trunk and the
          > leaves receive sunlight uniformly. If this sequence is disrupted the
          > branches come into conflict, lie one upon another and become tangled, and
          > the leaves wither in the places where the sun cannot penetrate. Insect
          > damage develops. If the tree is not pruned the following year more withered
          > branches will appear."
          >
          > When animals in a forest break the branches intentionally for food like the
          > elephant or unintentionally like a jumping monkey, will that also result in
          > the unnatural forms and resultant problems? But, animals except man are
          > assumed to behave according to natural laws and act in compliance. Then how
          > do these acts of altering natural forms confirm to nature? Any thing or
          > place untouched by humans seems so perfectly in balance for millions of
          > years. I am missing something here.
          >
          > Just some passing thoughts. Comments welcome.
          >
          > Regards
          > Yugandhar
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Troy Santos
          Is there a natural way for humans to live? It occurs to me to answer no. Seems to me that nature s laws apply to human behavior just as well as to any
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Is there a "natural way" for humans to live? It occurs to me to answer
            no. Seems to me that "nature's laws" apply to human behavior just as
            well as to any other action. What we do certainly has consequences.
            And, I wouldn't say that there are "laws" just consequences /
            responses to actions. It's all movement, isn't it? One thing begets
            another. Behavior begets consequences, which begets more consequences,
            and so on, with no end. There is no such thing as breaking nature's
            laws, just consequences from doing this and doing that. The cycle ...
            the wheel. Karma and the effects of karma. Cause and affect.

            Sometimes we humans say that we behave unnaturally. Then how SHOULD we
            behave? For example, if we habitually break "nature's laws" with
            respect to eating, then, what, we might get sick, right? The sickenss
            is a consequence. Same with wild animals. They sometimes get sick.

            I do say that we're pretty far out of touch with nature, so we live in
            haphazard ways, but still, we're just subject to nature's laws.

            When an animal breaks a branch from a tree ... I don't know, but I
            suppose that tree may very well develop in ways that a tree that has
            been pruned might develop. So maybe it won't develop in ways that it
            will never be "perfect". I wouldn't say that the resultant form of the
            tree is unnatural. What's so unnatural about an elephant breaking a
            branch, or a monkey jumping from a tree? And why should the form that
            the tree takes as a result be called unnatural? How can anything not
            be affected by EVERYthing else? Doesn't everything affect everything
            else, even though we are unaware of most everything that happens?

            To sum up all this, there is nothing natural or unnatural. Things
            happen ... that's all.

            Surely I'm also missing something. Help me see what I'm missing, please.

            One of the things I like most about Fukuoka-san is his emphasis on
            farming as a way for humans to become complete, perfect, or ... what
            is that quote of his? Love it.

            Smile ... no worries.
            Troy.


            On 23/06/2011, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...> wrote:
            > You have a point I I also thought the same thing when I first read it. You
            > know I live in a country where pruning is as natural as breathing. Why not
            > try pruning as if we were elephants or monkeys? Those animals rarely go
            > around with a saw or secateurs. Just a thought. And no, I am not joking.
            > best
            > RUTHIE
            >
            > 2011/6/23 Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...>
            >
            >> **
            >>
            >>
            >> Fukuoka san writes about pruning and the natural form of trees in his
            >> books.
            >> To quote from the OSR:
            >>
            >> "If a single new bud is snipped off a fruit tree with a pair of scissors,
            >> that may bring about disorder which cannot be undone. When growing
            >> according
            >> to the natural form, branches spread alternately from the trunk and the
            >> leaves receive sunlight uniformly. If this sequence is disrupted the
            >> branches come into conflict, lie one upon another and become tangled, and
            >> the leaves wither in the places where the sun cannot penetrate. Insect
            >> damage develops. If the tree is not pruned the following year more
            >> withered
            >> branches will appear."
            >>
            >> When animals in a forest break the branches intentionally for food like
            >> the
            >> elephant or unintentionally like a jumping monkey, will that also result
            >> in
            >> the unnatural forms and resultant problems? But, animals except man are
            >> assumed to behave according to natural laws and act in compliance. Then
            >> how
            >> do these acts of altering natural forms confirm to nature? Any thing or
            >> place untouched by humans seems so perfectly in balance for millions of
            >> years. I am missing something here.
            >>
            >> Just some passing thoughts. Comments welcome.
            >>
            >> Regards
            >> Yugandhar
            >>
            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Troy Santos
            Boy, I m really glad you asked this question. I ve recently made the decision to get more sensible with how I live my life. Want better consequences from my
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Boy, I'm really glad you asked this question. I've recently made the
              decision to get more sensible with how I live my life. Want "better"
              consequences from my actions.

              Thanks.

              On 23/06/2011, Troy Santos <troysantos@...> wrote:
              > Is there a "natural way" for humans to live? It occurs to me to answer
              > no. Seems to me that "nature's laws" apply to human behavior just as
              > well as to any other action. What we do certainly has consequences.
              > And, I wouldn't say that there are "laws" just consequences /
              > responses to actions. It's all movement, isn't it? One thing begets
              > another. Behavior begets consequences, which begets more consequences,
              > and so on, with no end. There is no such thing as breaking nature's
              > laws, just consequences from doing this and doing that. The cycle ...
              > the wheel. Karma and the effects of karma. Cause and affect.
              >
              > Sometimes we humans say that we behave unnaturally. Then how SHOULD we
              > behave? For example, if we habitually break "nature's laws" with
              > respect to eating, then, what, we might get sick, right? The sickenss
              > is a consequence. Same with wild animals. They sometimes get sick.
              >
              > I do say that we're pretty far out of touch with nature, so we live in
              > haphazard ways, but still, we're just subject to nature's laws.
              >
              > When an animal breaks a branch from a tree ... I don't know, but I
              > suppose that tree may very well develop in ways that a tree that has
              > been pruned might develop. So maybe it won't develop in ways that it
              > will never be "perfect". I wouldn't say that the resultant form of the
              > tree is unnatural. What's so unnatural about an elephant breaking a
              > branch, or a monkey jumping from a tree? And why should the form that
              > the tree takes as a result be called unnatural? How can anything not
              > be affected by EVERYthing else? Doesn't everything affect everything
              > else, even though we are unaware of most everything that happens?
              >
              > To sum up all this, there is nothing natural or unnatural. Things
              > happen ... that's all.
              >
              > Surely I'm also missing something. Help me see what I'm missing, please.
              >
              > One of the things I like most about Fukuoka-san is his emphasis on
              > farming as a way for humans to become complete, perfect, or ... what
              > is that quote of his? Love it.
              >
              > Smile ... no worries.
              > Troy.
              >
              >
              > On 23/06/2011, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...> wrote:
              >> You have a point I I also thought the same thing when I first read it.
              >> You
              >> know I live in a country where pruning is as natural as breathing. Why
              >> not
              >> try pruning as if we were elephants or monkeys? Those animals rarely go
              >> around with a saw or secateurs. Just a thought. And no, I am not
              >> joking.
              >> best
              >> RUTHIE
              >>
              >> 2011/6/23 Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...>
              >>
              >>> **
              >>>
              >>>
              >>> Fukuoka san writes about pruning and the natural form of trees in his
              >>> books.
              >>> To quote from the OSR:
              >>>
              >>> "If a single new bud is snipped off a fruit tree with a pair of
              >>> scissors,
              >>> that may bring about disorder which cannot be undone. When growing
              >>> according
              >>> to the natural form, branches spread alternately from the trunk and the
              >>> leaves receive sunlight uniformly. If this sequence is disrupted the
              >>> branches come into conflict, lie one upon another and become tangled,
              >>> and
              >>> the leaves wither in the places where the sun cannot penetrate. Insect
              >>> damage develops. If the tree is not pruned the following year more
              >>> withered
              >>> branches will appear."
              >>>
              >>> When animals in a forest break the branches intentionally for food like
              >>> the
              >>> elephant or unintentionally like a jumping monkey, will that also result
              >>> in
              >>> the unnatural forms and resultant problems? But, animals except man are
              >>> assumed to behave according to natural laws and act in compliance. Then
              >>> how
              >>> do these acts of altering natural forms confirm to nature? Any thing or
              >>> place untouched by humans seems so perfectly in balance for millions of
              >>> years. I am missing something here.
              >>>
              >>> Just some passing thoughts. Comments welcome.
              >>>
              >>> Regards
              >>> Yugandhar
              >>>
              >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>
              >>
              >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> ------------------------------------
              >>
              >> Yahoo! Groups Links
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
            • Sumant Joshi
              LOL. on the same lines, take a look at this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjmtSkl53h4 Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone Warm regards, Sumant Joshi Tel -
              Message 6 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                LOL. on the same lines, take a look at this video
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjmtSkl53h4


                Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone

                Warm regards,

                Sumant Joshi
                Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161

                --- On Thu, 23/6/11, Troy Santos <troysantos@...> wrote:

                From: Troy Santos <troysantos@...>
                Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pruning
                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, 23 June, 2011, 7:07 PM
















                 









                Boy, I'm really glad you asked this question. I've recently made the

                decision to get more sensible with how I live my life. Want "better"

                consequences from my actions.



                Thanks.



                On 23/06/2011, Troy Santos <troysantos@...> wrote:

                > Is there a "natural way" for humans to live? It occurs to me to answer

                > no. Seems to me that "nature's laws" apply to human behavior just as

                > well as to any other action. What we do certainly has consequences.

                > And, I wouldn't say that there are "laws" just consequences /

                > responses to actions. It's all movement, isn't it? One thing begets

                > another. Behavior begets consequences, which begets more consequences,

                > and so on, with no end. There is no such thing as breaking nature's

                > laws, just consequences from doing this and doing that. The cycle ...

                > the wheel. Karma and the effects of karma. Cause and affect.

                >

                > Sometimes we humans say that we behave unnaturally. Then how SHOULD we

                > behave? For example, if we habitually break "nature's laws" with

                > respect to eating, then, what, we might get sick, right? The sickenss

                > is a consequence. Same with wild animals. They sometimes get sick.

                >

                > I do say that we're pretty far out of touch with nature, so we live in

                > haphazard ways, but still, we're just subject to nature's laws.

                >

                > When an animal breaks a branch from a tree ... I don't know, but I

                > suppose that tree may very well develop in ways that a tree that has

                > been pruned might develop. So maybe it won't develop in ways that it

                > will never be "perfect". I wouldn't say that the resultant form of the

                > tree is unnatural. What's so unnatural about an elephant breaking a

                > branch, or a monkey jumping from a tree? And why should the form that

                > the tree takes as a result be called unnatural? How can anything not

                > be affected by EVERYthing else? Doesn't everything affect everything

                > else, even though we are unaware of most everything that happens?

                >

                > To sum up all this, there is nothing natural or unnatural. Things

                > happen ... that's all.

                >

                > Surely I'm also missing something. Help me see what I'm missing, please.

                >

                > One of the things I like most about Fukuoka-san is his emphasis on

                > farming as a way for humans to become complete, perfect, or ... what

                > is that quote of his? Love it.

                >

                > Smile ... no worries.

                > Troy.

                >

                >

                > On 23/06/2011, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...> wrote:

                >> You have a point I I also thought the same thing when I first read it.

                >> You

                >> know I live in a country where pruning is as natural as breathing. Why

                >> not

                >> try pruning as if we were elephants or monkeys? Those animals rarely go

                >> around with a saw or secateurs. Just a thought. And no, I am not

                >> joking.

                >> best

                >> RUTHIE

                >>

                >> 2011/6/23 Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...>

                >>

                >>> **

                >>>

                >>>

                >>> Fukuoka san writes about pruning and the natural form of trees in his

                >>> books.

                >>> To quote from the OSR:

                >>>

                >>> "If a single new bud is snipped off a fruit tree with a pair of

                >>> scissors,

                >>> that may bring about disorder which cannot be undone. When growing

                >>> according

                >>> to the natural form, branches spread alternately from the trunk and the

                >>> leaves receive sunlight uniformly. If this sequence is disrupted the

                >>> branches come into conflict, lie one upon another and become tangled,

                >>> and

                >>> the leaves wither in the places where the sun cannot penetrate. Insect

                >>> damage develops. If the tree is not pruned the following year more

                >>> withered

                >>> branches will appear."

                >>>

                >>> When animals in a forest break the branches intentionally for food like

                >>> the

                >>> elephant or unintentionally like a jumping monkey, will that also result

                >>> in

                >>> the unnatural forms and resultant problems? But, animals except man are

                >>> assumed to behave according to natural laws and act in compliance. Then

                >>> how

                >>> do these acts of altering natural forms confirm to nature? Any thing or

                >>> place untouched by humans seems so perfectly in balance for millions of

                >>> years. I am missing something here.

                >>>

                >>> Just some passing thoughts. Comments welcome.

                >>>

                >>> Regards

                >>> Yugandhar

                >>>

                >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                >>>

                >>>

                >>>

                >>

                >>

                >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                >>

                >>

                >>

                >> ------------------------------------

                >>

                >> Yahoo! Groups Links

                >>

                >>

                >>

                >>

                >

























                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Boovarahan Srinivasan
                The moment we interfere in the name of cultivation , naturalness ends. Only the degree of artificiality matters. Boovarahan S Chennai. 09962662717 (Vodafone) ,
                Message 7 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  The moment we interfere in the name of cultivation , naturalness ends. Only
                  the degree of artificiality matters.

                  Boovarahan S
                  Chennai.
                  09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Daniel
                  I can only speak of my own limited experience. But it is very interesting nonetheless, I think. I have seen many grafted Jackfruit trees here in Thailand. None
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I can only speak of my own limited experience. But it is very interesting nonetheless, I think.

                    I have seen many grafted Jackfruit trees here in Thailand. None of them exhibited natural growth. The branches were growing all over the place; the trees looked very unstable (and unhealthy) and heavy fruits were carried far from the main stem on lateral branches that often break under their weight.
                    I have also seen many Jackfruit trees that were planted from seed, and were never pruned. When not yet so old (15 years or so), they have a typical cone-shape (tall and quite narrow) with a very clearly defined central leader. And all fruit only grows on this main central stem. Being a physics teacher, I immediately so the wisdom of the tree for doing this. Keeping heavy fruits on the central leader makes sure the tree remains very stable.
                    Very old trees I saw in the forest seem to lose this clear cone-shape though.

                    I also planted quite a few natural Jackfruit seedlings myself. One day I was cutting a bunch of bananas nearby, and unfortunately a big banana leaf fell on my seedling and nipped off the still fragile top of the central leader. The tree was about 2 m high at that time. I thought, "Oh no, that's it. The tree's natural shape is gone forever."
                    But to my amazement, one new bud erupted near the top of the broken central leader branch, and continued to develop into the new central leader.
                    From my studies in Biology and Fukuoka's work, I thought this was impossible. But by next year, I could barely recognize the original break, and the tree continued to develop its natural form.

                    I think the true form of a Jackfruit tree may be "remembered" by the whole tree, as long as the tree is grown from seed with undisturbed taproots (direct seeding). This was just one observation... I hope others have more information to add.

                    Daniel




                    --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Fukuoka san writes about pruning and the natural form of trees in his books.
                    > To quote from the OSR:
                    >
                    > "If a single new bud is snipped off a fruit tree with a pair of scissors,
                    > that may bring about disorder which cannot be undone. When growing according
                    > to the natural form, branches spread alternately from the trunk and the
                    > leaves receive sunlight uniformly. If this sequence is disrupted the
                    > branches come into conflict, lie one upon another and become tangled, and
                    > the leaves wither in the places where the sun cannot penetrate. Insect
                    > damage develops. If the tree is not pruned the following year more withered
                    > branches will appear."
                    >
                    > When animals in a forest break the branches intentionally for food like the
                    > elephant or unintentionally like a jumping monkey, will that also result in
                    > the unnatural forms and resultant problems? But, animals except man are
                    > assumed to behave according to natural laws and act in compliance. Then how
                    > do these acts of altering natural forms confirm to nature? Any thing or
                    > place untouched by humans seems so perfectly in balance for millions of
                    > years. I am missing something here.
                    >
                    > Just some passing thoughts. Comments welcome.
                    >
                    > Regards
                    > Yugandhar
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Boovarahan Srinivasan
                    That s nice. That means nature has a built in mechanism to guard the tree growth from inadvertant accidents , but what about the man made intentional cuttings
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      That's nice. That means nature has a built in mechanism to guard the tree
                      growth from inadvertant accidents , but what about the man made intentional
                      cuttings and prunings ?

                      On Thu, Jun 23, 2011 at 7:35 PM, Daniel <dfjager@...> wrote:

                      > **
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I can only speak of my own limited experience. But it is very interesting
                      > nonetheless, I think.
                      >
                      > I have seen many grafted Jackfruit trees here in Thailand. None of them
                      > exhibited natural growth. The branches were growing all over the place; the
                      > trees looked very unstable (and unhealthy) and heavy fruits were carried far
                      > from the main stem on lateral branches that often break under their weight.
                      > I have also seen many Jackfruit trees that were planted from seed, and were
                      > never pruned. When not yet so old (15 years or so), they have a typical
                      > cone-shape (tall and quite narrow) with a very clearly defined central
                      > leader. And all fruit only grows on this main central stem. Being a physics
                      > teacher, I immediately so the wisdom of the tree for doing this. Keeping
                      > heavy fruits on the central leader makes sure the tree remains very stable.
                      > Very old trees I saw in the forest seem to lose this clear cone-shape
                      > though.
                      >
                      > I also planted quite a few natural Jackfruit seedlings myself. One day I
                      > was cutting a bunch of bananas nearby, and unfortunately a big banana leaf
                      > fell on my seedling and nipped off the still fragile top of the central
                      > leader. The tree was about 2 m high at that time. I thought, "Oh no, that's
                      > it. The tree's natural shape is gone forever."
                      > But to my amazement, one new bud erupted near the top of the broken central
                      > leader branch, and continued to develop into the new central leader.
                      > From my studies in Biology and Fukuoka's work, I thought this was
                      > impossible. But by next year, I could barely recognize the original break,
                      > and the tree continued to develop its natural form.
                      >
                      > I think the true form of a Jackfruit tree may be "remembered" by the whole
                      > tree, as long as the tree is grown from seed with undisturbed taproots
                      > (direct seeding). This was just one observation... I hope others have more
                      > information to add.
                      >
                      > Daniel
                      >


                      > Boovarahan S
                      >
                      Chennai.
                      09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Ruthie Aquino
                      Boovarahanji, Sumantji, Daniel, Troy, and all, I think in this group we have found a person, Mr. Fukuoka, whose life work inspires us. In my case, he inspires
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Boovarahanji, Sumantji, Daniel, Troy, and all,
                        I think in this group we have found a person, Mr. Fukuoka, whose life work
                        inspires us. In my case, he inspires me because he seems nearly perfectly
                        happy with his lifestyle while deeply respecting all other living things
                        around him. He does not promise riches or popularity. He promises
                        nothing. He just lived his happy, inspirational life.
                        What I also like is he opened a new door to me, that of non- or minimal
                        intervention on nature. Just like a little girl to whom he is saying, just
                        wait and see, it's magical, it works all by itself.
                        I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Indian publisher Other
                        India Press who made the One Straw Revolution available to me at a low price
                        despite the good quality of the paper and the impeccable printing.
                        I wish it published his other books, too, so I could buy them at a similarly
                        low price.
                        best
                        RUTHIE




                        2011/6/23 Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>

                        > **
                        >
                        >
                        > That's nice. That means nature has a built in mechanism to guard the tree
                        > growth from inadvertant accidents , but what about the man made intentional
                        > cuttings and prunings ?
                        >
                        > On Thu, Jun 23, 2011 at 7:35 PM, Daniel <dfjager@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > **
                        >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I can only speak of my own limited experience. But it is very interesting
                        > > nonetheless, I think.
                        > >
                        > > I have seen many grafted Jackfruit trees here in Thailand. None of them
                        > > exhibited natural growth. The branches were growing all over the place;
                        > the
                        > > trees looked very unstable (and unhealthy) and heavy fruits were carried
                        > far
                        > > from the main stem on lateral branches that often break under their
                        > weight.
                        > > I have also seen many Jackfruit trees that were planted from seed, and
                        > were
                        > > never pruned. When not yet so old (15 years or so), they have a typical
                        > > cone-shape (tall and quite narrow) with a very clearly defined central
                        > > leader. And all fruit only grows on this main central stem. Being a
                        > physics
                        > > teacher, I immediately so the wisdom of the tree for doing this. Keeping
                        > > heavy fruits on the central leader makes sure the tree remains very
                        > stable.
                        > > Very old trees I saw in the forest seem to lose this clear cone-shape
                        > > though.
                        > >
                        > > I also planted quite a few natural Jackfruit seedlings myself. One day I
                        > > was cutting a bunch of bananas nearby, and unfortunately a big banana
                        > leaf
                        > > fell on my seedling and nipped off the still fragile top of the central
                        > > leader. The tree was about 2 m high at that time. I thought, "Oh no,
                        > that's
                        > > it. The tree's natural shape is gone forever."
                        > > But to my amazement, one new bud erupted near the top of the broken
                        > central
                        > > leader branch, and continued to develop into the new central leader.
                        > > From my studies in Biology and Fukuoka's work, I thought this was
                        > > impossible. But by next year, I could barely recognize the original
                        > break,
                        > > and the tree continued to develop its natural form.
                        > >
                        > > I think the true form of a Jackfruit tree may be "remembered" by the
                        > whole
                        > > tree, as long as the tree is grown from seed with undisturbed taproots
                        > > (direct seeding). This was just one observation... I hope others have
                        > more
                        > > information to add.
                        > >
                        > > Daniel
                        > >
                        >
                        > > Boovarahan S
                        > >
                        > Chennai.
                        > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Boovarahan Srinivasan
                        As said several times, natural farming is a part of being with nature. And it is not a profession but a way of life which one should enjoy at every moment. The
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jun 23, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          As said several times, natural farming is a part of being with nature. And
                          it is not a profession but a way of life which one should enjoy at every
                          moment. The moment you think of a balance sheet on farming , the charm is
                          lost for ever.
                          This is my personal view.

                          On Thu, Jun 23, 2011 at 9:11 PM, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...>wrote:

                          > Boovarahanji, Sumantji, Daniel, Troy, and all,
                          > I think in this group we have found a person, Mr. Fukuoka, whose life work
                          > inspires us. In my case, he inspires me because he seems nearly perfectly
                          > happy with his lifestyle while deeply respecting all other living things
                          > around him. He does not promise riches or popularity. He promises
                          > nothing. He just lived his happy, inspirational life.
                          > What I also like is he opened a new door to me, that of non- or minimal
                          > intervention on nature. Just like a little girl to whom he is saying, just
                          > wait and see, it's magical, it works all by itself.
                          > I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Indian publisher Other
                          > India Press who made the One Straw Revolution available to me at a low
                          > price
                          > despite the good quality of the paper and the impeccable printing.
                          > I wish it published his other books, too, so I could buy them at a
                          > similarly
                          > low price.
                          > best
                          > RUTHIEBoovarahan S
                          >
                          Chennai.
                          09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Daniel
                          Some more philosophy. For those familiar with Western philosophical thought: It may be that in Plato s realm of Ideas (as analogue perhaps the Spiritual Plane
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jun 24, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Some more philosophy.

                            For those familiar with Western philosophical thought: It may be that in Plato's realm of Ideas (as analogue perhaps the Spiritual Plane on which the "spirit" of a tree resides), every 'blueprint' or 'idea' of a tree may have a perfect shape. But down here on the planet, it is nigh on impossible for any living and growing thing to attain that truly perfect intended form, even if never touched by pruning hook and saw.
                            It is true though, I think, that the more we want to "correct" a tree, the more it will grow out of sync with its original "plan". I think this is what Fukuoka meant with his true shape of a tree. The more we tamper, the further we go astray. That said, I think it also means that we shouldn't expect perfection by "doing nothing". Things happen down here, yes, I agree wholeheartedly with that.

                            Daniel







                            --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > As said several times, natural farming is a part of being with nature. And
                            > it is not a profession but a way of life which one should enjoy at every
                            > moment. The moment you think of a balance sheet on farming , the charm is
                            > lost for ever.
                            > This is my personal view.
                            >
                            > On Thu, Jun 23, 2011 at 9:11 PM, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...>wrote:
                            >
                            > > Boovarahanji, Sumantji, Daniel, Troy, and all,
                            > > I think in this group we have found a person, Mr. Fukuoka, whose life work
                            > > inspires us. In my case, he inspires me because he seems nearly perfectly
                            > > happy with his lifestyle while deeply respecting all other living things
                            > > around him. He does not promise riches or popularity. He promises
                            > > nothing. He just lived his happy, inspirational life.
                            > > What I also like is he opened a new door to me, that of non- or minimal
                            > > intervention on nature. Just like a little girl to whom he is saying, just
                            > > wait and see, it's magical, it works all by itself.
                            > > I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Indian publisher Other
                            > > India Press who made the One Straw Revolution available to me at a low
                            > > price
                            > > despite the good quality of the paper and the impeccable printing.
                            > > I wish it published his other books, too, so I could buy them at a
                            > > similarly
                            > > low price.
                            > > best
                            > > RUTHIEBoovarahan S
                            > >
                            > Chennai.
                            > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                          • Yugandhar S
                            Dear All, Thanks for your valuable insights. Regards Yugandhar ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jul 19, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Dear All,
                              Thanks for your valuable insights.

                              Regards
                              Yugandhar

                              On Sat, Jun 25, 2011 at 10:55 AM, Daniel <dfjager@...> wrote:

                              > **
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Some more philosophy.
                              >
                              > For those familiar with Western philosophical thought: It may be that in
                              > Plato's realm of Ideas (as analogue perhaps the Spiritual Plane on which the
                              > "spirit" of a tree resides), every 'blueprint' or 'idea' of a tree may have
                              > a perfect shape. But down here on the planet, it is nigh on impossible for
                              > any living and growing thing to attain that truly perfect intended form,
                              > even if never touched by pruning hook and saw.
                              > It is true though, I think, that the more we want to "correct" a tree, the
                              > more it will grow out of sync with its original "plan". I think this is what
                              > Fukuoka meant with his true shape of a tree. The more we tamper, the further
                              > we go astray. That said, I think it also means that we shouldn't expect
                              > perfection by "doing nothing". Things happen down here, yes, I agree
                              > wholeheartedly with that.
                              >
                              > Daniel
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
                              > wrote:
                              > >
                              > > As said several times, natural farming is a part of being with nature.
                              > And
                              > > it is not a profession but a way of life which one should enjoy at every
                              > > moment. The moment you think of a balance sheet on farming , the charm is
                              > > lost for ever.
                              > > This is my personal view.
                              > >
                              > > On Thu, Jun 23, 2011 at 9:11 PM, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...>wrote:
                              >
                              > >
                              > > > Boovarahanji, Sumantji, Daniel, Troy, and all,
                              > > > I think in this group we have found a person, Mr. Fukuoka, whose life
                              > work
                              > > > inspires us. In my case, he inspires me because he seems nearly
                              > perfectly
                              > > > happy with his lifestyle while deeply respecting all other living
                              > things
                              > > > around him. He does not promise riches or popularity. He promises
                              > > > nothing. He just lived his happy, inspirational life.
                              > > > What I also like is he opened a new door to me, that of non- or minimal
                              > > > intervention on nature. Just like a little girl to whom he is saying,
                              > just
                              > > > wait and see, it's magical, it works all by itself.
                              > > > I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Indian publisher
                              > Other
                              > > > India Press who made the One Straw Revolution available to me at a low
                              > > > price
                              > > > despite the good quality of the paper and the impeccable printing.
                              > > > I wish it published his other books, too, so I could buy them at a
                              > > > similarly
                              > > > low price.
                              > > > best
                              > > > RUTHIEBoovarahan S
                              > > >
                              > > Chennai.
                              > > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              >
                              >
                              >


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.