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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Perennial weeds and no-till

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  • Adam Carter
    Well said Gloria. That s exactly what I ve been thinking but hadn t voiced. Thanks.
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 10, 2004
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      Well said Gloria. That's exactly what I've been thinking but hadn't
      voiced.

      Thanks.


      On 10/07/2004, at 1:24 PM, Gloria C. Baikauskas wrote:

      > Why are any of you using RoundUP? Vinegar on a hot, sunny day will
      > do the job just as well....and it won't poison the soil....or you. I
      > am not saying to pour vinegar on the soil either. Spray it...or use
      > a paintbrush to get it on the leaves. Shading the grass/weeds works
      > to some extent depending on the grass, or the weed involved.
      > Pickling vinegar <10%> or 20% vinegar works the best. Add a wee bit
      > of citrus oil to it....and you have one powerhouse killer there. It
      > will kill anything it touches....so that is why I mention the
      > paintbrush technique. It keeps less of it from getting into the
      > soil...and directs it only where it is needed. Vinegar is cheaper
      > than RoundUp, too.
      >
      > I continue to wonder how anyone can be on a Natural Farming/Gardening
      > group and use RoundUP....from the giant enemy of all
      > agriculture...Monsanto. We are on...what is it now? RoundUP3? They
      > have to keep changing it....making it more powerful because it stops
      > working otherwise. RoundUp is not natural in any form.
      >
      > I know I am odd....but I don't think weeds are our enemies. I
      > continue to experiment with using weeds to help keep the garden
      > healthier, as well as more insect free. Sometimes it gets out of
      > hand.....but that is how I learn....as we all learn I suspect.
      >
      > Mother Nature seems to know when the soil needs this weed...or that
      > weed....though She doesn't see them as weeds....unwanted plants, like
      > we do. She knows when the garden needs something....even to the
      > point of having allelopathic plants do the job when She thinks it is
      > a good idea for only that one plant to be there.
      >
      > A lot of the above is from observation on my part. I have let all of
      > my beds go....let the weeds do their thing. Some of them I have
      > thinned out because I had to do it....but I cut them off at the soil
      > level. I want to see what happens from all of this. The one thing I
      > do know is that the same weeds/plants do not grow there the next
      > season. They could....they easily reseed themselves...but they
      > don't. Didn't anyone ever wonder why that is? It could be they do
      > regrow in the next season in some places....where their job wasn't
      > finished to Mom Nature's satisfaction. Time will tell.
      >
      > It just occurs to me that in Nature no one weeds....so how do things
      > grow so well? Isn't that what this list is about...mimicking Nature
      > ala Fukuoka?
      >
      > Entomologists will tell you that a neat garden has an imbalance
      > usually. Predator insects have no where to hide to do their jobs.
      > It is a bit like a hunter going out to hunt critters in a flashy
      > outfit with horns blaring. Wouldn't catch much would he/she?
      >
      > Natural Farming/Gardening is all about letting Nature do as much of
      > the work as is possible.....because it is the way it should be
      > done. I think some of you need to rethink what you are doing for
      > this reason. I know I may be out of line....and beg your
      > forgiveness, if I am....but I felt compelled to voice it.....and I
      > have.
      >
      > Gloria, Texas
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
      It just occurs to me that in Nature no one weeds....so how do things ... the principle of weed utility . GLoria , i apreciate your take on weeds . the first
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 10, 2004
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        It just occurs to me that in Nature no one weeds....so how do things
        > grow so well? Isn't that what this list is about...mimicking Nature
        > ala Fukuoka?

        the principle of weed utility .
        GLoria , i apreciate your take on weeds .

        the first step away from pure natural farming is to distinguish between
        weeds and crops .
        jean-claude
      • Lawrence F. London, Jr.
        ... Cut them down (scythe or sickle) let them lay and rot as mulch; do same with seedling weeds that appear later. Plant weeds that shade other weeds and/or
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 10, 2004
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          Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry wrote:
          > It just occurs to me that in Nature no one weeds....so how do things
          > > grow so well? Isn't that what this list is about...mimicking Nature
          > > ala Fukuoka?
          >
          > the principle of weed utility .
          > GLoria , i apreciate your take on weeds .
          >
          > the first step away from pure natural farming is to distinguish between

          > weeds

          Cut them down (scythe or sickle) let them lay and rot as mulch; do same with seedling
          weeds that appear later. Plant weeds that shade other weeds and/or are allelopathic;
          let them grow then cut them before they go to seeds, and lay and rot as mulch.
          You will soon be rid of your weed problem and richer soil with greater tilth and biological activity.
          Bermuda and Quack grass: dig it out or bury it deep; or till it then plant a weed that will out compete it.
          I've done all of the above and it all works.

          LL

          and crops .
          > jean-claude



          --
          L.F.London
          lfl@...
          http://market-farming.com
          http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech
        • SArjuna@aol.com
          ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 6, 2004
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            > A list of allelopathic plants includes oats and white clover, both of
            > which are recommended to grow to create mulch/nutrients for the garden. If
            > I plant these, will they release chemicals that will harm my vegetables next
            > time they grow in the same space?
            > Shivani




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