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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Maple-tapping, revisited

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  • lucia@lrw.net
    ... ahhh. I understand now. great picture! ... looks like an interesting enterprise, but I couldn t find anything concrete on the website about the health
    Message 1 of 19 , Jan 2, 2005
      > No I don't tap the tree. I just hang bottles up on the trees branches.
      > It is hard to explain, I tried to draw some picture of it in Paint:
      > http://www.hot.ee/andre66/sap.jpg

      ahhh. I understand now. great picture!

      > The sap has health benefits, but I don't know excactly what are these
      > benefits. I have heard that it is good for immunity. In Karri Varpio's
      > mail is link about birch sap produce, on that page there are writen
      > some ingredients of this sap.

      looks like an interesting enterprise, but I couldn't find anything
      concrete on the website about the health benefits. they've written a book
      but it looks like it's only in Finnish. I'll search for something in
      English.

      thanks again!

      Lucia
    • EinuIf
      ... store [birch sap] ... I suspect that they sterilize the sap using ultraviolet light, ozone, or both -- the same way that chlorine-free tap-water treatment
      Message 2 of 19 , Jan 2, 2005
        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Karri Varpio"
        <karri.varpio@r...> wrote:
        >
        > http://www.aurinkolehto.fi/eng/index.htm has developed a method to
        store [birch sap]
        > without heating, but they keep their method as a secret.

        I suspect that they sterilize the sap using ultraviolet light, ozone,
        or both -- the same way that chlorine-free tap-water treatment is done.
      • lucia@lrw.net
        ok. I ve done some research on the net and some books such as Steve Brill s Edible and Medicinal Plants and found out that Black Birch/Sweet Birch/Betula
        Message 3 of 19 , Jan 2, 2005
          ok. I've done some research on the net and some books such as Steve
          Brill's "Edible and Medicinal Plants" and found out that Black Birch/Sweet
          Birch/Betula Lenta has alot of nutrients. the barch provides beta
          carotene, calcium, vitamins B1 and B2, calcium, copper, iron, manganese,
          phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and silicon, xylithol, betulinal and
          glucoside. the inner bark can be eaten raw, ground into flour, or added to
          soups. I haven't found out what nutrients the sap contains, but drinking
          it raw is better than boiling it down into a highly concentrated sugar.

          several people mention making a tea by infusing the twigs but warn against
          boiling which would drive off the volatile wintergreen oils.

          has anyone done this? do you just let it sit in cold water? or pour warm
          water over it and let it sit? or gently heat to warm?

          Lucia
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