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Re: feeding the world population

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  • benonthenet
    ... find interesting: rather than hunt and gather materials that can be eaten directly, one hunts and gathers mulch material and uses that material to support
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 28, 2004
      > But I've got a new twist to hunting and gathering that readers may
      find interesting: rather than hunt and gather materials that can be
      eaten directly, one hunts and gathers mulch material and uses that
      material to support raised intensive beds. A thousand square feet of
      intensive bed will support one person, one year on a 2400 kcal/day
      diet.

      You can feed one person on less than 1,000 square feet. It all
      depends on what is planted.

      > A reader on this site may say, "Intensive beds! This is not
      natural farming! How impure."

      Cutting browse for goats and gardening intensive raised beds don't
      equate at all. Intensively raised beds only survive with tremendous
      input of water and materials from ecosystems outside of the garden.
      Otherwise you end up with diminishing ratios of organic mater and
      minerals in the soil.

      The whole point of intensive raised beds is to improve upon nature -
      to force the earth to produce more than it naturally would or could.
      There is no way that I know of to use natural farming in intensive
      raised beds.

      Intensive beds are not natural farming, however they do serve the
      purposes of producing food when space is very limited and recycling
      waste organic matter from homes and businesses. However, organic
      waste from homes and businesses can be surface composted in a natural
      farm/garden system as well.

      Natural farming may not produce the same quantity of food in the same
      area at intensively raised beds, but it does not affect any outside
      ecosystem like raised beds and is a heck of a lot LESS work to
      maintain. You could walk away from a natural farmer or natural garden
      for months on end and still have a perfectly functioning food system.
      The same can't be said of intensively raised beds.

      I suspect natural farming can produce more than most think. It
      probably all depends on what is planted and how the planting cycle is
      stacked.

      Benjamin
    • SArjuna@aol.com
      ... The kind of gardening taught by Jeasvons is not intensive but biointensive. Not the same thing. The whole point is that nothing is needed from
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 28, 2004
        In a message dated 6/28/04 6:18:53 PM, benonthenet@... writes:


        > Benjamon said
        >
        > "Cutting browse for goats and gardening intensive raised beds don't
        > equate at all. Intensively raised beds only survive with tremendous
        > input of water and materials from ecosystems outside of the garden.
        > Otherwise you end up with diminishing ratios of organic mater and
        > minerals in the soil."
        >
        The kind of gardening taught by Jeasvons is not intensive but
        biointensive. Not the same thing. The whole point is that nothing is needed from
        ecosystems outside the garden itself. You grow your own compost/mulch.
        Another thing that ought to be added, that I have not heard anyone
        talking about here, is humanure. Just what it sounds like. Only then are you
        putting back in what you take out. To think of our excrement as "waste" is
        just that.
        If you are doubtful, read the book Humanure.
        I live near Milwaukee, where tons of raw sewage is dumped into Lake
        Michigan every time we have much rain. (Which is very often, lately.) Now,
        THAT is disgusting.
        As the author of Hunanure points out, "there are two kinds of people -
        those who s--- in their drinking water and those who don't." Now who is more
        intelligent?
        Shivani




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