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Re: maple tapping

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  • Forest Shomer
    Hello All, As a recently subscribed member I am enjoying the various discussion threads on this list. Two of these threads on which I wish to comment: MAPLE
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 2, 2005
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      Hello All,

      As a recently subscribed member I am enjoying the various discussion
      threads on this list. Two of these threads on which I wish to comment:

      MAPLE TAPPING

      Many years since I attempted to boil down Acer macrophyllum sap
      (Bigleaf or "Oregon" maple), but I recall that it took around 30%
      more cooking time to produce a stable sugary syrup (i.e., beyond the
      point of being likely to ferment) than it does with Acer saccharum
      (Sugar maple). Therefore, one would want to consider whether using
      A.macrophyllum warrants the amount of fuel involved.

      NUCLEAR OPTION

      >Sat, 1 Jan 2005 11:23:37 +0530 (IST)
      > From: aksharma@...
      >Subject: Organic mentality
      >
      > ...It is the mentality
      >and not the technology which decides the direction of development
      >(Atomic energy-both use destructive or constructive).

      I agree with your principle, but can't go along with your example. Witness:

      >Although the Kalpakkam facility escaped major damage, the fact that
      >30 inmates of the plant's residential complex nearby died and that
      >several of them were technical personnel or atomic scientists was
      >proof enough that planners never seriously considered the
      >possibility of a tsunami striking the Tamil Nadu coast...

      >The latest of these [protests against the Koodankulam atomic energy
      >plant in Tamil Nadu] was on Oct. 30, when Amritajnana Tapaswini, the
      >head of the well-regarded Santhigiri Ashram that maintains an
      >ayurvedic and spiritual center, nearby insisted on leading a
      >delegation into the high-security site to meet S K Agrawal, the
      >project director, and warn him of possible dangers.
      >
      >''You may be building this project at great cost in the name of
      >humanity and using high technology, but it is well to remember that
      >there are far higher forces in the world that you do not
      >understand,'' she warned Agrawal.
      >
      >--excerpted from:
      >Tsunami a Reminder of Risks that Plague Coastal Nuke Plants
      >by Ranjit Devraj
      >in: http://www.commondreams.org/headlines05/0101-01.htm

      There simply is no scenario in which the partial breaching of the
      seawater security wall around this site, and the resultant havoc, can
      be regarded as a justifiable trade-off for the nuclear power that it
      may yield. (And this is just one of dozens of such seacoast nuclear
      sites in India and elsewhere.)

      Isn't it ironic that the it took the unharnessed geophysical power of
      the tsunami to reveal the design flaw in the nuclear power plant?
      Rather, we could be tapping the immense power in ocean waves, tides,
      and thermal differentials as humanity's primary electrical (and
      hydrogen-fuel) power source, instead of the endlessly toxic and
      archaic sources of oil, gas and nuclear energies.

      LASTLY,
      I have an excellent photo of Fukuoka-san, in traditional clothing and
      holding a kama (sickle) from his three-day visit here on the Olympic
      Peninsula of Washington State, USA, in 1986. Since the Yahoo!Groups
      doesn't support attachments in the listserve mail, if anyone would
      like to view these, just write to me separately. (Your e-mail service
      will have to support attached files, obviously.)

      For the beauty of the Earth,

      Forest

      --
      Inside Passage Seeds and Native Plant Services
      Forest Shomer, owner
      Port Townsend, WA, USA
      ziraat@...
      www.insidepassageseeds.com

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • EinuIf
      ... There s no denying that Bigleaf Maple sap has less sugar in it, on average, than does Sugar Maple sap, but the concentrations are comparable. By one
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2005
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        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Forest Shomer <ziraat@o...> wrote:
        >
        ....
        > MAPLE TAPPING
        >
        > Many years since I attempted to boil down Acer macrophyllum sap
        > (Bigleaf or "Oregon" maple), but I recall that it took around 30%
        > more cooking time to produce a stable sugary syrup (i.e., beyond the
        > point of being likely to ferment) than it does with Acer saccharum
        > (Sugar maple). Therefore, one would want to consider whether using
        > A.macrophyllum warrants the amount of fuel involved.
        ....

        -------------------------

        There's no denying that Bigleaf Maple sap has less sugar in it, on
        average, than does Sugar Maple sap, but the concentrations are
        comparable.

        By one account (http://www.island.net/~maple/), the Bigleaf Maple
        averages 2% sugar, while the Sugar Maple averages a little under 3% .
        This might seem like a lot if one looks at it as the the Bigleaf
        having roughly 30% less sugar compared to the Sugar (or the Sugar
        having nearly 50% more, compared to the Bigleaf). Taking a broader
        view, though, the concentrations are most near to each other within
        the same order of magnitude; the Bigleaf's sugar concentration is just
        about on par with that of other eastern maples which are tapped back
        there besides the more favoured Sugar Maple; and there is even some
        overlap, with sweeter samples of Bigleaf Maple sap outdoing weaker
        samples of Sugar Maple sap.

        So the two species are in the same league, even though the Sugar Maple
        is at the top of the standings and the Bigleaf Maple is somewhere in
        the middle. It's not as though it took 10 times as much fuel to boil
        down Bigleaf Maple sap, or even twice as much. Given that, and given
        that the Bigleaf is the one we have on hand here in the west, I don't
        think the fuel needs really make a problem.
      • stonepylon
        Hi! I don t say much here, but I thought this might be useful to someone. You can concentrate the sugars not only by evaporation, which requires a lot of
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 5, 2005
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          Hi!

          I don't say much here, but I thought this might be useful to
          someone. You can concentrate the sugars not only by evaporation,
          which requires a lot of fuel, but also by freezing. If you have a
          freezer that you use all the time anyway, you might like to try it.

          Here is an article from Mother Earth News that tells how:
          http://www.motherearthnews.com/arc/4891/

          Happy sugaring!

          She.Rex
        • stonepylon
          Hi again! Just a couple more links and ideas. DIY Evaporator: http://www.motherearthnews.com/arc/5919/ Also try going to
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 5, 2005
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            Hi again!

            Just a couple more links and ideas.

            DIY Evaporator:
            http://www.motherearthnews.com/arc/5919/

            Also try going to http://www.motherearthnews.com/index.php?
            page=archindex and typing "maple" or "syrup" or "sugar" into the
            search box at top right (not on the left - that's the book search).

            I thought I read about a solar evaporator someone used to make
            molasses, but can't seem to find it. What about using the parabolic
            solar mechanism (usually used to make a solar stove) to concentrate
            heat and boil the syrup? With molasses-making, they use several
            metal trays in a line, evaporating the water out more in each tray,
            and sometimes maple syrup is made the same way. One could use a
            parabolic setup to heat each tray and perhaps speed the operation.
            There are many places on the internet to get clear instructions on
            making these parabolic setups at home, using cheap and available
            materials. I like http://solarcooking.org/ - under "Plans", click
            on "Parabolic Cookers".

            She.Rex
            http://www.stonepylon.com/garden/Why_Ecological_Gardening.html
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