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Re: [fukuoka_farming]cutting vs. pulling weeds

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  • SArjuna@aol.com
    Cutting is OK for most weeds, but grass gets pulled in my garden, as the roots spread so terribly. I get them before they get deep, so I don t feel it
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 28, 2004
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      Cutting is OK for most weeds, but grass gets pulled in my garden, as the
      roots spread so terribly. I get them before they get deep, so I don't feel
      it disturbs the soil much. I do leave a lot of other deep-rooted
      non-invasive weeds. Cut their heads off before they can seed, though.
      The lovliest weed right now is a wild daisy or aster that has bloomed
      and bloomed. It is immense!
      Right now my garden is amazing to look at. One 5 foot wide bed looks
      like this: first corn and cucumbers and beans all together, with asparagus
      and raspberries leaning over them a bit. (The raspberries spread by runner
      into the asparagus. We took the berries out of 1/2 the asparagus, and left them
      in the other half, for comparison. Those berries doing way better than
      another area where it is just raspberries in strips with grass on each side.
      Think the grass gets all the nutrients. -You can tell how I feel about grass.)
      Then beans, tomatoes, okra, chard and a few peas and lettuce plants all
      together. Then strawberries with okra and nastrutiums. And lambs quarters and
      purslane wherever they came up, along with other various weeds but not too many.
      It is one solid mass of plants.
      I did plant the beans, etc. in rows, but very close together, so they
      form a solid cover, really. I started out planting bean by bean, following
      the 6 inch. staggered plan used in biointensive gardening. But it was too
      much trouble figuring out where each seed should go, so after a while I just
      planted rows 6 inches apart.
      I didn't intend to have tomatoes here and there, but they came up by
      themselves and after transplanting a few I just left the rest to see what
      happens.
      Now I will just have to remember where everything is, as the taller
      plants kinda hide the shorter ones. I just realized the other day that the chard
      is plenty big to start harvesting. I hadn't noticed it because it's between
      beans.
      We got a very late start this year in Wisconsin, USA due to most unusual
      weather. Too cold and rainy for a long time. A very hard year for
      farmers.
      Shivani


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