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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Question about permaculture books again

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  • Sergio Montinola
    Dear Michael, We are amused at your reply to William. We understand perfectly your concerns. But the Fukuoka sysem is only for those who own land and desire to
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 6, 2004
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      Dear Michael,

      We are amused at your reply to William. We understand
      perfectly your concerns. But the Fukuoka sysem is only
      for those who own land and desire to farm.

      There is enough land on this mother earth that have
      been abused and exploited. Fukuoka was a brave and
      determined man who offered a solution.

      We are Fukuoka's apostle. We follow and practice as
      much as possible. Either we believe in Fukuoka's
      principles and practices or we do not and continue
      with our ways.

      Hope this clarifies your doubts or questions.

      Serge Montinola
      Philippines


      --- michael <mdearing@...> wrote:

      > William,
      > What a bunch of gobbledy goop. I agree with you and
      > know what you are
      > saying, but it is of no help to most to be so short.
      > Explain the
      > process of understanding Fukuoka's message and
      > translating it to each
      > circumstance; except for the 'endless water' stuff.
      > Some do not have
      > the luxury of clay or skinny sand.
      > - michael
      >
      > On Oct 21, 2004, at 3:40 PM, William Stocker wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > Mannnel Iglesias, Oct.21.2004
      > >
      > > I do not know how you can separate fukuosa's
      > practice from his
      > > philosophy. It is my impression that you will
      > waist you're time if you
      > > do
      > > not first condition your soil with the seed ball
      > boogie. If you do not
      > > make
      > > a massive attack on the rich treasure bellow the
      > ploughshear, you will
      > > loose
      > > much effort.
      > >
      > > A seedball has about half manure crop and half
      > edible. most of the
      > > manure crop is also edible {beans and peas}.
      > Three outstanding manure
      > > plants are , Sucullus Chard, Rye grain, and Black
      > Wattle Acacia. Eat
      > > the '
      > > most delicious lower leaves of chard. It has
      > become my favorite
      > > green. Let
      > > it go to seed. Save the seeds.
      > >
      > > The first years crop will be sparce, if any.
      > Rest assured that
      > > the root
      > > brigade has been down there something like twenty
      > feet or more and has
      > > established channels of composted root and water.
      > >
      > > So, I ask you; what would you do if you were
      > a tomato or cabbage
      > > and
      > > suddenly found that delicious channel of composted
      > root and endless
      > > water,
      > > that you have not found for the last two hundred
      > years since the
      > > plowing
      > > began?
      > >
      > > The edible jungle of the seedball is already a
      > highly profitable
      > > farm.
      > > smaller retail stores will welcome a supplier with
      > "variety, in season,
      > > authentic flavored, natural, produce.
      > >
      > > Reference: fukuosafarmingol.net
      > >
      > > seedballs.net
      > >
      > > Trying to design a "Natural Farm' is a
      > contradiction in terms.
      > > Nature
      > > will teach you. William
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: "Leunam" <m.iglesias@...>
      > > To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 12:13 AM
      > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Question about
      > permaculture books
      > >
      > >
      > >>
      > >> Hello all, my name is Manuel, I'm trying to start
      > a market garden and
      > > farm,
      > >> and looking for a book about desing it. I know
      > perhaps this is not the
      > > ideal
      > >> list, but I've asked in two permacultures lists
      > and didn't get an
      > >> answer.
      > >>
      > >> My intention is to use Emilia Hazelip's ideas in
      > order to combine
      > >> natural
      > >> gardening with comercial garden, but now I'm
      > looking complementary
      > >> information (starting a mini-farm/market garden
      > from scratch) about
      > >> designing the whole place.
      > >>
      > >> Could you tell me witch books would suit me
      > better, for example the
      > >> designer's manual by Bill Mollison or The Earth
      > Care Manual by Patrick
      > >> Whitefield (or peharps another one).
      > >> The former I think is the clasical one, and the
      > latter is suposed to
      > >> be up
      > >> to date, but I have no idea.
      > >>
      > >> I live in Madrid (Spain) with a continental
      > climate, would anyone
      > >> kindly
      > >> sugest witch one is more appropriated for me?
      > >>
      > >> Thank you very much
      > >> Manuel Iglesias
      > >>
      > >> PD: Forgive my horrible english
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >




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