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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Off Topic : Folk Tale from Mizoram

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  • Jonah L Pachuau
    Hello everybody! I was in touch with Michael Worham the other day and we were discussing the kind of traditional organic Farming as practiced in my state of
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 9, 2004
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      Hello everybody!

      I was in touch with Michael Worham the other day and we were discussing the kind of traditional organic Farming as practiced in my state of Mizoram (North East India) and somehow we got into the detail of seed ball technique of Mr. Fukuoka.

      As it so happens, we have a traditional folk tale that has an uncanny similarity with this system. As the story goes there were a pair of orphans called 'Liandova te unau' (Liandova brothers) who were poor orphans and had no means of livelyhood. Since they had no land or house, they earned their keep by helping farmers in their farms. (Farming was the only source of livelyhood)

      As orphan brothers could not afford to have their own farm, they 'invented' a method of hiding and storing grains of rice within clay marble sized pellets. During the sowing season, they would then 'shoot' these pellets containing rice grains into termite hills. (We have a traditional catapult shaped like a bow but using hardened clay pellets for ammo instead of arrows) Anyway the brothers would shoot their clay pellets (containing rice seeds) into termite hills and they would eventually get a bountiful harvest which could not be claimed by anybody.

      Although Fukuoka sans organic method is unknown to our people, I think 'Liandova brothers' in our folk tale could claim to be the original authors of the Seed ball technique. ;-)

      Anyway, Mike asked me to share this story

      Jonah L Pachuau






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    • roxann
      Thanks for sharing that story, Jonah, I like the resourcefulness of these brothers! Roxann [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 10, 2004
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        Thanks for sharing that story, Jonah, I like the resourcefulness of these brothers!

        Roxann




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      • pollywog
        ... I have heard recently that some native American nations (lower Great Lakes region, if I recall correctly) also utilized a type of seedball agriculture, but
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 13, 2004
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          ---Thank you for this!

          I have heard recently that some native American nations (lower Great
          Lakes region, if I recall correctly) also utilized a type of seedball
          agriculture, but have not been able to follow up and verify yet.

          Could it be one more instance of collective intelligence? Jung would
          be proud to hear of it! <G>

          No matter what, I appreciate the oral history being shared- thanks! deb

          In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Jonah L Pachuau"
          <jonahpach@h...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello everybody!
          >
          > I was in touch with Michael Worham the other day and we were
          discussing the kind of traditional organic Farming as practiced in my
          state of Mizoram (North East India) and somehow we got into the detail
          of seed ball technique of Mr. Fukuoka.
          >
          > As it so happens, we have a traditional folk tale that has an
          uncanny similarity with this system. As the story goes there were a
          pair of orphans called 'Liandova te unau' (Liandova brothers) who were
          poor orphans and had no means of livelyhood. Since they had no land or
          house, they earned their keep by helping farmers in their farms.
          (Farming was the only source of livelyhood)
          >
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