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Re: introduction and info

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  • Gloria C. Baikauskas
    Welcome Carlo! I don t know what the rest will say....but it is natural for a potato to grow below the ground. I would make a hole for it...and plant it.
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 22, 2004
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      Welcome Carlo! I don't know what the rest will say....but it is
      natural for a potato to grow below the ground. I would make a hole
      for it...and plant it. There are those who will say you should plant
      it in straw above the ground...but that is not natural. Potatoes do
      better in the soil. It is how I still plant my potatoes.

      Gloria, Texas US
    • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
      ... i have been growing potatoes directly on sod with heavy mulch on top . recover with more mulch as it grows . by end of summer you can harvest your
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 22, 2004
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        > Apart from this, i'm about to put into soil potatos too; of course i'm not
        > going to use seddballs in this case, but i don't know how to manage the
        > whole thing without 'touching' the ground, as to say without damaging the
        > soil structure.

        i have been growing potatoes directly on sod with heavy mulch on top .
        recover with more mulch as it grows . by end of summer you can harvest your
        potatoes cleaned and you got a bed free of weeds top sow winter crops or
        ground .cover
        the inconvenience is that you need to harvest mulch ( grasses for me ) on a
        wide surface to maintain your mulch cover over the bed .makes sure also no
        light have access to the tubers .

        i have tried to bury them also but didn't find any avantages than to grow
        them directly on the surface of the sod.( to note that it was a natural
        prairie not a lawn so the plants are way farther apart and don't form a
        tight sod .( i have no experience with lawn type of sod )

        jean-claude
      • Stephen Inniss
        Hello Carlo, I think that by definition there is no way to grow and harvest root crops without disturbing the soil, unless you are constantly adding loads of
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 23, 2004
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          Hello Carlo,

          I think that by definition there is no way to grow and harvest root
          crops without disturbing the soil, unless you are constantly adding
          loads of mulch, as Jean-Claude has described. However, instead of
          traditional potato growing I've planted clover after the potatoes went
          in, and scattered more seed again after I took the potatoes out (taking
          potatoes out of the ground is pretty hard on the clover, but some plants
          survive and seed generates the rest). This is not perfect, but at least
          the soil does not stay bare. Clover keeps less desireable plants from
          colonizing the patch; so far I've found that putting in the potatoes and
          just leaving it does not work very well (I get a carpet of buttercup and
          grasses, and the potatoes do not do so well), and may be even worse than
          bare ground. A good seeding of clover, plus removal of less desireable
          plants in the first year, seems to give decent results. In fact, I think
          my results are better than attempting to keep the soil around the
          potatoes bare. Clover seems to help keep up soil moisture levels in the
          summer, possibly by shading the soil, and prevents leaching and erosion
          when the winter rains hit, and in addition there may be some leakage
          from the clover's nitrogen fixing activities. I'll be able to say more
          after a couple more years of this, but so far I can say that a modest
          patch of potatoes in this style provides some hundreds of pounds of
          potato with very little effort (dig to plant, almost no weeding, and dig
          again to harvest).

          Stephen
        • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
          (dig to plant, almost no weeding, and dig ... and there is no reason to be afraid of disturbing the soils from time to time . wild boars do that very well to
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 23, 2004
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            (dig to plant, almost no weeding, and dig
            > again to harvest).

            and there is no reason to be afraid of disturbing the soils from time to
            time . wild boars do that very well to eat roots and give a chance to a new
            generation of plants to fill this new ecological niche . digging out roots
            is not the same disturbance than tilling the ground . but again if we plant
            potatoe in a monoculture fashion we are left with a completelly bare soil
            after harvest. better to space potatoe plants among other plants .
            jean-claude
          • Gloria C. Baikauskas
            The flower, nicotiana, is reportedly good to plant with potatoes....as it will attract the potato beetle away from the potatoes. Just thought I would add that
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 24, 2004
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              The flower, nicotiana, is reportedly good to plant with
              potatoes....as it will attract the potato beetle away from the
              potatoes. Just thought I would add that information. It is also
              known as flowering tobacco. I have read this several times, but I
              have yet to try it here.

              Gloria, Texas
            • neptune_violet
              ... Thanks Gloria; I am planning on planting potatoes this year. I m going to try out your suggestion. I am new to this group. I joined it to learn more about
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 25, 2004
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                --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Gloria C. Baikauskas"
                <gcb49@f...> wrote:
                >
                Thanks Gloria;

                I am planning on planting potatoes this year. I'm going to try out
                your suggestion.

                I am new to this group. I joined it to learn more about what fukuoka
                farming was about. My garden has been a bionintensive one, but I
                think I would like to try sectioning off some of it for fukuoka
                farming.

                Lorrie, Massachusetts

                The flower, nicotiana, is reportedly good to plant with
                > potatoes....as it will attract the potato beetle away from the
                > potatoes. Just thought I would add that information. It is also
                > known as flowering tobacco. I have read this several times, but I
                > have yet to try it here.
                >
                > Gloria, Texas
              • pollywog
                ... them. Lobelia (incarnata & cardinal), ditto. They will attract the potato beetle, so to plant them together with taters, will bring those pesties
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 25, 2004
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                  ---Is a trap crop, best planted a distance from potatoes, not with
                  them. Lobelia (incarnata & cardinal), ditto.

                  They will attract the potato beetle, so to plant them together with
                  'taters, will bring those pesties hot-n-heavy to the area. Best to
                  plant a bit out and away from the "crop" spots, if one is hoping to
                  keep the beetle away from the people-food. deb

                  In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Gloria C. Baikauskas"
                  <gcb49@f...> wrote:
                  > The flower, nicotiana, is reportedly good to plant with
                  > potatoes....as it will attract the potato beetle away from the
                  > potatoes. Just thought I would add that information. It is also
                  > known as flowering tobacco. I have read this several times, but I
                  > have yet to try it here.
                  >
                  > Gloria, Texas
                • carrieshepard
                  ... Hi Gloria, I just yesterday sprinkled some nicotiana seeds on one raised bed of potatoes and bush beans. I ll report back on how this works for me. Carrie
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 30, 2004
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                    --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Gloria C. Baikauskas"
                    <gcb49@f...> wrote:
                    > The flower, nicotiana, is reportedly good to plant with
                    > potatoes....as it will attract the potato beetle away from the
                    > potatoes. Just thought I would add that information. It is also
                    > known as flowering tobacco. I have read this several times, but I
                    > have yet to try it here.
                    >
                    > Gloria, Texas

                    Hi Gloria,

                    I just yesterday sprinkled some nicotiana seeds on one raised bed of
                    potatoes and bush beans. I'll report back on how this works for me.

                    Carrie
                    in OK
                  • Gloria C. Baikauskas
                    ... of ... Well...it ought to be a really pretty bed to be sure. Both potatoes and beans have pretty flowers....and the nicotiana is no slouch either. Can t
                    Message 9 of 11 , May 1, 2004
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                      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "carrieshepard"
                      <carrieshepard@y...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > Hi Gloria,
                      >
                      > I just yesterday sprinkled some nicotiana seeds on one raised bed
                      of
                      > potatoes and bush beans. I'll report back on how this works for me.
                      >
                      > Carrie
                      > in OK

                      Well...it ought to be a really pretty bed to be sure. Both potatoes
                      and beans have pretty flowers....and the nicotiana is no slouch
                      either. Can't wait to hear your results, Carrie.


                      Are you surviving all these big storms all right there? We got hit
                      again last night. It has slowed me down considerably trying to
                      plant....as well as trying to keep plants from being drowned. We had
                      3 inches of rain the other day. I forgot to empty the rain gauge.
                      It topped off....holds 5 inches....so I know we got at least 2 more
                      last night. Winds have been a huge problem, too, but the hail has
                      missed us. It wouldn't be the first time hail and wind had taken all
                      my fruit from the trees.....or drowned a garden bed...even a raised
                      one.

                      Gloria, Texas
                    • carrieshepard
                      ... hit ... Hi Gloria, We had lots of water and high winds, but thankfully no bad damage at our place. It s definitely wetter than usual, but it s now clear
                      Message 10 of 11 , May 5, 2004
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                        > Are you surviving all these big storms all right there? We got
                        hit
                        > again last night. >
                        > Gloria, Texas

                        Hi Gloria,

                        We had lots of water and high winds, but thankfully no bad damage at
                        our place. It's definitely wetter than usual, but it's now clear
                        skies and dry enough that I have to water my seedlings daily again.

                        We mulched my main garden heavily with grass hay I bought over the
                        weekend just this morning. Peas are blooming now, tomatoes look
                        nice and strong, onions are growing quickly, rhubarb looks beautiful,
                        picking asparagus every other day, and it's nice and lush looking
                        with all the irises blooming now. My roses are beginning to bloom
                        and I'm sure would already have if the goats hadn't eaten the tops
                        off them before I got their fence secured.

                        I planted garlic bulbs around my fruit trees and I'm going to mulch
                        them and try seeding more perennial herbs as I have the time. I
                        have a packet of daikon radish seeds that I want to also plant
                        around the place and see how they work in different parts of my
                        landscape.

                        I've been mulching my flower bed behind my house with the droppings
                        and hay from the bunny cottage and when it's full I'll begin
                        mulching my grape vines and other flower beds as well. I'd like to
                        get some more geese soon for the orchard also.

                        Blessings,
                        Carrie
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